William Howard Taft

Taft in 1909
Yale College photograph of Taft
Sultan Jamalul Kiram II with William Howard Taft of the Philippine Commission in Jolo, Sulu (March 27, 1901)
Roosevelt introduces Taft as his crown prince: Puck magazine cover cartoon, 1906.
One of a series of candid photographs known as the Evolution of a Smile, taken just after a formal portrait session, as Taft learns by telephone from Roosevelt of his nomination for president.
1908 Taft/Sherman poster
1908 electoral vote results
1909 inauguration
Newton McConnell cartoon showing Canadian suspicions that Taft and others were only interested in Canada when prosperous.
Taft and Porfirio Díaz, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, 1909
Official White House portrait of Taft by Anders Zorn, c. 1911
Taft promoted Associate Justice Edward Douglass White to be Chief Justice of the United States.
1909 Puck magazine cover: Roosevelt departs, entrusting his policies to Taft
Taft with Archibald Butt (second from right)
Taft and Roosevelt – political enemies in 1912
Campaign advertisement arguing Taft deserved a second term
Electoral vote by state, 1912. States won by Taft are in red.
Taft (left) with President Warren G. Harding and Robert Lincoln at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial, May 30, 1922
Chief Justice Taft, c. 1921
The U.S. Supreme Court in 1925. Taft is seated in the bottom row, middle.
Time cover, June 30, 1924
Taft insisted that Charles Evans Hughes succeed him as chief justice.
Taft's headstone at Arlington National Cemetery
Four-cent stamp issued for Taft (1930)

The 27th president of the United States (1909–1913) and the tenth chief justice of the United States (1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices.

- William Howard Taft
Taft in 1909

130 related topics

Alpha

Robert M. La Follette

For his son, also a senator, see Robert M. La Follette Jr. "Fighting Bob" redirects here.

For his son, also a senator, see Robert M. La Follette Jr. "Fighting Bob" redirects here.

Robert M. La Follette's college yearbook photo, 1879
Portrait from History of the Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, vol. 2, 1898
La Follette addressing a large Chautauqua assembly in Decatur, Illinois, 1905
La Follette in 1908
La Follette in 1912
Time cover, December 3, 1923
La Follette recording a radio speech in 1924, shortly before his death
1924 presidential election results by county. Counties won by La Follette are marked green.
La Follette with his wife and daughter in February 1924

He initially supported President William Howard Taft, but broke with Taft after the latter failed to push a reduction in tariff rates.

President of the United States

Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

George Washington, the first president of the United States
President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivers a radio address, 1933
President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King Jr. and others look on
President Donald Trump delivers his 2018 State of the Union Address, with Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Gorbachev sign the 1990 Chemical Weapons Accord in the White House.
Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, successfully preserved the Union during the American Civil War.
President Barack Obama with his Supreme Court appointee Justice Sotomayor, 2009
President Ronald Reagan reviews honor guards during a state visit to China, 1984
President Woodrow Wilson throws out the ceremonial first ball on Opening Day, 1916
President Jimmy Carter (left) debates Republican nominee Ronald Reagan on October 28, 1980.
Map of the United States showing the number of electoral votes allocated following the 2010 census to each state and the District of Columbia for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections; it also notes that Maine and Nebraska distribute electors by way of the congressional district method. 270 electoral votes are required for a majority out of 538 votes possible.
Franklin D. Roosevelt won a record four presidential elections (1932, 1936, 1940 and 1944), leading to the adoption of a two-term limit.
President William McKinley and his successor, Theodore Roosevelt
President Reagan surrounded by Secret Service
From left: George H. W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter. Photo taken in the Oval Office on January 7, 2009; Obama formally took office thirteen days later.
Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Jimmy Carter at the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, 2013
White House, the official residence
Camp David, the official retreat
Blair House, the official guest house
The presidential limousine, dubbed "The Beast"
The presidential plane, called Air Force One when the president is on board
Marine One helicopter, when the president is aboard

Historians believe Roosevelt permanently changed the political system by strengthening the presidency, with some key accomplishments including breaking up trusts, conservationism, labor reforms, making personal character as important as the issues, and hand-picking his successor, William Howard Taft.

