William Osler

Sir William OslerOsler Housethe Osler Medical ServiceOslerOsler Medical ServiceOsler of Norham GardensOsler, WilliamSir William OsleSir William Osler (first Baronet)Sir William Osler, MD
Sir William Osler, 1st Baronet, (July 12, 1849 – December 29, 1919) was a Canadian physician and one of the four founding professors of Johns Hopkins Hospital.wikipedia
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History of Medicine Society

History of Medicine SectionThe History of Medicine Society at The Royal Society of Medicine, LondonHistory of Medicine Society at The Royal Society of Medicine, London
One of his achievements was the founding of the History of Medicine Society (previously section) of the Royal Society of Medicine, London.
Founded by Sir William Osler in 1912, the History of Medicine Society (formally 'section'), at the Royal Society of Medicine (RSM), London, is one of the oldest History of Medicine societies in the world and is one of the four founder committees of the British Society for the History of Medicine.

Physicians in Canada

physicianCanadiansurgeon
Sir William Osler, 1st Baronet, (July 12, 1849 – December 29, 1919) was a Canadian physician and one of the four founding professors of Johns Hopkins Hospital.
In the mid-1870s, Sir William Osler changed the face of medical school instruction with the introduction of the hands-on approach.

Residency (medicine)

residencyresidentresidents
Osler created the first residency program for specialty training of physicians, and he was the first to bring medical students out of the lecture hall for bedside clinical training.
The first formal residency programs were established by Sir William Osler and William Stewart Halsted at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Britton Bath Osler

The Oslers had several children, including William, Britton Bath Osler, and Sir Edmund Boyd Osler.
The older of three famous brothers (the other two being Edmund Boyd Osler and Sir William Osler), he was born in Bond Head, Canada West.

Johns Hopkins Hospital

Johns HopkinsThe Johns Hopkins HospitalJohns Hopkins University Hospital
Sir William Osler, 1st Baronet, (July 12, 1849 – December 29, 1919) was a Canadian physician and one of the four founding professors of Johns Hopkins Hospital.
They were pathologist William Henry Welch, surgeon William Stewart Halsted, internist William Osler, and gynecologist Howard Atwood Kelly.

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineJohns Hopkins Medical SchoolJohns Hopkins Medicine
Shortly afterwards, in 1893, Osler was instrumental in the creation of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and became one of the school's first professors of medicine.
The founding physicians (the "Four Doctors") of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine included pathologist William Henry Welch (1850-1934), the first dean of the school and a mentor to generations of research scientists; a Canadian, internist Sir William Osler (1849-1919), regarded as the Father of Modern Medicine, having been perhaps the most influential physician of the late 19th and early 20th centuries as author of The Principles and Practice of Medicine (1892), written at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and published for more than a century; surgeon William Stewart Halsted (1852-1922), who revolutionized surgery by insisting on subtle skill and technique, as well as strict adherence to sanitary procedures; and gynecologist Howard Atwood Kelly (1858-1943), a superb gynecological surgeon credited with establishing gynecology as a specialty and being among the first to use radium to treat cancer.

Association of American Physicians

Kober medalGeorge M. Kober MedalAAP
In 1884, he was appointed Chair of Clinical Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and in 1885, was one of the seven founding members of the Association of American Physicians, a society dedicated to "the advancement of scientific and practical medicine."
The Association of American Physicians (AAP) is an honorary medical society founded in 1885 by the Canadian physician Sir William Osler and six other distinguished physicians of his era for "the advancement of scientific and practical medicine."

McGill University Faculty of Medicine

Faculty of MedicineMcGill University Medical SchoolDepartment of Social Studies of Medicine
Osler left the Toronto School of Medicine after being accepted to the MDCM program at McGill University Faculty of Medicine in Montreal and he received his medical degree (MDCM) in 1872.
Sir William Dawson, the principal of McGill, was instrumental in garnering resources for the faculty and pioneering contributions from Thomas Roddick, Francis Shepherd, George Ross and Sir William Osler helped to transform the Victorian era medical school into a leader in modern medical education.

Trinity College School

Trinity CollegeTrinity College School, in Weston
He was educated at Trinity College School (then located in Weston, Ontario) and entered Trinity College, Toronto (now part of the University of Toronto) in the autumn of 1867.
Among its notable alumni are The Honourable Mr. Justice Ian Binnie, William Bridges, Edgar Bronfman, Sr., Ian Brown, Lew Cirne, Rafay Ahmed, Reginald Fessenden, Roy Heenan, Peter Jennings, Archibald Lampman, Archibald Cameron Macdonell, Yann Martel, Mark McKinney, David Macfarlane, Sir William Osler, Peter Raymont, Godfrey D. Rhodes, Casimir Cartwright van Straubenzee, Charles Taylor and Lindsey Deluce.

Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine

In January 1919 he was appointed President of the Fellowship of Medicine and was also in October 1919 appointed founding President of the merged Fellowship of Medicine and Postgraduate Medical Association, now the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine.
It was founded in late 1918 as the Inter-allied Fellowship of Medicine with Sir William Osler as its President.

McGill University

McGillMcGill CollegeRoyal Institution for the Advancement of Learning
The largest collection of Osler's letters and papers is at the Osler Library of McGill University in Montreal and a collection of his papers is also held at the United States National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. He willed his library to the Faculty of Medicine of McGill University where it now forms the nucleus of McGill University's Osler Library of the History of Medicine, which opened in 1929.
In addition, McGill alumni and professors, Sir William Osler and Howard Atwood Kelly, were among the four founders and early faculty members of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Medical Library Association

Academy of Health Information ProfessionalsJournal of the Medical Library AssociationBulletin of the Medical Library Association
He was instrumental in founding the Medical Library Association in North America, alongside employee and mentee Marcia Croker Noyes, and served as its second president from 1901–1904.
Two of the eight founding members were Canadians, William Osler and Margaret Ridley Charlton.

Pneumonia

bronchopneumoniabronchial pneumoniaNecrotizing pneumonia
In the 3rd edition of his Textbook, he also coined the description of pneumonia as "the old man's friend" since it allowed elderly individuals a quick, comparatively painless death.
Pneumonia was regarded by William Osler in the 19th century as "the captain of the men of death".

Edmund Boyd Osler (Ontario politician)

Edmund Boyd OslerSir Edmund Boyd OslerSir Edmund Osler
The Oslers had several children, including William, Britton Bath Osler, and Sir Edmund Boyd Osler.
His brothers were Britton Bath Osler (founder of Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt), and doctor Sir William Osler.

Osler Library of the History of Medicine

Osler LibraryOslerOsler Library of the History of the Medicine
He willed his library to the Faculty of Medicine of McGill University where it now forms the nucleus of McGill University's Osler Library of the History of Medicine, which opened in 1929.
The nucleus of the Library is the collection of 8,000 rare and historic works on the history of medicine and allied subjects presented to the Faculty of Medicine of McGill University by Sir William Osler (1849–1919).

The Principles and Practice of Medicine

Principles and Practice of Medicinethis textbook
His most famous work, 'The Principles and Practice of Medicine' quickly became a key text to students and clinicians alike.
The Principles and Practice of Medicine: Designed for the Use of Practitioners and Students of Medicine is a medical textbook by Sir William Osler.

Harvey Cushing

Harvey Williams CushingDr. Harvey CushingCushing
In 1925, a biography of William Osler was written by Harvey Cushing, who received the 1926 Pulitzer Prize for the work.
He wrote a biography of William Osler in three volumes.

James Bovell

At the time, however, he was becoming increasingly interested in medical science, under the influence of James Bovell, and Rev. William Arthur Johnson, who both became major influences for Osler at this time, encouraging him to switch his career.
He became an early mentor of the famous physician William Osler, whom he strongly influenced in his early years.

Marcia Croker Noyes

Marcia C. NoyesMarcia Crocker Noyes
He was instrumental in founding the Medical Library Association in North America, alongside employee and mentee Marcia Croker Noyes, and served as its second president from 1901–1904.
In 1896, Sir William Osler, MD became the President of The Maryland State Medical Society and began his search for an "intelligent, dedicated, full-time medical librarian" to meet the increased demand for medical library services and oversee a steadily growing collection of 7,000 volumes.

Journal club

Here he created the first formal journal club.
Sir William Osler established the first formalized journal club at McGill University in Montreal in 1875.

Michael Bliss

Bliss, Michael
A later biography by Michael Bliss was published in 1999.
Though his early works focused on business and political history, he subsequently authored several important medical biographies, including of Sir William Osler.

Dundas, Ontario

DundasDundas ValleyTown of Dundas
William Osler was born in Bond Head, Canada West (now Ontario) on July 12, 1849, and raised after 1857 in Dundas, Ontario.

Religio Medici

Osler lived with Bovell for a time, and through Johnson, he was introduced to the writings of Sir Thomas Browne; his Religio Medici caused a deep impression on him.
The book strongly influenced the prominent physician William Osler in his early years.

Trinity College, Toronto

Trinity CollegeUniversity of Trinity CollegeTrinity University
He was educated at Trinity College School (then located in Weston, Ontario) and entered Trinity College, Toronto (now part of the University of Toronto) in the autumn of 1867.

William Arthur Johnson

At the time, however, he was becoming increasingly interested in medical science, under the influence of James Bovell, and Rev. William Arthur Johnson, who both became major influences for Osler at this time, encouraging him to switch his career.
There, he established a school in 1865 that was to become Trinity College School in Weston, Ontario, where William Osler became a student.