Willie Pep

Guglielmo Papaleo (September 19, 1922 – November 23, 2006) was an American professional boxer, better known as Willie Pep who held the World Featherweight championship twice between the years of 1942 and 1950.wikipedia
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International Boxing Hall of Fame

Hall of FameHall of FamerIBHOF
Pep was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990.

Boxing

boxerboxersprofessional boxer
Guglielmo Papaleo (September 19, 1922 – November 23, 2006) was an American professional boxer, better known as Willie Pep who held the World Featherweight championship twice between the years of 1942 and 1950.
Notable out-fighters include Muhammad Ali, Larry Holmes, Joe Calzaghe, Wilfredo Gómez, Salvador Sanchez, Cecilia Brækhus, Gene Tunney, Ezzard Charles, Willie Pep, Meldrick Taylor, Ricardo Lopez, Floyd Mayweather Jr., Roy Jones Jr., Sugar Ray Leonard, Miguel Vazquez, Sergio "Maravilla" Martínez, Vitali Klitschko, Wladimir Klitschko and Guillermo Rigondeaux.

Johnny Duke

Pep worked as a shoeshine boy in downtown Hartford alongside Johnny Duke.
Duke was introduced to boxing by legendary champion Willie Pep when they were both shoeshine boys in downtown Hartford.

Featherweight

feather– 57 kgfeather weight
Guglielmo Papaleo (September 19, 1922 – November 23, 2006) was an American professional boxer, better known as Willie Pep who held the World Featherweight championship twice between the years of 1942 and 1950.

Hogan Bassey

Hogan "Kid" BasseyHogan (Kid) BasseyHogan Kid Bassey
During that last period of his boxing career, he won 43 bouts and lost only five, but his only opponent of note during that time was Hogan Kid Bassey, a future World Featherweight Champion who knocked Pep out in nine rounds.
Other opponents include Billy "Spider" Kelly, Percy Lewis, Tommy Profitt, Sammy McCarthy, Ricardo Moreno, and Willie Pep.

Julie Kogon

On June 6, 1944, he fought near featherweight contender, and rated lightweight Julie Kogon before a record crowd of 7,751 in an extraordinary bout in Hartford, Connecticut, and won soundly in an eight round decision.
Before a record crowd of 7,751 on June 6, 1944, he fought the legendary featherweight Willie Pep in an extraordinary bout in Hartford, Connecticut, though he lost in an eight-round decision.

Sandy Saddler

Nineteen forty-eight was a year that would become important in Pep's life: He won 15 bouts before going into what would be the first fight of his four-fight series with Sandy Saddler.
Saddler is best known for his four-bout series with Willie Pep.

The Ring (magazine)

The RingRing MagazineThe Ring'' magazine
According to Nat Fleischer in The Ring, December 1951, this was an extremely dirty fight, with "wrestling, heeling, eye gouging, tripping, thumbing- in fact every dirty trick known to the old timers.."
Some of the boxers featured on the magazine covers have included Tommy Ryan, Salvador Sánchez, Jack Dempsey, Pancho Villa, Max Schmeling, Joe Louis, Sugar Ray Robinson, Jake LaMotta, Rocky Marciano, Willie Pep, Muhammad Ali, Alexis Argüello, Wilfred Benítez, Wilfredo Gómez, Roberto Durán, Larry Holmes, Marvin Hagler, Sugar Ray Leonard, Bud Taylor, Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Floyd Mayweather Jr., Thomas Hearns, Roy Jones Jr., Bernard Hopkins, Julio César Chávez, Félix Trinidad, Manny Pacquiao, Oscar De La Hoya, Mauro Mina, and Ricardo Mayorga.

Sammy Angott

Sammyangott
But in his seventh bout of 1943, he suffered his first defeat, at the hands of Sammy Angott, another world champion boxer.
Returning to professional boxing after five months on March 19, 1943, Angott defeated Willie Pep in a non-title bout at New York's Madison Square Garden by a ten-round unanimous decision.

Paddy DeMarco

He retained the title by beating Humberto Sierra by a knockout in 10 and he beat former world champion Paddy DeMarco, also in ten, but by decision.
It was on the 10th of that month that DeMarco fought the legendary Willie Pep, whose record was an unbelievable 131-1-1 at the time.

Willie Joyce

JoyceWilliam Joyce
He won all 16 of his bouts that year, including wins over bantamweight champions Willie Joyce and Manuel Ortiz.
Joyce also fought Willie Pep.

Sal Bartolo

He closed 1943 winning five fights in a row, including two over future world champion Sal Bartolo and one over Jackie Wilson.
He lost the championship to Willie Pep on June 7, 1946, at Madison Square Garden via 12th round KO, the last battle of the epic Bartolo-Pep trilogy.

Chalky Wright

He became the World Featherweight Champion by outpointing the defending world champ Chalky Wright over the 15 round distance.
He lost his title in a fifteen-round unanimous decision before a crowd of 19,000, Willie Pep, eight years his junior, on November 20, 1942 at Madison Square Garden.

The Ring magazine Fighter of the Year

Fighter of the YearThe RingRing Magazine Fighter of the Year
In 1945, Pep was voted Fighter of the Year by The Ring magazine.

Jackie Wilson (boxer)

Jackie Wilson
He closed 1943 winning five fights in a row, including two over future world champion Sal Bartolo and one over Jackie Wilson.
Wilson also fought the great Willie Pep.

Phil Terranova

He beat former world champion Phil Terranova to retain the title, and had a ten-round draw with Jimmy McAllister.
On February 19, 1945, he lost to Willie Pep, in a NYSAC title match at Madison Square Garden before a crowd of 10,000 in a fifteen round unanimous decision.

Jackie Graves

There are claims that Pep won the third round in his fight against Jackie Graves in a fight on July 25, 1946, without throwing a punch.
He won the Minnesota State Featherweight Title in only his seventh professional fight, and before his career was over he had fought such luminaries as Willie Pep, Glen Flanagan, Miguel Acevedo, Del Flanagan, Corky Gonzales and Redtop Davis.

Charley Riley

Chillin" Charley Riley
Riley fought Willie Pep for the featherweight championship in St Louis January 16, 1950 and was knocked out by Pep by a body punch in the fifth round.

Eddie Campagnuolo

Eddie Compo
Campagnuolo was a small (5'4") featherweight, and not a big puncher. But beginning with his professional debut at the age of 17 in August 1944, Campagnuolo ran of a string of 25 consecutive wins in less than two years. By September 1949, Campagnuolo had run his record to an impressive 57-1-3. It was then that he met the great Willie Pep in a bout for the world featherweight championship and lost by TKO in the 7th round. Campagnuolo fought until April 1955, then retired at the relatively young age of 28 years, having lost three of his last four fights.

Miguel Acevedo

Along the way Acevedo fought a number of notable opponents, including Jackie Graves, Sandy Saddler, Corky Gonzales, Glen Flanagan, Charley Riley, Willie Pep, Phil Terranova, Kid Gavilán, Redtop Davis, and others with equally stellar records.

Knockout

technical knockoutTKOKO
His final record was 229–11–1 with 65 knockouts.

Associated Press

APThe Associated PressAP Radio
1 featherweight of the 20th century by the Associated Press and ranked the No.

Great Depression

DepressionThe Great DepressionDepression era
It was during the Great Depression and Pep's father was earning $15 per week at the Works Progress Administration.