Alphonso Taft

American jurist, diplomat, politician, Attorney General and Secretary of War under President Ulysses S. Grant.

American jurist, diplomat, politician, Attorney General and Secretary of War under President Ulysses S. Grant.

Secretary of War Alphonso Taft

He was also the founder of the Taft political dynasty, and father of President and Chief Justice William Howard Taft.

Gifford Pinchot portrait by Pirie MacDonald, 1909

Gifford Pinchot

American forester and politician.

American forester and politician.

Gifford Pinchot portrait by Pirie MacDonald, 1909
Portrait of Gifford Pinchot by Benjamin Johnston, c. 1901
Theodore Roosevelt and Gifford Pinchot on the steamer Mississippi, 1907
Pinchot visiting summer campers attending the School of Forestry camp at Grey Towers (Pinchot is with the dog), 1910
Time cover, November 23, 1925
Grey Towers near Milford, Pennsylvania, a National Historic Site

After William Howard Taft succeeded Roosevelt as president, Pinchot was at the center of the Pinchot–Ballinger controversy, a dispute with Secretary of the Interior Richard A. Ballinger that led to Pinchot's dismissal.

The bull moose was the party's official mascot

Progressive Party (United States, 1912)

The bull moose was the party's official mascot
The 1912 Progressive National Convention at the Chicago Coliseum
Theodore Roosevelt was the founder of the Progressive Party and thus is often associated with the party
16-page campaign booklet with the platform of the new Progressive Party
Roosevelt mixing ideologies in his speeches in this 1912 editorial cartoon by Karl K. Knecht (1883–1972) in the Evansville Courier
Roosevelt and Hiram Johnson after nomination
Pro-Roosevelt cartoon contrasts the Republican Party bosses in back row and Progressive Party reformers in front

The Progressive Party was a third party in the United States formed in 1912 by former president Theodore Roosevelt after he lost the presidential nomination of the Republican Party to his former protégé rival, incumbent president William Howard Taft.

1908 United States presidential election

The 31st quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 3, 1908.

The 31st quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 3, 1908.

The aging and balding "Boy Orator of the Platte" delivers a speech.
Map of presidential election results by county
Roosevelt handing over his policies to his political protégé, William H. Taft.
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William J Bryan in 1906 as Moses with new 10 commandments; Puck 19 sept 1906 by Joseph Keppler. Tablet reads: l-Thou shalt have no other leaders before me. II—Thou shalt not make unto thyself any high Protective Tariff. Ill—Eight hours, and no more, shalt thou labor and do all thy work. IV—Thou shalt not graft. V—Thou shalt not elect thy Senators save by Popular Vote. VI—Thou shalt not grant rebates unto thy neighbor. VII—Thou shalt not make combinations in restraint of trade. VIII—Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's income, but shall make him pay a tax upon it. IX—There shall be no more government by injunction. X—Remember Election Day to vote it early. P.S.— When in doubt, ask Me.
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Map of Republican presidential election results by county
Map of Democratic presidential election results by county
Map of "other" presidential election results by county
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "other" presidential election results by county
Taft-Sherman postcard
Collier's magazine cover
Humorous postcard
John Johnson ribbon
Taft-Sherman postcard with U.S. Capitol
Bryan-Kern postcard with U.S. Capitol

Secretary of War and Republican Party nominee William Howard Taft defeated three-time Democratic nominee William Jennings Bryan.

In the 1920s, sculptor Gutzon Borglum and President Calvin Coolidge selected George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln (L to R) to appear on Mount Rushmore—it later became an iconic symbol of presidential greatness, chosen to represent the nation's birth, growth, development and preservation, respectively.

Historical rankings of presidents of the United States

In political studies, surveys have been conducted in order to construct historical rankings of the success of the presidents of the United States.

