William Kidd

Captain KiddCaptain William KiddWilliam "Captain" KiddKiddtreasure of Captain KiddWilliam Kid
William Kidd, also known as Captain William Kidd or simply Captain Kidd (c. 1655 – 23 May 1701), was a Scottish sailor who was tried and executed for piracy after returning from a voyage to the Indian Ocean.wikipedia
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Jean Fantin

By 1689, Kidd was a member of a French–English pirate crew sailing the Caribbean under Captain Jean Fantin.
He is best known for having his ship stolen by William Kidd and Robert Culliford.

Privateer

privateersprivateeringcorsair
Later, during the War of the Grand Alliance, on commissions from the provinces of New York and Massachusetts Bay, Kidd captured an enemy privateer off the New England coast.
William Kidd accepted a commission from the British king William to hunt pirates but was later hanged for piracy.

Robert Culliford

Captain Robert Culliford
Shortly afterwards, he was awarded £150 for successful privateering in the Caribbean, and one year later, Captain Robert Culliford, a notorious pirate, stole Kidd's ship while he was ashore at Antigua in the West Indies. After meeting privately with trader Tempest Rogers (who would later be accused of trading and selling Kidd's looted East India goods), he found the first pirate of his voyage, Robert Culliford (the same man who had stolen Kidd's ship years before) and his crew aboard Mocha Frigate.
1666 - ?, last name occasionally Collover) was an English pirate from Cornwall who is best remembered for repeatedly checking the designs of Captain William Kidd.

Thomas Tew

first pirateTommy Tew
On 11 December 1695, Bellomont was governing New York, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire, and he asked the "trusty and well beloved Captain Kidd" to attack Thomas Tew, John Ireland, Thomas Wake, William Maze, and all others who associated themselves with pirates, along with any enemy French ships.
Many other infamous pirates followed in his path, including Henry Every and William Kidd.

Nevis

Nevis IslandIsland of NevisCharlestown
During one of their voyages, Kidd and other crew members mutinied, ousting the captain and sailing to the British colony of Nevis.
Three privateers (William Kidd being one of them) were employed by the British Crown to help protect ships in Nevis' waters.

Adventure Galley

The new ship, Adventure Galley, was well suited to the task of catching pirates, weighing over 284 tons burthen and equipped with 34 cannon, oars, and 150 men.
Adventure Galley, also known as Adventure, was an English sailing ship captained by William Kidd, the notorious privateer.

Richard Coote, 1st Earl of Bellomont

Governor BellomontLord Bellomontthe Earl of Bellomont
In 1695, William III of England appointed Richard Coote, 1st Earl of Bellomont, governor in place of the corrupt Benjamin Fletcher, who was known for accepting bribes to allow illegal trading of pirate loot.
He was a major financial sponsor of William Kidd, whose privateering was later deemed to have descended into piracy.

Trinity Church (Manhattan)

Trinity ChurchTrinity Church, New YorkTrinity Church Wall Street
In New York City, Kidd was active in the building of Trinity Church, New York.
According to historical records, Captain William Kidd lent the runner and tackle from his ship for hoisting the stones.

Benjamin Fletcher

Governor Benjamin FletcherFletcherGov. Fletcher
In 1695, William III of England appointed Richard Coote, 1st Earl of Bellomont, governor in place of the corrupt Benjamin Fletcher, who was known for accepting bribes to allow illegal trading of pirate loot.
One of the most well-known privateers of the era was Captain William Kidd, later hanged in England after being convicted of piracy.

Hendrick van der Heul

Among Kidd's officers was his quartermaster Hendrick van der Heul.
Hendrick van der Heul (14 May 1676 – c. 1762) was a Dutch privateer who served with Captain William Kidd as his quartermaster.

Quedagh Merchant

Adventure PrizeQuedah Merchant
On 30 January 1698, Kidd raised French colours and took his greatest prize, the 400-ton Quedagh Merchant, an Indian ship hired by Armenian merchants that was loaded with satins, muslins, gold, silver, an incredible variety of East Indian merchandise, as well as extremely valuable silks.
The ship was captured by Scottish privateer, William "Captain" Kidd on 30 January 1698.

Robert Livingston the Elder

Robert LivingstonLivingstonRobert Livingston, first Lord of the manor of Livingston
Kidd and his acquaintance Colonel Robert Livingston orchestrated the whole plan; they sought additional funding from a merchant named Sir Richard Blackham.
In 1696, Livingston backed Captain William Kidd's privateer voyage on the Adventure Galley.

Tempest Rogers

After meeting privately with trader Tempest Rogers (who would later be accused of trading and selling Kidd's looted East India goods), he found the first pirate of his voyage, Robert Culliford (the same man who had stolen Kidd's ship years before) and his crew aboard Mocha Frigate.
He is best known for his association with William Kidd.

