William Rehnquist

William H. RehnquistRehnquistChief Justice RehnquistJustice RehnquistChief Justice William RehnquistRehnquist JWilliam Hubbs RehnquistJustice William RehnquistWilliam Rehnquist’sChief Justice Rehinquist
William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American jurist and lawyer who served on the Supreme Court of the United States for 33 years, first as an Associate Justice from 1972 to 1986 and then as Chief Justice from 1986 until his death in 2005.wikipedia
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Rehnquist Court

Rehnquist
He became an intellectual and social leader of the Rehnquist Court, earning respect even from the Justices who frequently opposed his opinions.
The Rehnquist Court refers to the Supreme Court of the United States from 1986 to 2005, when William Rehnquist served as Chief Justice of the United States.

Burger Court

Burger
Rehnquist quickly established himself as the most conservative member of the Burger Court.
Burger succeeded Earl Warren as Chief Justice after the latter's retirement, and Burger served as Chief Justice until his retirement, at which point William Rehnquist was nominated and confirmed as Burger's replacement.

Stanford Law School

Stanford University Law SchoolStanfordStanford Law
After the war's end in 1945, Rehnquist studied political science at Stanford University and Harvard University, then earned a law degree from the Stanford Law School. He later returned to Stanford, and graduated from the Stanford Law School in the same class as Sandra Day O'Connor, with whom he would serve on the Supreme Court.
Other justices of supreme courts who graduated from Stanford Law include the late Chief Justice of the United States William Rehnquist, retired Chief Justice of California Ronald M. George, retired California Supreme Court Justice Carlos R. Moreno, and the late California Supreme Court Justice Frank K. Richardson.

John Marshall Harlan (1899–1971)

John Marshall Harlan IIJustice HarlanHarlan
In 1971, Nixon nominated Rehnquist to succeed Associate Justice John Marshall Harlan II, and Rehnquist won Senate confirmation that same year. In fall 1971, Nixon received the resignations of two Supreme Court justices, Hugo Black and John Marshall Harlan II.
After Harlan's retirement, President Nixon appointed William Rehnquist to replace him.

Impeachment of Bill Clinton

impeachmentimpeachment trialClinton impeachment
As Chief Justice, Rehnquist presided over the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton.
A trial in the Senate began in January 1999, with Chief Justice William Rehnquist presiding.

United States v. Lopez

possession of guns in school zonesU.S. v. Lopez
Rehnquist wrote the majority opinions in United States v. Lopez (1995) and United States v. Morrison (2000), holding in both cases that Congress had exceeded its power under the Commerce Clause.
In a majority decision joined by four other justices, Chief Justice William Rehnquist held that while Congress had broad lawmaking authority under the Commerce Clause, that power did not extend to the regulation of the carrying of handguns.

United States v. Morrison

Antonio MorrisonU.S. v. MorrisonChristy Brzonkala
Rehnquist wrote the majority opinions in United States v. Lopez (1995) and United States v. Morrison (2000), holding in both cases that Congress had exceeded its power under the Commerce Clause.
In a majority opinion joined by four other justices, Chief Justice William Rehnquist held that the Commerce Clause only gave Congress the power to regulate activities that were directly economic in nature, even if there were indirect economic consequences.

Antonin Scalia

Justice ScaliaScaliaJustice Antonin Scalia
Though he remained a member of the conservative wing of the court, Associate Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas were often regarded as more conservative.
Reagan first decided to nominate Associate Justice William Rehnquist to become Chief Justice.

Sandra Day O'Connor

Justice O'ConnorSandra Day O’ConnorO'Connor
He later returned to Stanford, and graduated from the Stanford Law School in the same class as Sandra Day O'Connor, with whom he would serve on the Supreme Court.
There, she served on the Stanford Law Review with its presiding editor-in-chief, future Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who was the class valedictorian and whom she briefly dated during law school.

Clarence Thomas

ThomasJustice ThomasJustice Clarence Thomas
Though he remained a member of the conservative wing of the court, Associate Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas were often regarded as more conservative.
He was sworn-in by Justice Byron White in a ceremony initially scheduled for October 21, but postponed due to the death of Chief Justice William Rehnquist's wife.

Roe v. Wade

right to chooseRoe vs. WadeRoe v Wade
He opposed the court's Roe v. Wade (1973) decision and continued to argue that Roe had been incorrectly decided in Planned Parenthood v. Casey (1992).
(At this point, Black and Harlan had been replaced by Justices William Rehnquist and Lewis F. Powell Jr., but they arrived too late to hear the first round of arguments.) But Blackmun felt that his opinion did not adequately reflect his liberal colleagues' views.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American jurist and lawyer who served on the Supreme Court of the United States for 33 years, first as an Associate Justice from 1972 to 1986 and then as Chief Justice from 1986 until his death in 2005.
The Rehnquist Court (1986–2005) was noted for its revival of judicial enforcement of federalism, emphasizing the limits of the Constitution's affirmative grants of power (United States v. Lopez) and the force of its restrictions on those powers (Seminole Tribe v. Florida, City of Boerne v. Flores).

