William Whitelaw, 1st Viscount Whitelaw

William WhitelawWillie WhitelawViscount WhitelawThe Viscount WhitelawWhitelawWilliam Stephen Ian Whitelaw The Right Honourable '''William Whitelaw1st Viscount WhitelawLord WhitelawThe Right Honourable '''William Whitelaw'''
William Stephen Ian Whitelaw, 1st Viscount Whitelaw, (28 June 1918 – 1 July 1999), often known as Willie Whitelaw, was a British Conservative politician who served in a wide number of Cabinet positions, most notably as Home Secretary.wikipedia
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Margaret Thatcher

ThatcherBaroness ThatcherThatcherite
He served Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher throughout her leadership of the Conservative Party as Deputy Party Leader.
Jim Prior suggested Thatcher as a Shadow Cabinet member after the Conservatives' 1966 defeat, but party leader Edward Heath and Chief Whip William Whitelaw eventually chose Mervyn Pike as the Conservative Shadow Cabinet's sole woman member.

Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party (UK)

Deputy Leader of the Conservative PartydeputyDeputy Leader of the Opposition Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party
He served Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher throughout her leadership of the Conservative Party as Deputy Party Leader.

Special Category Status

political statusPrisoner of WarSpecial Category Status prisoners in Northern Ireland
During his time in Northern Ireland he introduced Special Category Status for paramilitary prisoners.
In July 1972, William Whitelaw, the British government's Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, granted Special Category Status (SCS) to all prisoners convicted of Troubles-related offences.

Penrith and The Border (UK Parliament constituency)

Penrith and The BorderPenrith and the Border constituencyPenrith & The Border
After early defeats as a candidate for the constituency of East Dunbartonshire in 1950 and 1951, he became Member of Parliament (MP) for Penrith and the Border at the 1955 general election, and represented that constituency for 28 years.
The Conservatives came close to losing the seat in a 1983 by-election, when the former cabinet minister 'Willie' Whitelaw became the leader of the House of Lords: the by-election took place a mere seven weeks after his success in the 1983 general election.

Edward Heath

Ted HeathSir Edward HeathHeath
When the Conservatives returned to power in 1970 under Edward Heath, Whitelaw was made Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons, with a seat in the cabinet.
The new cabinet included Margaret Thatcher (Education and Science), William Whitelaw (Leader of the House of Commons) and the former prime minister Alec Douglas-Home (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs).

Nairn

Nairn, Scotlandburgh of NairnInbhir Nàrann
Whitelaw was born at the family home, "Monklands", on Thurlow Road in Nairn in northeast Scotland.

Secretary of State for Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland SecretarySecretary of StateNorthern Ireland
Upon the imposition of direct rule in March 1972, he became the first Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, serving in that capacity until November 1973.

Celia Whitelaw, Viscountess Whitelaw

Celia, Viscountess Whitelaw of PenrithCelia, Viscountess Whitelaw
He died of natural causes, aged 81, in July 1999, survived by his wife of 56 years, Celia, Viscountess Whitelaw (1 January 1917 – 5 December 2011), a philanthropist/charity worker and horticulturist who had been an ATS volunteer during the Second World War.
Celia, Viscountess Whitelaw (1 January 1917 – 5 December 2011) was the wife of William “Willie” Whitelaw, MP, former Home Secretary, Deputy Prime Minister and aide to Margaret Thatcher.

William Whitelaw (Perth MP)

William WhitelawWillam Whitelaw
Whitelaw was raised by his mother, Helen (daughter of Major-General Francis Russell, of Aden), a local councillor in Nairn, and paternal grandfather, William Whitelaw (1868–1946), of Gartshore, Dunbartonshire, an Old Harrovian and alumnus of Trinity College, Cambridge, landowner, MP for Perth 1892–1895, and chairman of the London and North-Eastern Railway Company.
Whitelaw was married to Gertrude, daughter of Colonel T. C. Thompson of Milton Hall, Cumberland; they were the paternal grandparents of politician William Whitelaw, 1st Viscount Whitelaw by their son, William Alexander Whitelaw, who was killed in the First World War.

Trinity College, Cambridge

Trinity CollegeTrinityTrinity College Cambridge
Whitelaw was raised by his mother, Helen (daughter of Major-General Francis Russell, of Aden), a local councillor in Nairn, and paternal grandfather, William Whitelaw (1868–1946), of Gartshore, Dunbartonshire, an Old Harrovian and alumnus of Trinity College, Cambridge, landowner, MP for Perth 1892–1895, and chairman of the London and North-Eastern Railway Company.
Other Trinity politicians include Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, courtier of Elizabeth I; William Waddington, Prime Minister of France; Erskine Hamilton Childers, President of Ireland; Jawaharlal Nehru, the first and longest serving Prime Minister of India; Rajiv Gandhi, Prime Minister of India; Lee Hsien Loong, Prime Minister of Singapore; Samir Rifai, Prime Minister of Jordan; William Whitelaw, Margaret Thatcher's Home Secretary and subsequently Deputy Prime Minister; and Rahul Gandhi, President of the Indian National Congress.

