William S. Paley

Jaclyn StableWilliam PaleyBill PaleyPaleysWilliam PaileyWilliam S Paley
William Samuel Paley (September 28, 1901 – October 26, 1990) was the chief executive who built the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) from a small radio network into one of the foremost radio and television network operations in the United States.wikipedia
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CBS

Columbia Broadcasting SystemCBS TelevisionCBS-TV
William Samuel Paley (September 28, 1901 – October 26, 1990) was the chief executive who built the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) from a small radio network into one of the foremost radio and television network operations in the United States.
It has also been called the "Tiffany Network", alluding to the perceived high quality of CBS programming during the tenure of William S. Paley.

CBS News

CBSCBS Radio NewsCBSNews.com
As war clouds darkened over Europe in the late 1930s, Paley recognized Americans' desire for news coverage of the coming war and built the CBS news division into a dominant force just as he had previously built the network's entertainment division. His friendship with Edward R. Murrow, one of the leading lights in the CBS news division (and by then a vice president of CBS), suffered during the 1950s over the hard-hitting tone of the Murrow-hosted See It Now series.
In December 1930 CBS chief William S. Paley hired journalist Paul W. White away from United Press as CBS's news editor.

Frank Stanton (executive)

Frank StantonDr. Frank StantonFrank Stanton Professor
In 1946, Paley promoted Frank Stanton to president of CBS.
On that day, Stanton appeared on an hour-long special, Premiere, with Robert Alda, Faye Emerson, Ed Sullivan, Arthur Godfrey, William S. Paley and others to introduce the CBS color system.

Columbia Records

ColumbiaCBSCBS Records
CBS has owned the Columbia Record Company and its associated CBS Laboratories since 1939.
In 1938 ARC, including the Columbia label in the US, was bought by William S. Paley of the Columbia Broadcasting System for US$750,000.

RCA

Radio Corporation of AmericaRCA RecordsRCA Astrospace
They did, however, buy and license some RCA equipment and technology, taking the RCA markings off of the equipment, and later relying exclusively on Philips-Norelco for color equipment beginning in 1964, when color television sets became widespread.
But in 1948, as the transition from radio to television was beginning, NBC's leadership came under attack due to what became known as the "Paley raids", named after the president of CBS, William S. Paley.

Edward R. Murrow

Ed MurrowEdward MurrowMurrow
While based in England during the war, Paley came to know and befriend Edward R. Murrow, CBS's head of European news who expanded the news division's foreign coverage with a team of war correspondents later known as the Murrow Boys.
In December 1945 Murrow reluctantly accepted William S. Paley's offer to become a vice president of the network and head of CBS News, and made his last news report from London in March 1946.

Western Military Academy

William Paley matriculated at Western Military Academy in Alton, Illinois and later received his college degree from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in expectation that he would take an increasingly active role running the family cigar business.
William S. Paley, 1918. Chairman of the Board Columbia Broadcasting System.

La Palina

Samuel Paley's intention was to use his acquisition as an advertising medium for promoting the family's cigar business, which included the La Palina brand.
The Congress Cigar Company (run by Sam Paley, father of CBS founder William S. Paley) sponsored Kate Smith's first CBS radio network program Kate Smith and Her Swanee Music.

James T. Aubrey

James AubreyJim AubreyJames Aubry Jr.
In 1959, James T. Aubrey Jr. became the president of CBS.
His formula was characterized by a CBS executive as "broads, bosoms, and fun," resulting in such shows as The Beverly Hillbillies and Gilligan's Island, despised by the critics – and CBS chairman William S. Paley – but extremely popular with viewers.

Alton, Illinois

AltonAlton, ILIllinois (Alton)
William Paley matriculated at Western Military Academy in Alton, Illinois and later received his college degree from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in expectation that he would take an increasingly active role running the family cigar business.
William S. Paley founder and Chairman of the board of directors of CBS Corp. Graduate of Western Military Academy in Alton.

CBS Evening News

Douglas Edwards with the NewsCBSCBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite
In 1972, Paley ordered the shortening of a second installment of a two-part CBS Evening News series on the Watergate, based on a complaint by Charles Colson, an aide to President Richard Nixon.
After the first half of the report, shown on a Friday, ran for 14 minutes – roughly half of the air time of the broadcast – White House officials complained to CBS founder William S. Paley.

S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Newhouse School of Public CommunicationsS.I. Newhouse School of Public CommunicationsNewhouse School
In 1974, Paley dedicated the second building at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University.
A second building, Newhouse 2, was dedicated in 1974 with a keynote address by William S. Paley, chairman of the board of CBS.

George Steinbrenner

Kinsman StableSteinbrennerGeorge
In 1973, Paley sold the team at its low ebb for $8.7 million to Cleveland shipbuilder George Steinbrenner and a group of investors.
In 1972, CBS Chairman William S. Paley told team president E. Michael Burke the media company intended to sell the club.

Arthur Godfrey

Arthur Godfrey TimeGodfreyThe Arthur Godfrey Show
Arthur Godfrey had been working locally in Washington, DC and New York City hosting morning shows.
This included CBS chairman William S. Paley.

Babe Paley

BabeBarbara "Babe" CushingBarbara "Babe
Paley married divorcée, socialite and fashion icon Barbara "Babe" Cushing Mortimer (1915–1978) on July 28, 1947.
Barbara "Babe" Cushing Mortimer Paley (July 5, 1915 – July 6, 1978) was an American socialite and style icon, whose second husband was the founder of CBS, William S. Paley.