Greenock

Greenock, ScotlandGreenock, InverclydeGreenock, Renfrewshire
Greenock was given as his place of birth (although some say it was Dundee), and his age as 41 in testimony under oath at the High Court of the Admiralty in October 1694 or 1695.
Pirate William Kidd claimed on death row that he was born in Greenock, but subsequent evidence has shown that he was born either in Belfast or Dundee.

Buried treasure

treasure chesttreasure buriedtreasure chests
The belief that Kidd had left buried treasure contributed considerably to the growth of his legend.
The only pirate known to have actually buried treasure was William Kidd, who is believed to have buried at least some of his wealth on Gardiners Island near Long Island before sailing into New York City.

William Burke (pirate)

William Burke
Realizing that Adventure Prize was a marked vessel, he cached it in the Caribbean Sea, sold off his remaining plundered goods through pirate and fence William Burke, and continued toward New York aboard a sloop.
William Burke (died 1699, first name occasionally Thomas, last name occasionally Burk, Burt, Bourck, Burch, or Burcke) was an Irish pirate and trader active in the Caribbean and near Newfoundland, best known for aiding William Kidd.

Cutlass

cutlasseshangerhunting hanger
Acts of savagery on Kidd's part were reported by escaped prisoners, who told stories of being hoisted up by the arms and "drubbed" (thrashed) with a drawn cutlass.
However, the subsequent use of cutlasses by pirates is well documented in contemporary sources, notably by the pirate crews of William Fly, William Kidd, and Stede Bonnet.

Giles Shelley

Some of his crew later returned to America on their own as passengers aboard Giles Shelley's ship Nassau.
Many of the pirates had sailed under Dirk Chivers, Robert Culliford, or William Kidd.

John Somers, 1st Baron Somers

SomersLord SomersJohn Somers
Four-fifths of the cost for the venture was paid for by noble lords, who were among the most powerful men in England: the Earl of Orford, the Baron of Romney, the Duke of Shrewsbury, and Sir John Somers.
Hitherto Somers's character had kept him free from attack at the hands of political opponents; but his connection in 1699 with the notorious Captain William Kidd, to the cost of whose expedition Somers had given £1,000, afforded an opportunity; the vote of censure, however, proposed upon him in the House of Commons for giving Kidd a commission under the great seal was rejected by 199 to 131.

Captain Kidd (song)

Captain KiddCaptain Kid's Farewell to the Seas, or, the Famous Pirate's LamentCaptain Kidd" (song)
The 1701 broadside song "Captain Kid's Farewell to the Seas, or, the Famous Pirate's Lament" lists "Two hundred bars of gold, and rix dollars manifold, we seized uncontrolled".
"The Ballad of Captain Kidd" (or simply, "Captain Kidd") is an English song about Captain William Kidd, who was executed for piracy in London on May 23, 1701.

Gibbeting

gibbetgibbetedgibbets
His body was gibbeted over the River Thames at Tilbury Point – as a warning to future would-be pirates – for three years.
In London, Execution Dock is located on the north bank of the River Thames in Wapping; after tidal immersion, particularly notorious criminals' bodies could be hung in cages a little farther downstream at either Cuckold's Point or Blackwall Point, as a warning to other waterborne criminals of the possible consequences of their actions (such a fate befell Captain William Kidd in May 1701).

Treasure Island

novelnovel of the same namethe novel
This belief made its contributions to literature in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Gold-Bug"; Washington Irving's "The Devil and Tom Walker"; Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island and Nelson DeMille's Plum Island.

The Devil and Tom Walker

This belief made its contributions to literature in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Gold-Bug"; Washington Irving's "The Devil and Tom Walker"; Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island and Nelson DeMille's Plum Island.
The story first recounts the legend of the pirate, William Kidd, who is rumored to have buried a large treasure in a forest in colonial Massachusetts.

Newgate Prison

NewgateNewgate GaolNewgate Jail
Whilst awaiting trial, Kidd was confined in the infamous Newgate Prison, and wrote several letters to King William requesting clemency.

Charles Island

Charles
It also gave impetus to the constant treasure hunts conducted on Oak Island in Nova Scotia; in Suffolk County, Long Island in New York where Gardiner's Island is located; Charles Island in Milford, Connecticut; the Thimble Islands in Connecticut; Cockenoe Island in Westport, Connecticut; and on the island of Grand Manan in the Bay of Fundy.
The WPA History of Milford indicates that Captain William Kidd visited Milford in 1699 when he was en route to Boston (where he was subsequently arrested for piracy and murder).