Iranian Embassy siege

Iranian EmbassyOperation Nimrodsiege of the Iranian Embassy
He was Home Secretary during the six-day Iranian Embassy siege in April–May 1980.
The meeting was chaired by William Whitelaw, the Home Secretary, as Margaret Thatcher, the Prime Minister, was unavailable.

Wixenford School

WixenfordWixenford Preparatory School
Whitelaw was educated first at Wixenford School, Wokingham, before passing the entrance exam to Winchester College.

Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Deputy Prime MinisterBritish Deputy Prime MinisterShadow Deputy Prime Minister
In an unofficial capacity, he also served as Deputy Prime Minister in Thatcher's new government.
William Whitelaw was Margaret Thatcher's de facto deputy from 1979–1988, an unofficial position he combined with that of Home Secretary in 1979–1983 and Leader of the House of Lords after 1983.

Provisional Irish Republican Army

Provisional IRAIRAPIRA
He attempted to negotiate with the Provisional Irish Republican Army, meeting its then PIRA Chief of Staff Seán MacStiofáin in July 1972.
In July 1972, Seán Mac Stíofáin, Dáithí Ó Conaill, Ivor Bell, Seamus Twomey, Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness met a British delegation led by William Whitelaw.

Alec Douglas-Home

Sir Alec Douglas-HomeLord HomeThe Earl of Home
He held his first government posts under Harold Macmillan as a Lord of the Treasury (government whip) between 1961 and 1962 and under Macmillan and then Sir Alec Douglas-Home as Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Labour between 1962 and 1964.
Maudling and the chief whip, William Whitelaw, believed that if Heath had to resign Douglas-Home would be the safest candidate to keep Powell out.

Leader of the House of Commons

Leader of the HouseDeputy Leader of the House of CommonsLeader
When the Conservatives returned to power in 1970 under Edward Heath, Whitelaw was made Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons, with a seat in the cabinet.

1975 Conservative Party leadership election

11 February 19751975 leadership election1975 Conservative leadership election
After a second defeat in the October 1974 general election, during which Whitelaw had accused Wilson of going "round and round the country stirring up apathy", Heath was forced to call a leadership election in 1975.
Many expected the contest to be a walkover, believing there was no clear alternative to Heath after Keith Joseph had ruled himself out following controversial remarks calling on poor people to have fewer children and William Whitelaw had pledged loyalty to Heath.

Seán Mac Stíofáin

Sean MacStiofainSeán Mac StiofáinSeán MacStiofáin
He attempted to negotiate with the Provisional Irish Republican Army, meeting its then PIRA Chief of Staff Seán MacStiofáin in July 1972.
On 7 July 1972, Mac Stíofáin led an IRA delegation to a secret meeting with members of the British government, led by Secretary of State for Northern Ireland William Whitelaw, at Cheyne Walk in London.

Lord President of the Council

Lord PresidentThe Lord President of the CouncilLord President of the Privy Council
When the Conservatives returned to power in 1970 under Edward Heath, Whitelaw was made Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons, with a seat in the cabinet.

Secretary of State for Employment

Minister of LabourDepartment of EmploymentMinister of Labour and National Service
In 1973, Whitelaw left Northern Ireland—shortly before the Sunningdale Agreement was reached—to become Secretary of State for Employment, and confronted the National Union of Mineworkers over its pay demands.

Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Labour

Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of LabourParliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Labour and National ServiceParliamentary Secretary, Ministry of Labour
He held his first government posts under Harold Macmillan as a Lord of the Treasury (government whip) between 1961 and 1962 and under Macmillan and then Sir Alec Douglas-Home as Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Labour between 1962 and 1964.

Home Secretary

Secretary of State for the Home DepartmentHome SecretariesBritish Home Secretary
William Stephen Ian Whitelaw, 1st Viscount Whitelaw, (28 June 1918 – 1 July 1999), often known as Willie Whitelaw, was a British Conservative politician who served in a wide number of Cabinet positions, most notably as Home Secretary.

John Ganzoni, 2nd Baron Belstead

The Lord BelsteadLord BelsteadJohn Julian Ganzoni, 2nd Baron Belstead
He next moved to the Ministry of Fisheries and Food, and went back to the Education Department again before becoming Deputy Leader to William Whitelaw as Leader of the House of Lords.