William Calley

Lieutenant CalleyCalley caseJudgment: The Court Martial of Lieutenant William CalleyLieutenant Calley's storyLt. William CalleyWilliam Calley Jr.William L. CalleyWilliam L. Calley Jr.William Laws Calley Jr.William Laws Calley, Jr
William Laws Calley Jr. (born June 8, 1943) is an American former United States Army officer convicted by court-martial of murdering 22 unarmed South Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai Massacre on March 16, 1968, during the Vietnam War.wikipedia
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My Lai Massacre

My LaiSon MyMy Lai incident
William Laws Calley Jr. (born June 8, 1943) is an American former United States Army officer convicted by court-martial of murdering 22 unarmed South Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai Massacre on March 16, 1968, during the Vietnam War.
Twenty-six soldiers were charged with criminal offenses, but only Lieutenant William Calley Jr., a platoon leader in C Company, was convicted.

Miami Edison High School

Miami Edison Senior High SchoolMiami (FL) EdisonEdison
Calley Jr. graduated from Miami Edison High School in Miami and then attended Palm Beach Junior College in 1963.

23rd Infantry Division (United States)

Americal Division23rd Infantry DivisionAmerical
In May or June 1969 near Chu Lai Base Area, Calley and two other Americal Division officers were in a jeep that passed a jeep containing five Marines.
It combined solid service in numerous battles and campaigns with the My Lai massacre, which was committed by a platoon of the division's subordinate 11th Infantry Brigade, led by Lieutenant William Calley.

20th Infantry Regiment (United States)

20th Infantry Regiment20th Infantry20th U.S. Infantry
He was assigned to 1st Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 11th Infantry Brigade, and began training at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, in preparation for deployment to South Vietnam.
See also William Calley.

George W. Latimer

George Latimer
Taking the witness stand, Calley, under the direct examination by his civilian defense lawyer George W. Latimer, claimed that on the previous day, his commanding officer, Captain Medina, made it clear that his unit was to move into the village and that everyone was to be shot, saying that they all were Viet Cong.
George Webster Latimer – (November 28, 1900 – May 3, 1990) was a Utah lawyer most known for representing Lt. William Calley Jr. in his court martial from the My Lai incident.

Palm Beach State College

Palm Beach Community CollegePalm Beach Junior CollegePalm Beach CC
Calley Jr. graduated from Miami Edison High School in Miami and then attended Palm Beach Junior College in 1963.

Ronald Ridenhour

Ron RidenhourRonald L. RidenhourRonald Lee Ridenhour
In April 1969, nearly 13 months after the massacre, Ron Ridenhour, a GI who had been with the 11th Brigade, wrote letters to the President, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Secretary of Defense and 30 members of Congress.
On his return to the United States, he sent letters to 30 members of Congress and to Pentagon officials, spurring a probe that led to several indictments against those involved, and the conviction of William Calley.

Wayne Greenhaw

On November 12, 1969, investigative reporters Seymour Hersh and Wayne Greenhaw broke the story and revealed that Calley had been charged with murdering 109 South Vietnamese.
He wrote for The Montgomery Journal (which was later incorporated into the Montgomery Advertiser) and helped break the story of the indictment of William Calley for murder on September 12, 1969; Greenhaw was one of only a few people who spent time with Calley in that time, having him over at his house in Montgomery, Alabama.

Jimmy Carter

CarterPresident CarterPresident Jimmy Carter
Georgia's Governor, Jimmy Carter, future President of the United States, instituted American Fighting Man's Day, and asked Georgians to drive for a week with their lights on.
When Lieutenant William Calley was convicted in a military trial and sentenced to life for his role in the My Lai Massacre in South Vietnam, a politically polarizing issue, Carter avoided paying direct tribute to Calley.

Hugh Thompson Jr.

Hugh Thompson, Jr.Hugh ThompsonHugh Thompson, Jr
Twenty-six officers and enlisted soldiers, including William Calley and Ernest Medina, were charged with criminal offenses, but all were either acquitted or pardoned.

