William Jennings Bryan

BryanWilliam J. BryanpoliticianW. J. BryanWilliam BryanWilliam Jennings BryantAmerican politician of the same nameBryan DemocratsBryan MovementBryan, William Jennings
William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American orator and politician from Nebraska.wikipedia
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1896 United States presidential election

18961896 presidential election1896 election
Beginning in 1896, he emerged as a dominant force in the Democratic Party, standing three times as the party's nominee for President of the United States in the 1896, 1900, and 1908 elections. In the intensely fought 1896 presidential election, Republican nominee William McKinley emerged triumphant.
Former Governor William McKinley, the Republican candidate, defeated Democrat William Jennings Bryan.

History of the United States Democratic Party

Democratic PartyDemocraticDemocrat
Beginning in 1896, he emerged as a dominant force in the Democratic Party, standing three times as the party's nominee for President of the United States in the 1896, 1900, and 1908 elections.
The agrarian element, marching behind the slogan of free silver (i.e. in favor of inflation), captured the party in 1896 and nominated William Jennings Bryan in the 1896, 1900 and 1908 presidential elections, although he lost every time.

1900 United States presidential election

19001900 presidential electionU.S. presidential election, 1900
Beginning in 1896, he emerged as a dominant force in the Democratic Party, standing three times as the party's nominee for President of the United States in the 1896, 1900, and 1908 elections.
In a re-match of the 1896 race, Republican President William McKinley defeated his Democratic challenger, William Jennings Bryan.

1908 United States presidential election

19081908 presidential election1908 election
Beginning in 1896, he emerged as a dominant force in the Democratic Party, standing three times as the party's nominee for President of the United States in the 1896, 1900, and 1908 elections. Bryan won his party's nomination in the 1908 presidential election, but he was defeated by Roosevelt's chosen successor, William Howard Taft.
Secretary of War and Republican Party nominee William Howard Taft defeated three-time Democratic nominee William Jennings Bryan.

Scopes Trial

Scopes Monkey TrialScopes "Monkey" TrialMonkey Trial
Just before his death, he gained national attention for attacking the teaching of evolution in the Scopes Trial.
William Jennings Bryan, three-time presidential candidate, argued for the prosecution, while Clarence Darrow, the famed defense attorney, spoke for Scopes.

1896 Democratic National Convention

Democratic National Convention18961896 convention
At the 1896 Democratic National Convention, Bryan delivered his "Cross of Gold speech" which attacked the gold standard and the eastern moneyed interests and crusaded for inflationary policies built around the expanded coinage of silver coins.
The 1896 Democratic National Convention, held at the Chicago Coliseum from July 7 to July 11, was the scene of William Jennings Bryan's nomination as the Democratic presidential candidate for the 1896 U.S. presidential election.

People's Party (United States)

PopulistPopulist PartyPeople's Party
Subsequently, Bryan was also nominated for president by the left-wing Populist Party, and many Populists would eventually follow Bryan into the Democratic Party.
The Populist Party emerged in the early 1890s as an important force in the Southern United States and the Western United States, but the party collapsed after it nominated Democrat William Jennings Bryan in the 1896 United States presidential election.

William McKinley

McKinleyPresident McKinleyPresident William McKinley
In the intensely fought 1896 presidential election, Republican nominee William McKinley emerged triumphant.
He defeated his Democratic rival William Jennings Bryan after a front porch campaign in which he advocated "sound money" (the gold standard unless altered by international agreement) and promised that high tariffs would restore prosperity.

William Howard Taft

William H. TaftTaftWilliam Taft
Bryan won his party's nomination in the 1908 presidential election, but he was defeated by Roosevelt's chosen successor, William Howard Taft.
With Roosevelt's help, Taft had little opposition for the Republican nomination for president in 1908 and easily defeated William Jennings Bryan for the presidency that November.

1904 United States presidential election

19041904 presidential election1904 election
Bryan's influence in the party weakened after the 1900 election and the Democrats nominated the conservative Alton B. Parker in the 1904 presidential election.
The conservative Bourbon Democrat allies of former President Grover Cleveland temporarily regained control of the Democratic Party from the followers of William Jennings Bryan, and the 1904 Democratic National Convention nominated Alton B. Parker, Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals.

1912 United States presidential election

19121912 presidential election1912 election
After the Democrats won the presidency in the 1912 election, Woodrow Wilson rewarded Bryan's support with the important cabinet position of Secretary of State.
On the Democratic side, Wilson won the presidential nomination on the 46th ballot, defeating Speaker of the House Champ Clark and several other candidates with the support of William Jennings Bryan and other progressive Democrats.

Progressive Era

ProgressiveProgressive movementProgressives
Since his death in 1925, Bryan has elicited mixed reactions from various commentators, but he is widely considered to have been one of the most influential figures of the Progressive Era.
The national political leaders included Republicans Theodore Roosevelt, Robert M. La Follette Sr. and Charles Evans Hughes, and Democrats William Jennings Bryan, Woodrow Wilson and Al Smith.