Bush v. Gore

2000 election controversydisputed vote counts5-4 decision
In Bush v. Gore (2000), he voted with the court's majority to end the Florida recount.
On several occasions, William Rehnquist had expressed interest in retiring under a Republican administration; one study found that press reports "are equivocal on whether facts existed that would have created a conflict of interest" for Rehnquist.

Robert H. Jackson

Robert JacksonJacksonJustice Jackson
He clerked for Associate Justice Robert H. Jackson during the Supreme Court's 1952–1953 term, then entered private practice in Phoenix, Arizona.
One of Jackson's law clerks during 1952 – 53, William H. Rehnquist, was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1971, and became Chief Justice in 1986.

Office of Legal Counsel

Department of Justice Office of Legal CounselOffice of Legal CouncilOLC
He served as a legal adviser for Republican presidential nominee Barry Goldwater in the 1964 election, and in 1969 President Richard Nixon appointed Rehnquist as Assistant Attorney General of the Office of Legal Counsel.

Operation Eagle Eye (United States)

Operation Eagle Eye
Many years later, during the 1971 hearing for associate justice and later during the 1986 Senate hearings on his chief justice nomination, several people came forward to complain about Rehnquist's participation in Operation Eagle Eye, a Republican attempt to discourage minority voters in Arizona elections, when Rehnquist served as a poll watcher in the early 1960s.
William Rehnquist, later chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, is said to have been the head of a group of lawyers hoping to challenge voters in minority Democratic precincts.

Denison Kitchel

He began his legal work in the firm of Denison Kitchel, subsequently the national campaign manager of the Barry M. Goldwater presidential campaign in 1964.
In 1953, the young attorney William H. Rehnquist, later appointed as the Chief Justice of the United States by President Ronald W. Reagan, joined Kitchel's firm.

Barry Goldwater

Barry M. GoldwaterGoldwaterBarry Morris Goldwater
He served as a legal adviser for Republican presidential nominee Barry Goldwater in the 1964 election, and in 1969 President Richard Nixon appointed Rehnquist as Assistant Attorney General of the Office of Legal Counsel. He began his legal work in the firm of Denison Kitchel, subsequently the national campaign manager of the Barry M. Goldwater presidential campaign in 1964.
Future Chief Justice of the United States and fellow Arizonan William H. Rehnquist also first came to the attention of national Republicans through his work as a legal adviser to Goldwater's presidential campaign.

Deep Throat (Watergate)

Deep ThroatinformantDeep Bone
Because he was well-placed in the Justice Department, Rehnquist was mentioned for many years as a possibility for the source known as Deep Throat during the Watergate scandal.
But others had received more attention over the years, such as Pat Buchanan, Henry Kissinger, then-Chief Justice William Rehnquist, General Alexander Haig, and before it was revealed that "Deep Throat" was definitely not female, Diane Sawyer.

Hugo Black

BlackJustice BlackHugo L. Black
In fall 1971, Nixon received the resignations of two Supreme Court justices, Hugo Black and John Marshall Harlan II.
Black's jurisprudence is among the most distinctive of any members of the Supreme Court in history and has been influential on justices as diverse as Earl Warren, William Rehnquist, and Antonin Scalia.

Ronald Reagan

ReaganRonald W. ReaganPresident Reagan
In 1986, President Ronald Reagan nominated Rehnquist to succeed retiring Chief Justice Warren Burger, and Rehnquist again won Senate confirmation.
When Chief Justice Warren E. Burger retired in September 1986, Reagan nominated incumbent Associate Justice William Rehnquist to succeed Burger as Chief Justice (the appointment of an incumbent associate justice as chief justice is subject to a separate confirmation process).

Shorewood High School (Wisconsin)

Shorewood High SchoolShorewood StadiumShorewood
Rehnquist graduated from Shorewood High School in 1942.

Planned Parenthood v. Casey

Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. CaseyPlanned Parenthood of Southeastern Pa. v. CaseyCasey
He opposed the court's Roe v. Wade (1973) decision and continued to argue that Roe had been incorrectly decided in Planned Parenthood v. Casey (1992).
This resulted in a precarious five-Justice majority consisting of Chief Justice William Rehnquist, Byron White, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, and Clarence Thomas that favored upholding all five contested abortion restrictions.

John Roberts

John G. RobertsRobertsChief Justice Roberts
(The Lord Chancellor was traditionally the senior member of the British judiciary.) His successor, Chief Justice John Roberts, chose not to continue the practice.
He served as a law clerk for Circuit Judge Henry Friendly and then-associate justice William Rehnquist before taking a position in the Attorney General's office during the Reagan Administration.

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate JusticeJusticeAssociate Justice of the Supreme Court
William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American jurist and lawyer who served on the Supreme Court of the United States for 33 years, first as an Associate Justice from 1972 to 1986 and then as Chief Justice from 1986 until his death in 2005.