United States Disciplinary Barracks

LeavenworthU.S. Disciplinary BarracksFort Leavenworth
On March 31, 1971, Calley was sentenced to life imprisonment and hard labor at Fort Leavenworth, which includes the United States Disciplinary Barracks, the Department of Defense's only maximum security prison.

Ernest Medina

In his new defense, Calley claimed he was following the orders of his immediate superior, Captain Ernest Medina.
Do I see Lieutenant Calley?

Winter Soldier Investigation

1971 eventWikiquoteWinter Soldier
At the Winter Soldier Investigation in Detroit organized by Vietnam Veterans Against the War January 31–February 2, 1971, veterans expressed their outrage, including 1st Lt. William Crandell of the 199th Light Infantry Brigade, Americal Division:
"We gathered not to sensationalize our service but to decry the travesty that was Lt. William Calley's trial for the My Lai Massacre. The U.S. had established the principle of culpability with the Nuremberg trials of the Nazis. Following those principles, we held that if Calley were responsible, so were his superiors up the chain of command — even to the president. The causes of My Lai and the brutality of the Vietnam War were rooted in the policies of our government as executed by our military commanders."

Glenn Andreotta

Charles M. Dutton
Second Lieutenant William Calley (1st Platoon Leader, C Company) then came up, and the two had the following conversation:

The Battle Hymn of Lt. Calley

Battle Hymn of Lt. CalleyThe Battle-Hymn of Lieutenant Calley
It offers a heroic description of Lieutenant William Calley, who in March 1971 was convicted of murdering Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai Massacre of March 16, 1968.

Lawrence Colburn

Larry Colburn
Second Lieutenant William Calley (1st Platoon Leader, Charlie Company) then came up, and the two had the following conversation:

Terry Nelson (musician)

Terry NelsonC-Company featuring Terry NelsonC. Company featuring Terry Nelson
The single, entitled "Battle Hymn of Lt. Calley", was a spoken-word recording with a musical background which defended William Calley and the massacre at My Lai, for which Calley was court-martialed in 1970-71.

J. Robert Elliott

On February 27, 1974, Judge J. Robert Elliott granted a writ of habeas corpus and set Calley free on bail.
In 1974, Elliott gained notoriety for overturning the conviction of Army Lt. William Calley for killing 22 people during the 1968 My Lai massacre, a decision later overruled by the appeals court.

Samuel W. Koster

Gen'ral KosterSamuel Koster
On March 16, 1968, a company of Americal Division troops led by Captain Ernest Medina and Lieutenant William Calley slaughtered hundreds of civilians in a South Vietnamese hamlet known as My Lai (referred to as "Pinkville" by the troops).

Superior orders

Nuremberg Defenseonly following ordersjust following orders
Following the My Lai Massacre in 1968, the defense was employed during the court martial of William Calley.

United States Army

U.S. ArmyUS ArmyArmy
William Laws Calley Jr. (born June 8, 1943) is an American former United States Army officer convicted by court-martial of murdering 22 unarmed South Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai Massacre on March 16, 1968, during the Vietnam War.

Officer (armed forces)

officercommissionedofficers
William Laws Calley Jr. (born June 8, 1943) is an American former United States Army officer convicted by court-martial of murdering 22 unarmed South Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai Massacre on March 16, 1968, during the Vietnam War.

Court-martial

court martialcourts-martialmilitary court
William Laws Calley Jr. (born June 8, 1943) is an American former United States Army officer convicted by court-martial of murdering 22 unarmed South Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai Massacre on March 16, 1968, during the Vietnam War.

South Vietnam

Republic of VietnamSouth VietnameseSouth
William Laws Calley Jr. (born June 8, 1943) is an American former United States Army officer convicted by court-martial of murdering 22 unarmed South Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai Massacre on March 16, 1968, during the Vietnam War. He was assigned to 1st Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 11th Infantry Brigade, and began training at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, in preparation for deployment to South Vietnam.

Vietnam War

Vietnamwar in VietnamSecond Indochina War
William Laws Calley Jr. (born June 8, 1943) is an American former United States Army officer convicted by court-martial of murdering 22 unarmed South Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai Massacre on March 16, 1968, during the Vietnam War.