William A. Hammond

William Alexander HammondHammondW. A. HammondWilliam HammondDr. William HammondHammond, William Alexander
William Alexander Hammond (28 August 1828 – 5 January 1900) was an American military physician and neurologist.wikipedia
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National Museum of Health and Medicine

Army Medical MuseumMuseum of Military Medicine
During the American Civil War he was the eleventh Surgeon General of the United States Army (1862–1864) and the founder of the Army Medical Museum (now the National Museum of Health and Medicine). In Washington he founded the National Museum of Health and Medicine (then called Army Medical Museum) and put John H. Brinton in charge.
The museum was founded by U.S. Army Surgeon General William A. Hammond as the Army Medical Museum (AMM) in 1862; it became the NMHM in 1989 and relocated to its present site at the Army's Forest Glen Annex in 2011.

Neurology

neurologistneurologicalneurologists
William Alexander Hammond (28 August 1828 – 5 January 1900) was an American military physician and neurologist.
The academic discipline began between the 15th and 16th centuries with the work and research of many neurologists such as Thomas Willis, Robert Whytt, Matthew Baillie, Charles Bell, Moritz Heinrich Romberg, Duchenne de Boulogne, William A. Hammond, Jean-Martin Charcot, and John Hughlings Jackson.

Surgeon General of the United States Army

Surgeon GeneralU.S. Army Surgeon GeneralSurgeon General of the U.S. Army
During the American Civil War he was the eleventh Surgeon General of the United States Army (1862–1864) and the founder of the Army Medical Museum (now the National Museum of Health and Medicine).

Medical Corps (United States Army)

U.S. Army Medical CorpsMedical CorpsUnited States Army Medical Corps
He raised the requirements for admission into the Army Medical Corps.
In 1862, Surgeon General William Alexander Hammond proposed establishment of an "Army Medical School" in which medical cadets and others seeking admission to the MC could receive such post-graduate instruction as would better fit them for military commissions.

Jonathan Letterman

John McNultyJonathan K. LettermanLetterman
There Hammond met Jonathan Letterman.
A month later William A. Hammond, Surgeon General of the U.S. Army appointed him, with the rank of major, as the medical director of the Army of the Potomac itself.

Clara Lanza

Hammond co-authored a novel with his daughter, the novelist Clara Lanza.
Lanza was born Clara Hammond in Fort Riley, Kansas, the daughter of William A. Hammond, a physician who served as the Surgeon General of the United States Army during the second half of the American Civil War, and his first wife, Helen Nisbet.

John H. Brinton

In Washington he founded the National Museum of Health and Medicine (then called Army Medical Museum) and put John H. Brinton in charge.
Surgeon General William Alexander Hammond made him the first curator of the National Museum of Health and Medicine.

Satterlee General Hospital

Satterlee Hospitallargest Union military hospitalsSatterlee U.S.A. General Hospital
The number of hospitals was greatly increased and he paid close attention to ventilation He created Satterlee Hospital (which had up to 4,500 beds in hundreds of tents).
Founded in 1862 by order of Surgeon-General William Alexander Hammond, the hospital was built in the sparsely developed neighborhood of West Philadelphia near the intersection of 42nd Street and Baltimore Avenue on 15 acre grounds which ran north to 45th and Pine Streets.

Graeme Hammond

Dr. Graeme M. HammondGraeme M. HammondGraeme Monroe Hammond
His son Graeme Hammond also was a neurologist, as well as an Olympic fencer.
Graeme Monroe Hammond was born on February 1, 1858 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of neurologist and Surgeon General of the United States Army Brigadier General William Alexander Hammond.

Fasting girl

Fasting girlsMollie FancherSarah Jacob
His book, Fasting Girls: Their Physiology and Pathology (1879) is still referenced today as a historical example of a skeptical examination of the paranormal claims of fasting girls.
Doctors, however, such as William A. Hammond ascribed the phenomenon to fraud and hysteria on the part of the girl.

Calomel

On 4 May 1863 Hammond banned the mercury compound calomel from army supplies, as he believed it to be neither safe nor effective (he was later proved correct).
On May 4, 1863, William A. Hammond, the United States’ Surgeon-General, stated that calomel would no longer be used in the army as it was being abused by soldiers and physicians alike.

Hammond's flycatcher

Empidonax hammondiiHammond’s
The name of this bird commemorates William Alexander Hammond who was the surgeon general of the US Army.

Two-striped garter snake

Thamnophis hammondiiTwo-striped gartersnake
The specific name, hammondii, is in honor of William A. Hammond, the U.S. Army surgeon who collected the first specimens.

Spea hammondii

western spadefoot toadwestern spadefootwestern spadefoot toads
The specific name hammondii is in honor of physician and naturalist William Alexander Hammond.

Medicine in the American Civil War

19th-century medicineActing Assistant SurgeonCivil War
In 1862 William A. Hammond became surgeon general and launched a series of reforms.

Joseph Barnes

Joseph K. BarnesBarnesBarnes, Joseph K.
Joseph Barnes, a friend of Stanton's and his personal physician, became acting Surgeon General.
It was but a few weeks after this advancement that the difficulties between Stanton and Surgeon General William Alexander Hammond culminated in the detachment of the latter from his office.

Athetosis

athetoidslow writhing movements
The first noted case of athetosis was discovered by W. A. Hammond and described in his book Diseases of the Nervous System in 1871.

Military medicine

military physicianmilitary surgeonmilitary doctor
William Alexander Hammond (28 August 1828 – 5 January 1900) was an American military physician and neurologist.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil WarUnited States Civil War
During the American Civil War he was the eleventh Surgeon General of the United States Army (1862–1864) and the founder of the Army Medical Museum (now the National Museum of Health and Medicine).

American Neurological Association

FANA
He was the first American physician to devote himself entirely to neurology, the author of the first American treatise about neurology, and one of the founders of the American Neurological Association.

Maryland

MDState of MarylandMaryland, USA
Born in Annapolis (Maryland), Hammond grew up in Harrisburg (Pennsylvania).

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

HarrisburgHarrisburg, PAHarrisburg, Pa.
Born in Annapolis (Maryland), Hammond grew up in Harrisburg (Pennsylvania).

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
Born in Annapolis (Maryland), Hammond grew up in Harrisburg (Pennsylvania).

New York University

NYUUniversity of the City of New YorkNew York
He received his M.D. from New York University at the age of 20.