William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley

William CecilLord BurghleySir William CecilBurghleyCecilWilliam Cecil, Lord BurghleyLord BurleighSir William Cecil, Lord BurghleyThe Lord BurghleyBurleigh
William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, (13 September 15204 August 1598) was an English statesman, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I for most of her reign, twice Secretary of State (1550–1553 and 1558–1572) and Lord High Treasurer from 1572.wikipedia
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Marquess of Salisbury

Marquesses of SalisburySalisburypeerage
He was the father of Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury and founder of the Cecil dynasty (Marquesses of Exeter and of Salisbury) which has produced many politicians including two prime ministers.
This branch of the Cecil family descends from Sir Robert Cecil, the son of the prominent statesman the 1st Baron Burghley, from his second marriage, to Mildred Cooke.

Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury

Robert CecilSir Robert CecilCecil
He was the father of Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury and founder of the Cecil dynasty (Marquesses of Exeter and of Salisbury) which has produced many politicians including two prime ministers.
Cecil (created Salisbury in 1605) was the younger son of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley by his second wife, Mildred Cooke, eldest daughter of Sir Anthony Cooke of Gidea, Essex.

Burghley House

BurghleyBurghley ParkBurghley Estate
Cecil was born in Bourne, Lincolnshire, in 1520, the son of Sir Richard Cecil, owner of the Burghley estate (near Stamford, Lincolnshire), and his wife, Jane Heckington.
Burghley was built for Sir William Cecil, later 1st Baron Burghley, who was Lord High Treasurer to Queen Elizabeth I of England, between 1558 and 1587, and modelled on the privy lodgings of Richmond Palace.

Stamford School

BrowneStamfordStamford School Ground
William, the only son, was put to school first at The King's School, Grantham, and then Stamford School, which he later saved and endowed.
Founded as a chantry school, it fell foul of the Protestant reformers and was only saved from destruction under the Chantries Act of Edward VI by the personal intervention of Sir William Cecil (later Lord Burghley) who worked in the service of Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset and who secured a specific Act of Parliament in 1548 ensuring its survival.

Mildred Cooke

Lady BurghleyBurleigh, Lady MildredLady Cicell
Three years later, on 21 December 1546 he married Mildred Cooke, who was ranked by Ascham with Lady Jane Grey as one of the two most learned ladies in the kingdom, (aside from another of Ascham's pupils, Elizabeth Tudor, who was later Elizabeth I) and whose sister, Anne, was the wife of Sir Nicholas Bacon, and later the mother of Sir Francis Bacon.
She was the wife of Elizabeth I's most trusted adviser, William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, and the mother of Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury, adviser to James I.

Gray's Inn

Grays InnGray's Inn SquareGray’s Inn
He also acquired the affections of Cheke's sister, Mary, and was in 1541 removed by his father to Gray's Inn, without having taken a degree, as was common at the time for those not intending to enter the Church.
Thanks to the efforts of prominent members such as William Cecil and Gilbert Gerard, Gray's Inn became the largest of the four by number, with over 200 barristers recorded as members.

Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter

Thomas CecilSir Thomas CecilThomas Cecil, 2nd Baron Burghley
The only child of this marriage, Thomas, the future Earl of Exeter, was born in May 1542, and in February 1543 Cecil's first wife died.
Thomas Cecil was the elder son of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, by his first wife, Mary Cheke (d. February 1543), daughter of Peter Cheke of Cambridge, Esquire Bedell of the University from 1509 until his death in 1529 (and sister of Sir John Cheke).

Stamford (UK Parliament constituency)

StamfordStamford (seat 1/2)Stamford, Lincolnshire
He was elected Member of Parliament for Stamford five times, between 1504 and 1523.
* 1543: William Cecil

John Cheke

Sir John Cheke
In May 1535, at the age of fourteen, he went to St John's College, Cambridge, where he was brought into contact with the foremost scholars of the time, Roger Ascham and John Cheke, and acquired an unusual knowledge of Greek.
Blythe married Alice, one of Cheke's sisters, before 1536, and in 1541 William Cecil (afterwards Lord Burleigh), Cheke's distinguished student, married Mary Cheke, another.

Francis Bacon

BaconSir Francis BaconBaconian
Three years later, on 21 December 1546 he married Mildred Cooke, who was ranked by Ascham with Lady Jane Grey as one of the two most learned ladies in the kingdom, (aside from another of Ascham's pupils, Elizabeth Tudor, who was later Elizabeth I) and whose sister, Anne, was the wife of Sir Nicholas Bacon, and later the mother of Sir Francis Bacon.
His mother's sister was married to William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, making Burghley Bacon's uncle.

Richard Cecil (courtier)

Richard CecilSir Richard CecilRic. Cecile
Cecil was born in Bourne, Lincolnshire, in 1520, the son of Sir Richard Cecil, owner of the Burghley estate (near Stamford, Lincolnshire), and his wife, Jane Heckington.
He had one son, William Cecil, Lord Burghley (1520–1598), and three daughters.

William Camden

CamdenBritanniaCamden's ''Britannia
Pedigrees, elaborated by Cecil himself with the help of William Camden the antiquary, associated him with the Welsh Cecils or Seisyllts of Allt-Yr-Ynys, Walterstone, on the border of Herefordshire and Monmouthshire.
In 1597, William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley suggested that Camden write a history of Queen Elizabeth's reign.

