Winchelsea

New WinchelseaOld WinchelseaWinchelseyWinschelsea
Winchelsea is a small town in the non-metropolitan county of East Sussex, within the historic county of Sussex, England, located between the High Weald and the Romney Marsh, approximately 2 mi south west of Rye and 7 mi north east of Hastings.wikipedia
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Rye, East Sussex

RyeRye, SussexRye Bay
Winchelsea is a small town in the non-metropolitan county of East Sussex, within the historic county of Sussex, England, located between the High Weald and the Romney Marsh, approximately 2 mi south west of Rye and 7 mi north east of Hastings. Camber Castle was built by Henry VIII in the early 16th century halfway between Winchelsea and Rye to guard the approach to the Camber.
As one of the two "Antient Townes" (Winchelsea being the other), Rye was to become a limb of the Cinque Ports Confederation by 1189, and subsequently a full member.

Romney Marsh

Romney MarshesLittle Cheyne CourtRomney
Winchelsea is a small town in the non-metropolitan county of East Sussex, within the historic county of Sussex, England, located between the High Weald and the Romney Marsh, approximately 2 mi south west of Rye and 7 mi north east of Hastings.
That lagoon lay behind a large island, which now makes up a large part of the Denge Marsh, on which stood the ports of Lydd and the old Winchelsea.

Hastings

Hastings, East SussexHastings Borough CouncilHastings, England
Winchelsea is a small town in the non-metropolitan county of East Sussex, within the historic county of Sussex, England, located between the High Weald and the Romney Marsh, approximately 2 mi south west of Rye and 7 mi north east of Hastings.
In the Middle Ages Hastings became one of the Cinque Ports; Sandwich, Dover and New Romney being the first, Hastings and Hythe followed, all finally being joined by Rye and Winchelsea, at one point 42 towns were directly or indirectly affiliated with the group.

Icklesham

The town is part of the civil parish of Icklesham.
The civil parish is large, and includes Icklesham itself, Winchelsea, Winchelsea Beach and Rye Harbour.

Cinque Ports

Cinque PortBarons of the Cinque Portsfive English ports
The corporation lost its remaining civil and judicial powers in 1886 but was preserved as a charity by an Act of Parliament to maintain the membership of the Cinque Port Confederation.
The five ports are supported by the two so-called Ancient Towns of Rye and Winchelsea, whose councils traditionally maintained defence contingents for the realm of England.

List of mayors of Winchelsea

Mayor of Winchelsea
The mayor of Winchelsea is chosen each year from amongst the members of the corporation, who are known as freemen, rather than being elected by public vote.
The following is a list of persons who have held the office of Mayor of Winchelsea:

Weald

High WealdThe WealdLow Weald
Winchelsea is a small town in the non-metropolitan county of East Sussex, within the historic county of Sussex, England, located between the High Weald and the Romney Marsh, approximately 2 mi south west of Rye and 7 mi north east of Hastings.
In 1216 during the First Barons' War, a guerilla force of archers from the Weald, led by William of Cassingham (nicknamed Willikin of the Weald), ambushed the French occupying army led by Prince Louis near Lewes and drove them to the coast at Winchelsea.

South England flood of February 1287

South England floodfloodgreat storm in 1287
Prior to 1280 incursions by the sea destroyed much of the town until a massive flood completely destroyed it in 1287.
The city of Winchelsea on Romney Marsh was destroyed (later rebuilt on the cliff top behind).

River Brede

BredeBrede Valley
Old Winchelsea was on a massive shingle bank that protected the confluence of the estuaries of the Rivers Brede, Rother and Tillingham and provided a sheltered anchorage called the Camber.
Two sections were new, with the middle part of it consisting of the River Rother from Iden Lock to Rye, and the Brede from Rye to Winchelsea.

River Rother, East Sussex

River RotherRotherRivers Rother
Old Winchelsea was on a massive shingle bank that protected the confluence of the estuaries of the Rivers Brede, Rother and Tillingham and provided a sheltered anchorage called the Camber.
The canal would join the River Rother at Iden and the river would become part of the defence system, as would the course of the River Brede from Rye to Winchelsea.