Woodrow Wilson

WilsonPresident WilsonPresident Woodrow Wilson
He also served in the United States House of Representatives and as the United States Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson.
In the 1896 presidential election, Wilson rejected Democratic nominee William Jennings Bryan and supported the conservative "Gold Democrat" nominee, John M. Palmer.

Mary Baird Bryan

Mary BairdMary E. BairdMary Elizabeth Baird
In 1879, while still in college, Bryan met Mary Elizabeth Baird, the daughter of an owner of a nearby general store and began courting her.
She was the wife of William Jennings Bryan.

Free silver

free coinage of silverFree Silver movementunlimited coinage of silver
At the 1896 Democratic National Convention, Bryan delivered his "Cross of Gold speech" which attacked the gold standard and the eastern moneyed interests and crusaded for inflationary policies built around the expanded coinage of silver coins.
Free silver was the central issue for Democrats in the presidential elections of 1896 and 1900, under the leadership of William Jennings Bryan, famed for his Cross of Gold speech in favor of free silver.

Illinois College

BlueboysJacksonville Female AcademyLady Blues
After graduating from Whipple Academy, Bryan entered Illinois College, which was also located in Jacksonville.
William Jennings Bryan, a member of the class of 1881, is one of the most prominent alumni of Illinois College.

James B. Weaver

James WeaverJames Baird WeaverWeaver
Bryan sought re-election in 1892 with the support of many Populists and he backed Populist presidential candidate James B. Weaver instead of the Democratic presidential candidate, Grover Cleveland.
The Populists merged with the Democrats by the end of the 19th century, and Weaver went with them, promoting the candidacy of William Jennings Bryan for president in 1896, 1900, and 1908.

Cross of Gold speech

Cross of Gold" speechCross of GoldCross of Gold and Crown of Thorns
At the 1896 Democratic National Convention, Bryan delivered his "Cross of Gold speech" which attacked the gold standard and the eastern moneyed interests and crusaded for inflationary policies built around the expanded coinage of silver coins.
The Cross of Gold speech was delivered by William Jennings Bryan, a former United States Representative from Nebraska, at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago on July 9, 1896.

Gold standard

goldgold exchange standardbacked by gold
At the 1896 Democratic National Convention, Bryan delivered his "Cross of Gold speech" which attacked the gold standard and the eastern moneyed interests and crusaded for inflationary policies built around the expanded coinage of silver coins.
During the latter part of the nineteenth century the use of silver and a return to the bimetallic standard were recurrent political issues, raised especially by William Jennings Bryan, the People's Party and the Free Silver movement.

Bourbon Democrat

Bourbon DemocratsBourbonBourbons
In a repudiation of incumbent President Grover Cleveland and his conservative Bourbon Democrats, the Democratic convention nominated Bryan for president, making Bryan the youngest major party presidential nominee in U.S. history.
Southerner Woodrow Wilson, who had been a Bourbon, made a deal in 1912 with the leading opponent of the Bourbons, William Jennings Bryan; Bryan endorsed Wilson for the Democratic nomination and Wilson named Bryan Secretary of State.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltPresident Theodore RooseveltRoosevelt
Bryan regained his stature in the party after Parker's resounding defeat by Theodore Roosevelt and voters from both parties increasingly embraced the progressive reforms that had long been championed by Bryan.
In the 1896 presidential election, Roosevelt backed Speaker of the House Thomas Brackett Reed for the Republican nomination, but William McKinley won the nomination and defeated William Jennings Bryan in the general election.

Adlai Stevenson I

Adlai E. StevensonAdlai E. Stevenson IAdlai Stevenson
Bryan hoped to offer himself as a presidential candidate, but his youth and relative inexperience gave him a lower profile than veteran Democrats like Bland, Governor Horace Boies of Iowa and Vice President Adlai Stevenson.
In 1900, he ran for vice president with William Jennings Bryan.

National Democratic Party (United States)

National DemocraticNational Democratic PartyGold Democrats
Conservative Democrats known as the "Gold Democrats" nominated a separate ticket.
The National Democratic Party, also known as Gold Democrats, was a short-lived political party of Bourbon Democrats who opposed the regular party nominee William Jennings Bryan in the 1896 presidential election.

Salem, Illinois

SalemSalem, IL
William Jennings Bryan was born in Salem, Illinois, on March 19, 1860, to Silas Lillard Bryan and Mariah Elizabeth (Jennings) Bryan.

Mark Hanna

Marcus A. HannaMarcus HannaMarcus Alonzo Hanna
McKinley and his campaign manager, Mark Hanna, knew that McKinley could not match Bryan's oratorical skills.
The Democrats nominated former Nebraska Congressman William Jennings Bryan, who ran on a bimetallism, or "Free Silver", platform.