Stamford, Lincolnshire

StamfordStamford (town)Stamford Art Centre
Cecil was born in Bourne, Lincolnshire, in 1520, the son of Sir Richard Cecil, owner of the Burghley estate (near Stamford, Lincolnshire), and his wife, Jane Heckington.
Near Stamford (but actually in the historic Soke of Peterborough) is Burghley House, an Elizabethan mansion, vast and ornate, built by the First Minister of Elizabeth I, Sir William Cecil, later Lord Burghley.

Secretary of State (England)

Secretary of StateEnglish Secretary of StatePrincipal Secretary
William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, (13 September 15204 August 1598) was an English statesman, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I for most of her reign, twice Secretary of State (1550–1553 and 1558–1572) and Lord High Treasurer from 1572. It was rumoured in December 1554 that Cecil would succeed Sir William Petre as Secretary of State, an office which, with his chancellorship of the Garter, he had lost on Mary's accession to the throne.
Sir William Cecil (5 September 1550 – July 1553)

St John's College, Cambridge

St John's CollegeSt. John's CollegeSt John
In May 1535, at the age of fourteen, he went to St John's College, Cambridge, where he was brought into contact with the foremost scholars of the time, Roger Ascham and John Cheke, and acquired an unusual knowledge of Greek.
Sir William Cecil, Lord Burleigh

Lord High Treasurer

TreasurerLord TreasurerTreasurer of England
William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, (13 September 15204 August 1598) was an English statesman, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I for most of her reign, twice Secretary of State (1550–1553 and 1558–1572) and Lord High Treasurer from 1572.
Exemplifying the power of the Lord High Treasurer is William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, who served in the post from 1572 to 1598.

Nicholas Bacon (Lord Keeper)

Nicholas BaconSir Nicholas BaconNicholas
Three years later, on 21 December 1546 he married Mildred Cooke, who was ranked by Ascham with Lady Jane Grey as one of the two most learned ladies in the kingdom, (aside from another of Ascham's pupils, Elizabeth Tudor, who was later Elizabeth I) and whose sister, Anne, was the wife of Sir Nicholas Bacon, and later the mother of Sir Francis Bacon.
However, on the accession of her younger sister, Elizabeth in 1558 he was appointed Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, largely owing to the influence of his brother-in-law William Cecil.

Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford

Earl of OxfordEdward de Vere17th Earl of Oxford
These included Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, and Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland.
After the death of his father in 1562, he became a ward of Queen Elizabeth and was sent to live in the household of her principal advisor, Sir William Cecil.

Bourne, Lincolnshire

BourneBourne North FenBourne (town)
Cecil was born in Bourne, Lincolnshire, in 1520, the son of Sir Richard Cecil, owner of the Burghley estate (near Stamford, Lincolnshire), and his wife, Jane Heckington.
William Cecil (1520–1598) became the first Lord Burghley after serving Queen Elizabeth I for forty years, during which time he was the main architect of Britain's policies, with a reputation for renaissance statecraft, diplomat, politician and administrator. He was born at a house in the centre of Bourne that is now the Burghley Arms. There is a plaque outside.

The King's School, Grantham

The King's SchoolKing's SchoolGrantham Grammar School
William, the only son, was put to school first at The King's School, Grantham, and then Stamford School, which he later saved and endowed.
William Cecil (statesman) (1530s);

William Petre

Sir William PetreGertrude TyrellLord Petre
It was rumoured in December 1554 that Cecil would succeed Sir William Petre as Secretary of State, an office which, with his chancellorship of the Garter, he had lost on Mary's accession to the throne.
Petre's career is strikingly similar to those of other statesmen of his time, such as William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, John Mason, and Richard Rich, 1st Baron Rich, who, 'sprung from the willow rather than the oak', and served with equal fidelity Kings Henry, Edward and Queens Mary, and Elizabeth, surviving all contemporary political and religious storms.

Edward Stafford (diplomat)

Sir Edward StaffordEdward Stafford
Leimon and Parker argue that Burghley was the principal protector of Edward Stafford, the English ambassador to Paris and a paid spy who helped the Spanish at the time of the Spanish Armada.
Further it was his duty to report to London intelligence he possessed on the formation of the Spanish Armada, but did not do so. The English counterspy Francis Walsingham was deeply suspicious but was unable to prove anything, and could not act as long as Stafford was protected by Lord Burghley.

Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester

Earl of LeicesterRobert DudleyLeicester
His vacant post was offered to Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester, who declined it and proposed Burghley, stating that the latter was the more suitable candidate because of his greater "learning and knowledge".
Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, was one of Elizabeth's leading statesmen, involved in domestic as well as foreign politics alongside William Cecil and Francis Walsingham.

Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton

Earl of SouthamptonHenry WriothesleySouthampton
These included Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, and Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland.
According to Akrigg, Howard then "entered into some further agreement, of which no documentation can now be found, which transferred to Lord Burghley personally the custody and marriage of the young Earl, but left Howard holding his lands", and late in 1581 or early in 1582 Southampton, then eight years of age, came to live at Cecil House in the Strand.

John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland

Duke of NorthumberlandJohn DudleyEarl of Warwick
Cecil ingratiated himself with John Dudley, then Earl of Warwick, and after less than three months he was out of the Tower.
William Cecil was still in the Duke of Somerset's service when he gradually shifted his loyalty to John Dudley, who made him Secretary of State and thought him "a most faithful servant and by that term most witty [wise] councillor ... as was scarce like in this realm".