Wind wave

waveswavewave dominatedocean wavewater wavessurfocean surface wavewater wavewave actionocean waves
In fluid dynamics, wind waves, or wind-generated waves, are surface waves that occur on the free surface of bodies of water (like oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, canals, puddles or ponds).wikipedia
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Sea

maritimemarineopen sea
In fluid dynamics, wind waves, or wind-generated waves, are surface waves that occur on the free surface of bodies of water (like oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, canals, puddles or ponds).
Winds blowing over the surface of the sea produce waves, which break when they enter shallow water.

Surface wave

ground wavegroundwavesurface waves
In fluid dynamics, wind waves, or wind-generated waves, are surface waves that occur on the free surface of bodies of water (like oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, canals, puddles or ponds).
Examples are the waves at the surface of water and air (ocean surface waves).

Sea state

sea state 6rough seasrough
The key statistics of wind waves (both seas and swells) in evolving sea states can be predicted with wind wave models. Individual "rogue waves" (also called "freak waves", "monster waves", "killer waves", and "king waves") much higher than the other waves in the sea state can occur.
In oceanography, a sea state is the general condition of the free surface on a large body of water—with respect to wind waves and swell—at a certain location and moment.

Swell (ocean)

swellsswellocean swell
After the wind ceases to blow, wind waves are called swells.
These series of surface gravity waves are not wind waves, which are generated by the immediate local wind, but instead are generated by distant weather systems, where wind blows for a duration of time over a fetch of water.

Wave height

trough to crestwave heightsheight
Wave height (vertical distance from trough to crest)
In fluid dynamics, the wave height of a surface wave is the difference between the elevations of a crest and a neighbouring trough.

Significant wave height

wave height
For weather reporting and for scientific analysis of wind wave statistics, their characteristic height over a period of time is usually expressed as significant wave height.
is defined traditionally as the mean wave height (trough to crest) of the highest third of the waves (H 1/3 ).

Free surface

free surface flowsurfacefluid surface
In fluid dynamics, wind waves, or wind-generated waves, are surface waves that occur on the free surface of bodies of water (like oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, canals, puddles or ponds).
Very minute waves or ripples are not due to gravity but to capillary action, and have properties different from those of the longer ocean surface waves,

Tsunami

tsunamistidal waveseaquake
Such waves are distinct from tides, caused by the Moon and Sun's gravitational pull, tsunamis that are caused by underwater earthquakes or landslides, and waves generated by underwater explosions or the fall of meteorites—all having far longer wavelengths than wind waves.
Unlike normal ocean waves, which are generated by wind, or tides, which are generated by the gravitational pull of the Moon and the Sun, a tsunami is generated by the displacement of water.

Wind wave model

WAMocean wave modelsforecasts
The key statistics of wind waves (both seas and swells) in evolving sea states can be predicted with wind wave models.
This approach allowed to make combined forecasts of wind seas and swells.

Fluid dynamics

hydrodynamicshydrodynamicfluid flow
In fluid dynamics, wind waves, or wind-generated waves, are surface waves that occur on the free surface of bodies of water (like oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, canals, puddles or ponds).
Ocean surface waves

Frequency

frequenciesperiodperiodic
Wave period (time interval between arrival of consecutive crests at a stationary point)
As a matter of convenience, longer and slower waves, such as ocean surface waves, tend to be described by wave period rather than frequency.

Wave shoaling

shoalingshoaling wavespitch up and break
This process is called shoaling.
In fluid dynamics, wave shoaling is the effect by which surface waves entering shallower water change in wave height.

Wavelength

wavelengthsperiodsubwavelength
Such waves are distinct from tides, caused by the Moon and Sun's gravitational pull, tsunamis that are caused by underwater earthquakes or landslides, and waves generated by underwater explosions or the fall of meteorites—all having far longer wavelengths than wind waves. Wave length (distance from crest to crest in the direction of propagation)
Examples of wave-like phenomena are sound waves, light, water waves and periodic electrical signals in a conductor.

Seiche

seichesseiche wavehigh waves
Seiches in harbours can be caused by long period or infragravity waves, which are due to subharmonic nonlinear wave interaction with the wind waves, having periods longer than the accompanying wind-generated waves.

Refraction

refractedrefractiverefract
Wave refraction is the process that occurs when waves interact with the sea bed as the wave crests align themselves as a result of approaching decreasing water depths at an angle to the depth contours.
Refraction of light is the most commonly observed phenomenon, but other waves such as sound waves and water waves also experience refraction.

Wave propagation

propagationpropagatespropagating
Wave propagation direction
The dispersion relationship depends on the medium through which the waves propagate and on the type of waves (for instance electromagnetic, sound or water waves).

Surfing

surfersurferssurf
Three main types of breaking waves are identified by surfers or surf lifesavers.
Surfing is a surface water sport in which the wave rider, referred to as a surfer, rides on the forward or deep face of a moving wave, which usually carries the surfer towards the shore.

Waves and shallow water

shallow watershallow watersshallow-water
Varying depths along a wave crest cause the crest to travel at different phase speeds, with those parts of the wave in deeper water moving faster than those in shallow water.
When waves travel into areas of shallow water, they begin to be affected by the ocean bottom.

Rogue wave

freak waverogue wavesfreak waves
Individual "rogue waves" (also called "freak waves", "monster waves", "killer waves", and "king waves") much higher than the other waves in the sea state can occur.
;Wind wave interactions :While it is unlikely that wind alone can generate a rogue wave, its effect combined with other mechanisms may provide a fuller explanation of freak wave phenomena.

Breaking wave

surfbreakerswave breaking
A breaking wave is one whose base can no longer support its top, causing it to collapse.
The most generally familiar sort of breaking wave is the breaking of water surface waves on a coastline.

Gravity wave

gravity wavessurface gravity waveg-mode
Wind waves are mechanical waves that propagate along the interface between water and air; the restoring force is provided by gravity, and so they are often referred to as surface gravity waves.
An example of such an interface is that between the atmosphere and the ocean, which gives rise to wind waves.

Transverse wave

transversetransverse wavestransversal
Wind waves are thus a combination of transversal and longitudinal waves.
(Although strictly speaking water waves have a small longitudinal component as well.)]]

Boussinesq approximation (water waves)

Boussinesq approximationBoussinesq equationBoussinesq equations
For intermediate and shallow water, the Boussinesq equations are applicable, combining frequency dispersion and nonlinear effects.
In fluid dynamics, the Boussinesq approximation for water waves is an approximation valid for weakly non-linear and fairly long waves.

Wave

wavestravelling wavetraveling wave
Wind waves are mechanical waves that propagate along the interface between water and air; the restoring force is provided by gravity, and so they are often referred to as surface gravity waves.
There are water waves on the ocean surface; gamma waves and light waves emitted by the Sun; microwaves used in microwave ovens and in radar equipment; radio waves broadcast by radio stations; and sound waves generated by radio receivers, telephone handsets and living creatures (as voices), to mention only a few wave phenomena.

RRS Discovery (1962)

RRS ''DiscoveryRRS ''Discovery'' (1962)RRS Discovery
For example: 29.1 m high waves have been recorded on the RRS Discovery in a sea with 18.5 m significant wave height, so the highest wave is only 1.6 times the significant wave height.
In February 2000, Discovery observed some of the largest waves, up to 29.1 metres, recorded by scientific instruments up to that time.