Windows NT 3.1

3.1NT 3.1OS/2 subsystemversion 3.1Windows NT 3.1 Advanced Server editionWindows NT 3.xWindows NT Advanced Server
Windows NT 3.1 is an operating system that was produced by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems.wikipedia
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Windows NT

NTMicrosoft Windows NTWinNT
Windows NT 3.1 is an operating system that was produced by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems.
The first version of Windows NT was Windows NT 3.1 and was produced for workstations and server computers.

Windows 3.1x

Windows 3.1Windows 3.x3.1
At the time of Windows NT's release, Microsoft's Windows 3.1 desktop environment had established brand recognition and market share; but Windows 3.1 relied on the DOS operating system for essential functions, and it had a constrictive 16-bit architecture. In March 1992, Microsoft also released Win32s, which would allow Windows 3.1 to have partial compatibility with Windows NT programs for the purposes of developing software optimized for the platform.
There was a rumor that Microsoft did not want to increase any mainstream Windows 3.1x version to something like "Windows 3.2" because it could be confused with the Win32 API or otherwise distract consumers from upgrading to a "real 32-bit OS", though Windows NT 3.1 and 3.5 were both 32-bit operating systems that looked similar in appearance.

Win32s

In March 1992, Microsoft also released Win32s, which would allow Windows 3.1 to have partial compatibility with Windows NT programs for the purposes of developing software optimized for the platform.
Version 1.10 was released in July 1993 simultaneously with Windows NT 3.1.

Microsoft Windows

WindowsPCWin
In May 1990, Microsoft released Windows 3.0, a new version of its MS-DOS-based Windows desktop environment.
Windows NT: Started as a family of operating systems with Windows NT 3.1, an operating system for server computers and workstations. It now consists of three operating system subfamilies that are released almost at the same time and share the same kernel:

Computer multitasking

multitaskingmulti-taskingmultitask
While Microsoft had a major foothold on the personal computer market due to the use of its MS-DOS as the de facto operating system of IBM PC compatibles, Nathan Myhrvold (who had joined Microsoft after its acquisition of Dynamical Systems Research) identified two major threats to Microsoft's monopoly—the RISC architecture, which proved to be more powerful than the equivalent Intel processors that MS-DOS ran on, and Unix, a family of cross-platform multitasking operating systems with support for multiprocessing and networking.
Microsoft made preemptive multitasking a core feature of their flagship operating system in the early 1990s when developing Windows NT 3.1 and then Windows 95.

NTFS

alternate data streamMFTAlternate Data Streams
Windows NT 3.1 introduced the new NTFS file system.
Starting with Windows NT 3.1, it is the default file system of the Windows NT family.

Windows API

Win32Win32 APIWindows
In August 1990, as a response to the popularity of Windows 3.0, the NT OS/2 team decided to re-work the operating system to use an extended 32-bit port of the Windows API known as Win32.
While Win32 was originally introduced with Windows NT 3.1 and Win32s allowed use of a Win32 subset before Windows 95, it was not until Windows 95 that widespread porting of applications to Win32 began.

Performance Monitor

However, it also included applications specifically aimed at the needs of Windows NT, like the User Manager, the Performance Monitor, the Disk Administrator, the Event Viewer and the Backup application.
Performance Monitor (known as System Monitor in Windows 9x, Windows 2000 and Windows XP) is a system monitoring program introduced in Windows NT 3.1.

LAN Manager

LMLAN Manager authenticationLanMan
The Advanced Server, intended to be the successor to the unsuccessful LAN Manager product, was technically much superior to its predecessor, and only failed to gain success because it shared the same problems with its workstation pendant, such as the low performance running 16-bit applications.
The last version LAN Manager, 2.2, which included an MS-OS/2 1.31 base operating system, remained Microsoft's strategic server system until the release of Windows NT Advanced Server in 1993.

Windows NT 3.5

3.5NT 3.5Windows NT 3.5 Server edition
They respectively replace the NT and NT Advanced Server editions of Windows NT 3.1.

High Performance File System

HPFS
For compatibility reasons, Windows NT 3.1 also supports FAT16 as well as OS/2's file system HPFS.
Windows NT 3.1 and 3.5 have native read/write support for local disks and can even be installed onto an HPFS partition.

Microsoft Write

Write.WRIWindows Write
For compatibility reasons, Windows NT 3.1 shipped with a few 16-bit applications, like Microsoft Write or EDLIN.

Operating system

operating systemsOScomputer operating system
Windows NT 3.1 is an operating system that was produced by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems.

Microsoft

Microsoft CorporationMSMicrosoft Corp.
Windows NT 3.1 is an operating system that was produced by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems.

Desktop environment

desktopdesktop environmentsdesktops
At the time of Windows NT's release, Microsoft's Windows 3.1 desktop environment had established brand recognition and market share; but Windows 3.1 relied on the DOS operating system for essential functions, and it had a constrictive 16-bit architecture. In May 1990, Microsoft released Windows 3.0, a new version of its MS-DOS-based Windows desktop environment.

Brand awareness

brand recognitionhousehold nameAwareness
At the time of Windows NT's release, Microsoft's Windows 3.1 desktop environment had established brand recognition and market share; but Windows 3.1 relied on the DOS operating system for essential functions, and it had a constrictive 16-bit architecture.

Market share

sharemarket-sharemarket
At the time of Windows NT's release, Microsoft's Windows 3.1 desktop environment had established brand recognition and market share; but Windows 3.1 relied on the DOS operating system for essential functions, and it had a constrictive 16-bit architecture.

DOS

PCprnCOM1
At the time of Windows NT's release, Microsoft's Windows 3.1 desktop environment had established brand recognition and market share; but Windows 3.1 relied on the DOS operating system for essential functions, and it had a constrictive 16-bit architecture.

Brand extension

spin-offextendspun off
By extending the Windows brand and beginning Windows NT at version 3.1, Microsoft implied that consumers should expect a familiar user experience.

Software versioning

versionversion numbermajor release
By extending the Windows brand and beginning Windows NT at version 3.1, Microsoft implied that consumers should expect a familiar user experience.

User experience

UXUser Experience (UX)experience
By extending the Windows brand and beginning Windows NT at version 3.1, Microsoft implied that consumers should expect a familiar user experience.

OS/2

1.11.2a proprietary operating system
Windows NT began as a rewrite of the OS/2 operating system, which Microsoft had co-developed with IBM in the 1980s.

IBM

International Business MachinesIBM CorporationInternational Business Machines Corporation
Windows NT began as a rewrite of the OS/2 operating system, which Microsoft had co-developed with IBM in the 1980s.

Windows 3.0

3.0Windows 3.xMME
In May 1990, Microsoft released Windows 3.0, a new version of its MS-DOS-based Windows desktop environment. For several reasons, including the market success of Windows 3.0 in 1990, Microsoft decided to advance Windows rather than OS/2.

Fork (software development)

forkforkedforks
They relinquished their OS/2 development responsibilities to IBM, and forked their work on OS/2 v3.0 into a competing operating system.