William the Conqueror

William IWilliam I of EnglandWilliam of NormandyWilliam the BastardWilliam, Duke of NormandyWilliamKing WilliamKingKing William IConqueror
William I (c. 1028 – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087.wikipedia
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Norman conquest of England

Norman ConquestConquestNorman invasion
His hold was secure on Normandy by 1060, following a long struggle to establish his throne, and he launched the Norman conquest of England six years later.
The Norman conquest of England (in Britain, often called the Norman Conquest or the Conquest) was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England by an army of Norman, Breton, Flemish, and French soldiers led by the Duke of Normandy, later styled William the Conqueror.

Edward the Confessor

King Edward the ConfessorKing EdwardEdward III the Confessor
In the 1050s and early 1060s, William became a contender for the throne of England held by the childless Edward the Confessor, his first cousin once removed.
When Edward died in 1066, he was succeeded by Harold Godwinson, who was defeated and killed in the same year by the Normans under William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings.

Matilda of Flanders

MatildaQueen Matildahis queen
His marriage in the 1050s to Matilda of Flanders provided him with a powerful ally in the neighbouring county of Flanders.
undefined 1031 – 2 November 1083) was Queen of England and Duchess of Normandy by marriage to William the Conqueror, and sometime Regent of these realms during his absence.

Battle of Hastings

HastingsBattleThe Battle of Hastings
He decisively defeated and killed Harold at the Battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066.
The Battle of Hastings was fought on 14 October 1066 between the Norman-French army of William, the Duke of Normandy, and an English army under the Anglo-Saxon King Harold Godwinson, beginning the Norman conquest of England.

Domesday Book

Domesday SurveyDomesdayDoomsday Book
In 1086, he ordered the compilation of the Domesday Book, a survey listing all the land-holdings in England along with their pre-Conquest and current holders.
Domesday Book ( or ; Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror.

Herleva

ArletteHerleva of Falaise
William was the son of the unmarried Robert I, Duke of Normandy, by his mistress Herleva. His mother Herleva was a daughter of Fulbert of Falaise; he may have been a tanner or embalmer.
undefined 1003 – c. 1050) was a woman of the 11th century, known for three sons: William the Conqueror, an illegitimate son fathered by Robert I, Duke of Normandy; and Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain, who were both fathered by her husband Herluin de Conteville.

Harold Godwinson

King HaroldHaroldHarold II
There were other potential claimants, including the powerful English earl Harold Godwinson whom Edward named as king on his deathbed in January 1066.
Harold reigned from 6 January 1066 until his death at the Battle of Hastings, fighting the Norman invaders led by William the Conqueror during the Norman conquest of England.

Caen

Caen, France Caen in NormandyCaen commune
He died in September 1087 while leading a campaign in northern France, and was buried in Caen. In early 1047 Henry and William returned to Normandy and were victorious at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen, although few details of the actual fighting are recorded.
Caen is known for its historical buildings built during the reign of William the Conqueror, who was buried there, and for the Battle for Caen—heavy fighting that took place in and around Caen during the Battle of Normandy in 1944, destroying much of the city.

Normandy

NormanNormandy, FranceNormandie
His hold was secure on Normandy by 1060, following a long struggle to establish his throne, and he launched the Norman conquest of England six years later.
Rollo's descendant William became king of England in 1066 after defeating Harold Godwinson, the last of the Anglo-Saxon kings, at the Battle of Hastings, while retaining the fiefdom of Normandy for himself and his descendants.

Richard II, Duke of Normandy

Richard IIRichard II of NormandyDuke Richard II
In an effort to improve matters, King Æthelred the Unready took Emma, sister of Richard II, Duke of Normandy, as his second wife in 1002.
He was the paternal grandfather of William the Conqueror.

Herluin de Conteville

She later married Herluin de Conteville, with whom she had two sons – Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain – and a daughter whose name is unknown.
Herluin de Conteville (1001–1066 ), also sometimes listed as Herlwin of Conteville, was the stepfather of William the Conqueror, and the father of Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain, both of whom became prominent during William's reign.

Adelaide of Normandy

AdelaideAdelaide, 1st Countess of Albemarle
Robert also had a daughter, Adelaide, by another mistress.
1090) was the sister of William the Conqueror and was Countess of Aumale in her own right.