Museum of Modern Art

MoMAThe Museum of Modern ArtMuseum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Encouraged by Paley's avid interest in modern art and his outstanding collection, Paley became a trustee of the Rockefeller family's Museum of Modern Art in the 1930s and, in 1962, was tapped by then-chairman David Rockefeller to be its president.
MoMA's Board of Trustees included Nelson Rockefeller and William S. Paley (head of CBS), who reportedly "hit the ceiling" on seeing the proofs of the poster.

Late Show Top Ten List

Top Ten ListTop 10 listTop Ten Lists
Paley was included in a list of the ten most eligible bachelors compiled by Cosmopolitan magazine in 1985; the irony of the octogenarian Paley being on the list was an inspiration for Late Night with David Letterman's nightly Top Ten lists.
According to O'Donnell, the Top Ten List was an "almost simultaneous inspiration arriving from staffers Jim Downey, Randy Cohen and Robert “Morty” Morton — largely prompted by the ridiculous 'eligible bachelor' lists in a local New York paper that included the 84-year-old Bill Paley. 'Why, we can put such nonsense together ourselves!' we exclaimed. And we did."

Gilligan's Island

Gilligan’s Islandboating accident that led to the disappearanceclassic series
Under Aubrey, the network became the most popular on television with shows like The Beverly Hillbillies and Gilligan's Island.
Under pressure from CBS network president William S. Paley and his wife Babe, along with many network affiliates and longtime fans of Gunsmoke, CBS rescheduled the Western to an earlier time slot on Monday evenings at 7:30 p.m. As a result, Gilligan's Island was quietly cancelled at practically the last minute, while the cast members were all on vacation.

Television Hall of Fame

Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of FameAcademy of Television Arts and Sciences Hall of FameTelevision Academy Hall of Fame
Inducted into the Television Hall of Fame, 1984
The first ceremony in 1984 celebrated the careers of Lucille Ball, Milton Berle, Paddy Chayefsky, Norman Lear, Edward R. Murrow, William S. Paley and David Sarnoff.

See It Now

His friendship with Edward R. Murrow, one of the leading lights in the CBS news division (and by then a vice president of CBS), suffered during the 1950s over the hard-hitting tone of the Murrow-hosted See It Now series.
After CBS granted another such request (regarding a See It Now show on whether or not Alaska and Hawaii deserved statehood) Murrow complained to CBS head William S. Paley he could not continue doing the program if CBS continued to accede to such equal-time requests under those circumstances.

Frank Langella

In the 1986 television movie Murrow, Paley is played by Dabney Coleman, while in the 2005 film Good Night, and Good Luck, he is played by Frank Langella. In the 2006 film Infamous, Paley is played by Lee Ritchey. Paley is also portrayed by Shawn Lawrence in the 2002 television film Gleason.
His notable film roles include George Prager in Diary of a Mad Housewife (1970), Count Dracula in Dracula (1979), Skeletor in Masters of the Universe (1987), Bob Alexander in Dave (1993), William S. Paley in Good Night, and Good Luck (2005) and Richard Nixon in the film production of Frost/Nixon (2008), which earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor.

Paley Center for Media

PaleyFestMuseum of Television and RadioThe Paley Center for Media
The Paley Center for Media in Los Angeles and New York City was founded by Paley in 1976, when it was known as the Museum of Broadcasting.
The Paley Center for Media, formerly the Museum of Television & Radio (MT&R) and the Museum of Broadcasting, founded in 1975 by William S. Paley, is an American cultural institution in New York and Los Angeles dedicated to the discussion of the cultural, creative, and social significance of television, radio, and emerging platforms for the professional community and media-interested public.

Facel Vega Facel II

Facel IIFacel Vega II (optional)
Like Picasso, Paley drove an exotic French Facel Vega Facel II, the fastest four-seater car in the world in the early 1960s.
Its looks, rarity, and performance led to famous owners, including Pablo Picasso, Lionel Bart, Lord Brabourne, The Chrysler Corporation (and Mrs Carr, Walter Chrysler's daughter), Joan Collins, Tony Curtis, Christian Dior, Stanley Donen, Charlie Drake, Max Factor Jr, Joan Fontaine, Ava Gardner (who bought three), The Marchioness of Huntly (whose car had full-harness seat-belts), Herbert von Karajan, Danny Kaye, Louis Malle, The President of Mexico, Princess Grace of Monaco, Yves Montand, Hassan II King of Morocco, Baroness Sally Oppenheim-Barnes, William S. Paley, Prince Poniatowski, Anthony Quinn, Debbie Reynolds, Frank Sinatra, Ringo Starr, The Marchioness of Tavistock, François Truffaut, Count Giovanni Volpi di Misurata, Robert Wagner, Sir Mortimer Wheeler, The Shah of Persia and Sihanouk (King-Father of Cambodia).

Good Night, and Good Luck

Good Night, and Good Luck''.Good Night. And Good Luck
In the 1986 television movie Murrow, Paley is played by Dabney Coleman, while in the 2005 film Good Night, and Good Luck, he is played by Frank Langella. In the 2006 film Infamous, Paley is played by Lee Ritchey. Paley is also portrayed by Shawn Lawrence in the 2002 television film Gleason.
CBS's Chief Executive, William Paley (Frank Langella) brings this forward to Murrow, warning him that if any members of his staff are associated with communism in any way, however remotely, they would have to recuse themselves from Murrow's next story, which is a direct attack on Senator Joseph McCarthy and his crusade against Communist infiltration in the U.S. government, which some denounce as a witch hunt.

Sally Bedell Smith

Bedell, SallySmith, Sally Bedell
Sally Bedell Smith (1948- ), In All His Glory: the Life and Times of William S. Paley and the Birth of Modern Broadcasting (New York, Simon & Schuster, 1990) 782 pages
Smith's first official biography, In All His Glory, was published in 1990, chronicling the life of William S. Paley, former chairman of CBS.