William Paterson (judge)

William PatersonPatersonJudge William PatersonJustice William PatersonPaterson, William
William Paterson (December 24, 1745 – September 9, 1806) was a New Jersey statesman and a signer of the United States Constitution.wikipedia
175 Related Articles

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate JusticeJusticeAssociate Justice of the Supreme Court
He was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court and the second governor of New Jersey.

Constitutional Convention (United States)

Constitutional ConventionPhiladelphia ConventionConstitutional Convention of 1787
He represented New Jersey at the 1787 Philadelphia Convention, where he proposed the New Jersey Plan, which would have provided for equal representation among the states in Congress.
Several broad outlines were proposed and debated, most notably James Madison's Virginia Plan and William Paterson's New Jersey Plan.

List of governors of New Jersey

GovernorGovernor of New JerseyNew Jersey Governor
He was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court and the second governor of New Jersey.

American Whig–Cliosophic Society

American Whig-Cliosophic SocietyJames Madison Award for Distinguished Public ServiceCliosophic Society
He also stayed connected to his alma mater and helped found the Cliosophic Society with Aaron Burr.
Its precursors, the American Whig Society and the Cliosophic Society, were founded at Princeton in 1769 and 1765 by James Madison, William Paterson, Oliver Ellsworth, and Aaron Burr.

New Jersey Plan

He represented New Jersey at the 1787 Philadelphia Convention, where he proposed the New Jersey Plan, which would have provided for equal representation among the states in Congress.
The New Jersey Plan (also known as the Small State Plan or the Paterson Plan) was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government presented by William Paterson at the Constitutional Convention on June 15, 1787.

Resignation from the United States Senate

resignedresign from the U.S. Senateresign his Senate seat
In 1790, he became the first person ever to resign from the U.S. Senate, when he did so in order to succeed fellow signer William Livingston as governor of New Jersey.
The first resignation from the Senate was that of William Paterson of New Jersey on November 13, 1790, who resigned in order to accept the office of Governor of New Jersey.

New Jersey Attorney General

Attorney General of New JerseyAttorney GeneralNew Jersey
He helped write the 1776 Constitution of New Jersey and served as the New Jersey Attorney General from 1776 to 1783.

Connecticut Compromise

Great Compromisecompromise on representationConnecticut Compromise (USA)
After the Great Compromise (for two legislative bodies: a Senate with equal representation for each state, and a House of Representatives with representation based on population), the Constitution was signed.
In response, on June 15, 1787, William Paterson of the New Jersey delegation proposed a legislature consisting of a single house.

Anthony Walton White

Anthony WhiteBrigadier General Anthony White
In 1785, he married Euphemia White (1746–1832), sister of Anthony Walton White (1750–1803), daughter of Anthony White (1717–1787), a New Jersey landholder and judge of the Somerset court, and the granddaughter of Lewis Morris (1671–1746), Chief Justice of New York from 1715 to 1733 and Governor of New Jersey from 1738 to 1746.
His elder sister, Euphemia White (1746–1832), was the second wife of William Paterson (1745–1806).

Paterson, New Jersey

PatersonPaterson, NJPaterson City
Both the city of Paterson, New Jersey, and the college, William Paterson University, are named after him.
Paterson was named for William Paterson, statesman, signer of the Constitution and Governor of New Jersey, who signed the 1792 charter that established the Town of Paterson.

Henry Bell Van Rensselaer

Henry Van RensselaerHenry B. Van Rensselaer
Through his eldest daughter, his grandchildren included Cortlandt Van Rensselaer (1808–1860), a noted Presbyterian clergyman, and Henry Bell Van Rensselaer (1810–1864), a politician and general in the Union Army during the American Civil War, who married Elizabeth Ray King, a granddaughter of U.S. Senator Rufus King.
His mother, Cornelia Paterson, was the daughter of William Paterson, who served as Governor of New Jersey and an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

William Paterson University

William PatersonWilliam Paterson CollegeWilliam Paterson University of New Jersey
Both the city of Paterson, New Jersey, and the college, William Paterson University, are named after him.
The change of name honored William Paterson, who was the state's first senator, its second governor, and a United States Supreme Court Justice appointed by President George Washington, and reflected both the institution's beginnings in the city that also bears his name and the legislative mandate to move from a teachers' college to a broad-based liberal arts institution.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
He was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court and the second governor of New Jersey. President George Washington nominated Paterson for the Supreme Court of the United States on February 27, 1793, to the seat vacated by Thomas Johnson.
There have been six foreign-born justices in the Court's history: James Wilson (1789–1798), born in Caskardy, Scotland; James Iredell (1790–1799), born in Lewes, England; William Paterson (1793–1806), born in County Antrim, Ireland; David Brewer (1889–1910), born to American missionaries in Smyrna, Ottoman Empire (now Izmir, Turkey); George Sutherland (1922–1939), born in Buckinghamshire, England; and Felix Frankfurter (1939–1962), born in Vienna, Austria.

Demographics of the Supreme Court of the United States

List of Jewish United States Supreme Court justicesdemographics of the Supreme CourtDemographics of the U.S. Supreme Court
These included James Wilson, born in Fife, Scotland; James Iredell, born in Lewes, England; and William Paterson, born in County Antrim, Ireland.

Albany Rural Cemetery

Rural Cemetery
When the city acquired the property, Paterson's remains were relocated to Albany Rural Cemetery Menands in Albany County, New York.

Stephen Van Rensselaer

Stephen Van Rensselaer IIIVan RensselaerMajor General Stephen Van Rensselaer
He was on his way to the spa at Ballston Springs, New York, to "take the waters", when he died at the Van Rensselaer Manor home of his daughter, Cornelia, and son-in-law, Stephen Van Rensselaer, in Albany, New York.
After Schuyler's death in 1801, he married Cornelia Bell Paterson in 1802, the daughter of William Paterson, the 2nd Governor of New Jersey, and later, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Thomas Johnson (jurist)

Thomas JohnsonThomasTh. Johnson Jun r
President George Washington nominated Paterson for the Supreme Court of the United States on February 27, 1793, to the seat vacated by Thomas Johnson.

Henry Brockholst Livingston

Brockholst LivingstonHenry B. LivingstonLivingston
Two years later, on November 10, 1806, Livingston received a recess appointment to the Supreme Court of the United States from Thomas Jefferson, to a seat vacated by William Paterson.

Charles King (Columbia University president)

Charles KingCharles King (academic)
Through his son, his grandchildren included twin brothers, William Paterson (1817–1899), who married Salvadora Meade, a Spanish-born woman living in Philadelphia, and Stephen Van Rensselaer Paterson (1817–1872), who married Emily Sophia King (1823–1853), daughter of Charles King (1789–1867), the president of Columbia University, and the second son Rufus King.

List of United States Supreme Court Justices by time in office

List of U.S. Supreme Court Justices by time in officelongest-serving justice in Supreme Court historybriefest tenure