In political studies, surveys have been conducted in order to construct historical rankings of the success of the presidents of the United States.

In the 1920s, sculptor Gutzon Borglum and President Calvin Coolidge selected George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln (L to R) to appear on Mount Rushmore—it later became an iconic symbol of presidential greatness, chosen to represent the nation's birth, growth, development and preservation, respectively.

19) William Howard Taft (39%)

Nominees Taft and Sherman

1912 Republican National Convention

Held at the Chicago Coliseum, Chicago, Illinois, from June 18 to June 22, 1912.

Held at the Chicago Coliseum, Chicago, Illinois, from June 18 to June 22, 1912.

Nominees Taft and Sherman
The 1912 Republican National Convention in session
Crowd outside the convention hall

The party nominated President William H. Taft and Vice President James S. Sherman for re-election for the 1912 United States presidential election.

League of Nations

The first worldwide intergovernmental organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.

The first worldwide intergovernmental organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.

Anachronous world map showing member states of the League during its 26-year history.
The 1864 Geneva Convention, one of the earliest formulations of international law
The League to Enforce Peace published this full-page promotion in The New York Times on Christmas Day 1918. It resolved that the League "should ensure peace by eliminating causes of dissension, by deciding controversies by peaceable means, and by uniting the potential force of all the members as a standing menace against any nation that seeks to upset the peace of the world".
On his December 1918 trip to Europe, Woodrow Wilson gave speeches that "reaffirmed that the making of peace and the creation of a League of Nations must be accomplished as one single objective".
In 1924, the headquarters of the League was named "Palais Wilson", after Woodrow Wilson, who was credited as the "Founder of the League of Nations"
League of Nations Organisation chart
Palace of Nations, Geneva, the League's headquarters from 1936 until its dissolution in 1946
Child labour in a coal mine, United States, c. 1912
Child labour in Kamerun in 1919
A sample Nansen passport
A map of the world in 1920–45, which shows the League of Nations members during its history
Chinese delegate addresses the League of Nations concerning the Manchurian Crisis in 1932.
Emperor Haile Selassie I going into exile in Bath, England via Jerusalem
The Gap in the Bridge; the sign reads "This League of Nations Bridge was designed by the President of the U.S.A."
Cartoon from Punch magazine, 10 December 1920, satirising the gap left by the US not joining the League.
World map showing member states of the League of Nations (in green and red) on 18 April 1946, when the League of Nations ceased to exist.
League of Nations archives, Geneva.

In 1915, a similar body to the Bryce group was set up in the United States led by former president William Howard Taft.

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

Constitution of the United States

Supreme law of the United States of America.

Supreme law of the United States of America.

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.
Signing of the Constitution, September 17, 1787 (1940 by Howard Chandler Christy)
Dates the 13 states ratified the Constitution
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"We the People" in an original edition
Closing endorsement section of the United States Constitution
United States Bill of Rights
Currently housed in the National Archives.
John Jay, 1789–1795
John Marshall, 1801–1835
Salmon P. Chase {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Chase Court, 1864–1873, in 1865 were Salmon P. Chase (chief Justice); Hon. Nathan Clifford, Maine; Stephen J. Field, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Hon. Samuel F. Miller, U.S. Supreme Court; Hon. Noah H. Swayne, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Judge Morrison R. Waite}}
William Howard Taft {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Taft Court, 1921–1930, in 1925 were James Clark McReynolds, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., William Howard Taft (chief justice), Willis Van Devanter, Louis Brandeis. Edward Sanford, George Sutherland, Pierce Butler, Harlan Fiske Stone}}
Earl Warren {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Warren Court, 1953–1969, in 1963 were Felix Frankfurter; Hugo Black; Earl Warren (chief justice); Stanley Reed; William O. Douglas. Tom Clark; Robert H. Jackson; Harold Burton; Sherman Minton}}
William Rehnquist {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Rehnquist Court, 1986–2005.}}
José Rizal
Sun Yat-sen

William Howard Taft was a Harding appointment to chief justice from 1921 to 1930.