Odo of Bayeux

OdoOdo, Bishop of BayeuxOdo, Earl of Kent
She later married Herluin de Conteville, with whom she had two sons – Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain – and a daughter whose name is unknown.
Odo of Bayeux (died 1097), Earl of Kent and Bishop of Bayeux, was the half-brother of William the Conqueror, and was, for a time, second in power after the King of England.

House of Normandy

NormanNormandyNorman dynasty
1028 – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087.
It included the Viking Rollo and his descendants, and William the Conqueror and his heirs down through 1135.

Robert, Count of Mortain

Robert of MortainCount Robert of MortainRobert
She later married Herluin de Conteville, with whom she had two sons – Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain – and a daughter whose name is unknown.
1031–c. 1095) was a Norman nobleman and the half-brother (on his mother's side) of King William the Conqueror.

Osbern the Steward

OsbernOsbern de CréponOsbern the Seneschal
They included the duke's uncle Robert, the archbishop of Rouen, who had originally opposed the duke; Osbern, a nephew of Gunnor the wife of Richard I; and Gilbert of Brionne, a grandson of Richard I. After his accession, Robert continued Norman support for the English princes Edward and Alfred, who were still in exile in northern France.
Osbern the Steward, known in French as Osbern de Crépon († about 1040), was the Steward of two Dukes of Normandy and the father of William FitzOsbern, 1st Earl of Hereford, one of William the Conqueror's closest counsellors.

Duke of Normandy

Dukes of NormandyCount of RouenDuke
He was a descendant of Rollo and was Duke of Normandy from 1035 onward.
As late as the reign of William II (1035–87), the ruler of Normandy could style himself "prince and duke, count of Normandy" as if unsure what his title should be.

Battle of Val-ès-Dunes

the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes
In early 1047 Henry and William returned to Normandy and were victorious at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen, although few details of the actual fighting are recorded.
The Battle of Val-ès-Dunes was fought in 1047 by the combined forces of the Norman duke William I and the French king Henry I against the forces of several rebel Norman barons, led by William's cousin Guy of Brionne.

Gilbert, Count of Brionne

Gilbert of BrionneGilbertGilbert,
They included the duke's uncle Robert, the archbishop of Rouen, who had originally opposed the duke; Osbern, a nephew of Gunnor the wife of Richard I; and Gilbert of Brionne, a grandson of Richard I. After his accession, Robert continued Norman support for the English princes Edward and Alfred, who were still in exile in northern France.
He was one of the early guardians of Duke William II in his minority.

William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey

William de WarenneWilliamWilliam de Warren
The second, which included some who became William's firm supporters, such as Robert, Count of Eu, Walter Giffard, Roger of Mortemer, and William de Warenne, faced the other invading force.
He is among the few who are documented as having fought for William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

Bayeux Tapestry

Bayeaux TapestryThe Bayeux TapestryMusée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux
No authentic portrait of William has been found; the contemporary depictions of him on the Bayeux Tapestry and on his seals and coins are conventional representations designed to assert his authority.
The Bayeux Tapestry (, ; Tapisserie de Bayeux or La telle du conquest; Tapete Baiocense) is an embroidered cloth nearly 70 m long and 50 cm tall, which depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England concerning William, Duke of Normandy, and Harold, Earl of Wessex, later King of England, and culminating in the Battle of Hastings.

Battle of Varaville

Henry and Geoffrey led another invasion of Normandy in 1057 but were defeated by William at the Battle of Varaville.
The Battle of Varaville was a battle fought in 1057 by William, Duke of Normandy, against King Henry I of France and Count Geoffrey Martel of Anjou.

Geoffrey II, Count of Anjou

Geoffrey II MartelGeoffrey MartelGeoffrey II
To address the growing power of the Count of Anjou, Geoffrey Martel, William joined with King Henry in a campaign against him, the last known cooperation between the two.
He was bellicose and fought against William VII, Duke of Aquitaine, Theobald I, Count of Blois, and William, Duke of Normandy.

Roger de Montgomery

Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of ShrewsburyRoger de MontgomerieRoger of Montgomery
The historian Eleanor Searle speculates that William was raised with the three cousins who later became important in his career – William fitzOsbern, Roger de Beaumont, and Roger of Montgomery.
Roger was one of William the Conqueror's principal counsellors, playing a major role in the Council of Lillebonne.

Fulbert of Falaise

His mother Herleva was a daughter of Fulbert of Falaise; he may have been a tanner or embalmer.
Fulbert of Falaise (fl. 11th century) was the father of Herleva, mother of the illegitimate William the Conqueror, the 11th-century Duke of Normandy and King of England.