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Hampshire

HantsCounty of SouthamptonSouthampton
Winchester is a city and the county town of Hampshire, England.
The county town, with city status, is Winchester, a frequent seat of the Royal Court before any fixed capital, in late Anglo-Saxon England.

Winchester Cathedral

Winchestercathedralthe cathedral of Winchester
Winchester's major landmark is Winchester Cathedral, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the distinction of having the longest nave and overall length of all Gothic cathedrals in Europe.
Winchester Cathedral is a cathedral of the Church of England in Winchester, Hampshire, England.

Bishop's Waltham

Bishops WalthamWaltham
The wider City of Winchester district which includes towns such as Alresford and Bishop's Waltham has a population of 116,800.
It has a foot in the South Downs National Park and is located at the midpoint of a long-established route between Winchester and Portsmouth.

New Alresford

AlresfordAlresford, HampshireBrandy Mount
The wider City of Winchester district which includes towns such as Alresford and Bishop's Waltham has a population of 116,800.
It is 12 km northeast of Winchester and 20 km southwest of the town of Alton.

University of Winchester

King Alfred's CollegeKing Alfred's College, WinchesterKing Alfred College, Winchester
The city is home to the University of Winchester and Winchester College, the oldest public school in the United Kingdom still using its original buildings.
The University of Winchester is a public research university based in the city of Winchester, Hampshire, England.

County town

administrative centrecounty seatcounty towns
Winchester is a city and the county town of Hampshire, England.

Winchester College

WinchesterOld WykehamistsWinchester School
The city is home to the University of Winchester and Winchester College, the oldest public school in the United Kingdom still using its original buildings.
Winchester College is an independent boarding school for boys in the British public school tradition, situated in Winchester, Hampshire.

London

London, EnglandLondon, UKLondon, United Kingdom
It is situated 60 mi south-west of London and 13.6 mi from Southampton, its closest city.
Winchester had previously been the capital of Anglo-Saxon England, but from this time on, London became the main forum for foreign traders and the base for defence in time of war.

St. Catherine's Hill, Hampshire

St. Catherine's HillSt Catherine's HillSt Catherine’s Hill
The area around Winchester has been inhabited since prehistoric times, with three Iron Age hillforts, Oram's Arbour, St. Catherine's Hill, and Worthy Down all in the nearby vicinity.
St. Catherine's Hill is a small but dramatic chalk hill to the south east of Winchester in Hampshire, England.

Venta Belgarum

VentaCaerwentaVenta Belgarum (Winchester)
Winchester developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which in turn developed from an Iron Age oppidum.
Venta Belgarum was a town in the Roman province of Britannia Superior, the civitas capital of the local tribe, the Belgae, and which later became the city of Winchester.

Bishop of Winchester

WinchesterBishops of WinchesterBishop of Dorchester
Also in the late tenth century, the Old Minster was enlarged as a centre of the cult of the ninth century Bishop of Winchester, Saint Swithun.
It was transferred to Winchester in AD 660.

St Mary's Abbey, Winchester

St Mary's AbbeyNunnaminsterNunnaminster, Winchester
In the early tenth century there were two new ecclesiastical establishments, the convent of Nunnaminster, founded by Alfred's widow Ealhswith, and the New Minster.
St. Mary's Abbey, also known as the Nunnaminster, was a Benedictine nunnery in Winchester, Hampshire.

Otterbourne

Otterbourne, Hampshire
In 1770, Thomas Dummer purchased the Buttercross from the Corporation of Winchester, intending to have it re-erected at Cranbury Park, near Otterbourne.
It is located approximately 4 mi south of Winchester and 8 mi north of Southampton.

New Minster, Winchester

New MinsterNewNew Minster in Winchester
In the early tenth century there were two new ecclesiastical establishments, the convent of Nunnaminster, founded by Alfred's widow Ealhswith, and the New Minster.
The New Minster in Winchester was a royal Benedictine abbey founded in 901 in Winchester in the English county of Hampshire.

Cranbury Park

CranburyCranbury House
In 1770, Thomas Dummer purchased the Buttercross from the Corporation of Winchester, intending to have it re-erected at Cranbury Park, near Otterbourne.
Cranbury Park is a stately home and country estate situated in the parish of Hursley, near to Otterbourne, Winchester, England.

William of Wykeham

William WykehamWykehamBishop of Winchester
William of Wykeham played a role in the city's restoration.
He was educated at a school in Winchester, and probably enjoyed early patronage from two local men, Sir Ralph Sutton, constable of Winchester Castle, and Sir John Scures, lord of the manor of Wickham, and then from Thomas Foxley, Constable of Windsor Castle.

Rout of Winchester

Battle of Winchesterrout of her forcesWinchester
There was a fire in the city in 1141 during the Rout of Winchester.
After Empress Matilda's army besieged a castle on the edge of Winchester, Queen Matilda's army arrived and blockaded the Angevin army within the city.

Wessex

West SaxonWest Saxonskingdom of Wessex
In 648, King Cenwalh of Wessex erected the Church of SS Peter and Paul, later known as the Old Minster.
During the Roman occupation starting in the 1st century AD, numerous country villas with attached farms were established across Wessex, along with the important towns of Dorchester and Winchester (the ending -chester comes from Latin castra, "a military camp").

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
The city became known as Wintan-ceastre ("Fort Venta") in Old English.
This form of the language is known as the "Winchester standard", or more commonly as Late West Saxon.

Alfred the Great

King AlfredAlfredKing Alfred the Great
The present form of the city dates to reconstruction in the late 9th century, when king Alfred the Great obliterated the Roman street plan in favour of a new grid in order to provide better defence against the Vikings.
Statues of Alfred in Winchester and Wantage portray him as a great warrior.

To Autumn

While staying in Winchester from mid-August to October 1819, the Romantic poet John Keats wrote "Isabella", "St. Agnes' Eve", "To Autumn", "Lamia" and parts of "Hyperion" and the five-act poetic tragedy "Otho The Great".
Although personal problems left him little time to devote to poetry in 1819, he composed "To Autumn" after a walk near Winchester one autumnal evening.

Winnall, Hampshire

Winnall
Winnall
Winnall is a northern suburb of Winchester, Hampshire, on the east bank of the River Itchen.

Oram's Arbour

The area around Winchester has been inhabited since prehistoric times, with three Iron Age hillforts, Oram's Arbour, St. Catherine's Hill, and Worthy Down all in the nearby vicinity.
Oram's Arbour was an enclosed settlement during the Iron Age, in what is now Winchester.

Stanmore, Winchester

Stanmore
Stanmore
Stanmore is a large residential suburb of Winchester, Hampshire, England, situated on a very steep slope from West to East.

River Itchen, Hampshire

River ItchenItchenItchen Valley
The city lies at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, and is located at the western end of the South Downs National Park, along the course of the River Itchen.
Before entering the historic city of Winchester it crosses Winnall Moors.