Camber Castle

Camber Castle was built by Henry VIII in the early 16th century halfway between Winchelsea and Rye to guard the approach to the Camber.
Camber Castle was built approximately 1.5 km between the ports of Rye and Winchelsea on the south coast of England, overlooking a body of water called the Camber, at the mouth of the Brede, Rother and Tillingham rivers.

St Leonard's Mill, Winchelsea

St Leonard's MillWinchelsea millwindmill
Another church, St Leonard's, was later the site of a windmill, which was blown down in the Great Storm of 1987.
St Leonard's mill was a post mill at Winchelsea, East Sussex, England which was blown down in the Great Storm of 1987.

Strand House, Winchelsea

Strand House
At the foot of Strand Hill stands the town workhouse Strand House just behind the port area of Winchelsea which runs along the river bank on the far side of the main road.
Strand House was the Parish Workhouse of the Sussex town of Winchelsea known as the "Old Poor Houses".

Henry le Walleis

Henry le GaleysHenry le Waleys
The names of the town planners are recorded as Henry le Waleys and Thomas Alard.
He also was appointed as one of the planners (along with Thomas Alard) of the city of Winchelsea.

Planned community

new townplanned citymaster-planned community
Today's Winchelsea was the result of the old town's population moving to the present site, when in 1281 King Edward I ordered a planned town, based on a grid, to be built.
The town of Winchelsea is said to be the first post-Roman new town in Britain, constructed to a grid system under the instructions of King Edward I in 1280, and largely completed by 1292.

Edward I of England

Edward IKing Edward IPrince Edward
Today's Winchelsea was the result of the old town's population moving to the present site, when in 1281 King Edward I ordered a planned town, based on a grid, to be built.
While Edward was in Winchelsea, preparing for the campaign in Flanders, Bigod and Bohun turned up at the Exchequer to prevent the collection of the tax.

Winchelsea railway station

Winchelsea
Winchelsea railway station is located 0.75 mi to the north in the Brede valley, on the Marshlink line between and.
It is about 1 km from Winchelsea and is actually in the neighbouring parish of Udimore.

A259 road

A259A259 coast roadcoast road
Winchelsea stands on the main south coast road, the A259.
The road passes through the town of Winchelsea, England's first new town.

Royal Military Canal

Hythe Military Canal
The Royal Military Canal built in the early 19th century as a defence-line against the highly anticipated invasion by Napoleon Bonaparte passes the eastern side of the town and connects to the river Brede.
It was constructed in two sections: the longer section starts at Hythe and ends at Iden Lock in East Sussex; the second, smaller section, runs from the foot of Winchelsea Hill to Cliff End.

Winchelsea (UK Parliament constituency)

WinchelseaWinchelsea (seat 1/2)List of former members of parliament
The constituency consisted of the town and parish of Winchelsea, once a market town and port but by the 19th century much reduced in importance, a mile-and-a-half inland with its harbour destroyed.

Ford Madox Ford

Ford Madox HuefferFord Maddox FordFord
In 1901, they moved to Winchelsea.

Battle of Winchelsea

Battle of Les Espagnols sur MerLes Espagnols sur MerWinchelsea
In 1350, the Battle of Les Espagnols sur Mer was fought nearby.
Much of this action was visible from the English shore, and the clifftops near Winchelsea were lined with spectators, which gave the battle its name.

Winchelsea Beach

The town lends its name to the nearby seaside village of Winchelsea Beach.
The village is located about ten miles (15 km) east of Hastings, and about 1.5 miles (2 km) south east of Winchelsea.

John Harris (writer)

John HarrisHarrisRev. John Harris
He was presented to the vicarage of Icklesham in Sussex, and subsequently to the rectory of St Thomas, Winchelsea.

Marshlink line

Ashford to Hastings lineMarshlinkMarshlink railway line
Winchelsea railway station is located 0.75 mi to the north in the Brede valley, on the Marshlink line between and.
The parallel A259 from Hastings to Brenzett had several level crossings over the line and a hairpin bend at Winchelsea, all of which remain as of the 21st century.