Winston Churchill

ChurchillSir Winston ChurchillChurchill, WinstonWinstonChurchillianPrime MinisterPrime Minister ChurchillWinston S. ChurchillPrime Minister Winston ChurchillRt Hon. Winston Churchill
Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill (30 November 187424 January 1965) was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955.wikipedia
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Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, for most of his parliamentary career he was a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 was instead a member of the Liberal Party. His paternal grandfather, John Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough, had been a Member of Parliament (MP) for ten years, a member of the Conservative Party who served in the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli.
Conservative Prime Ministers led governments for 57 years of the twentieth century, including Winston Churchill (1940–1945, 1951–1955) and Margaret Thatcher (1979–1990).

1945 United Kingdom general election

1945 general election19451945 election
After the Conservatives' defeat in the 1945 general election, he became Leader of the Opposition.
The result was an unexpected landslide victory for Clement Attlee's Labour Party, over Winston Churchill's Conservatives.

1964 United Kingdom general election

19641964 general election1964 election
In declining health, Churchill resigned as prime minister in 1955, although he remained an MP until 1964.
The 1964 United Kingdom general election was held on 15 October 1964, five years after the previous election, and thirteen years after the Conservative Party, first led by Winston Churchill, had entered power.

Stanley Baldwin

BaldwinStanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of BewdleyPrime Minister
After two years out of Parliament, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Stanley Baldwin's Conservative government, returning the pound sterling in 1925 to the gold standard at its pre-war parity, a move widely seen as creating deflationary pressure on the UK economy.
After winning the 1924 general election Baldwin formed his second government, which saw important tenures of office by Sir Austen Chamberlain (Foreign Secretary), Winston Churchill (at the Exchequer) and Neville Chamberlain (Health).

Appeasement

appeasement of Hitlerappeaseappeasement policy
Out of office during the 1930s, Churchill took the lead in calling for British rearmament to counter the growing threat from Nazi Germany.
However, by the time of the Munich Pact—concluded on 30 September 1938 among Germany, Britain, France, and Italy—the policy was opposed by most of the British left and Labour Party, by Conservative dissenters such as Winston Churchill and Duff Cooper, and even by Anthony Eden, a former proponent of appeasement.

State funerals in the United Kingdom

state funeralstate funeralsceremonial funeral
Upon his death in 1965, he was given a state funeral.
This last happened in 1965 for Sir Winston Churchill.

Lord Randolph Churchill

Randolph ChurchillLord Randolph Henry Spencer-ChurchillLord
His own father, Lord Randolph Churchill, had been elected Conservative MP for Woodstock in 1873.
His elder son, Winston, wrote a biography of him in 1906.

John Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough

The Duke of Marlborough7th Duke of MarlboroughDuke of Marlborough
His paternal grandfather, John Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough, had been a Member of Parliament (MP) for ten years, a member of the Conservative Party who served in the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli.
He was the paternal grandfather of Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill.

Second Baldwin ministry

Baldwin IIConservative Government1924–1929 Conservative Government
After two years out of Parliament, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Stanley Baldwin's Conservative government, returning the pound sterling in 1925 to the gold standard at its pre-war parity, a move widely seen as creating deflationary pressure on the UK economy.
Winston Churchill – Chancellor of the Exchequer

Neville Chamberlain

ChamberlainMr. ChamberlainNeville
Following Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's resignation in 1940, Churchill replaced him.
He was succeeded by Winston Churchill but remained very well regarded in Parliament, especially among Conservatives.

1953 Iranian coup d'état

coup d'état1953 coupcoup
Re-elected Prime Minister in 1951 election|1951, his second term was preoccupied with foreign affairs, including the Malayan Emergency, Mau Mau Uprising, Korean War, and a UK-backed Iranian coup.
Judging Mosaddegh to be unreliable and fearing a Communist takeover in Iran, UK prime minister Winston Churchill and the Eisenhower administration decided to overthrow Iran's government, though the predecessor Truman administration had opposed a coup, fearing the precedent that Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) involvement would set.

Elizabeth Everest

Mrs. Elizabeth Everest
In Dublin, he was educated in reading and mathematics by a governess, while he and his brother were cared for primarily by their nanny, Elizabeth Everest.
Elizabeth Ann Everest (c. 1832 – 3 July 1895) was Winston Churchill's beloved nanny, and an important figure in his early life.

Blenheim Palace

BlenheimBlenheim EstateBlenheim Great Park
Churchill was born at the family's ancestral home, Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire, on 30 November 1874, at which time the United Kingdom was the dominant world power.
The palace is notable as the birthplace and ancestral home of Sir Winston Churchill.

Allies of World War II

AlliedAlliesAllied forces
Churchill oversaw British involvement in the Allied war effort, resulting in victory in 1945.
During December 1941, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt devised the name "United Nations" for the Allies and proposed it to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

St George's School, Ascot

St George's SchoolSt. George's SchoolSt George's, Ascot
Aged seven, he began boarding at St. George's School in Ascot, Berkshire; he hated it, did poorly academically, and regularly misbehaved.
Among its former pupils was the famous British war-time Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

Mau Mau Uprising

Mau MauMau Mau rebellionKenya
Re-elected Prime Minister in 1951 election|1951, his second term was preoccupied with foreign affairs, including the Malayan Emergency, Mau Mau Uprising, Korean War, and a UK-backed Iranian coup.
The nature of fighting in Kenya led Winston Churchill to express concern in 1908 about how it would look if word got out:

The River War

The River War: An Account of the Reconquest of the SoudanThe River War: An Account of the Reconquest of the SudanThe River War: An Historical Account of the Reconquest of the Soudan
Back in England by October, Churchill wrote an account of the campaign, published as The River War in November 1899.
The River War: An Historical Account of the Reconquest of the Soudan (1899), by Winston Churchill, concerning his experiences as a British Army officer, during the Mahdist War (1881–99) in the Sudan.

Chancellor of the Exchequer

ChancellorChancellors of the ExchequerSpokesperson for the Treasury
After two years out of Parliament, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Stanley Baldwin's Conservative government, returning the pound sterling in 1925 to the gold standard at its pre-war parity, a move widely seen as creating deflationary pressure on the UK economy.
According to George Osborne, the robe (dating from Gladstone's time in office, and worn by the likes of Lloyd George and Churchill) 'went missing' during Gordon Brown's time as chancellor.

Jack Churchill (1880–1947)

JackJohnJack Churchill
It was here that Jennie's second son, Jack, was born in 1880; there has been speculation that Randolph was not his biological father.
Major John Strange Spencer-Churchill, DSO, TD (16 September 1880 – 23 February 1947), known as Jack Churchill, was the younger son of Lord Randolph Churchill and his wife Jennie, and the brother of former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Sir Winston Churchill.

Harrow School

HarrowOld HarrovianOld Harrovians
He narrowly passed the entrance exam which allowed him to begin studies at the elite Harrow School in April 1888.
Its alumni include eight former British or Indian Prime Ministers (including Peel, Palmerston, Baldwin, Churchill and Nehru), foreign politicians, former and current members of both houses of the U.K. Parliament, five kings and several other members of various royal families, three Nobel Prize winners, twenty Victoria Cross and one George Cross holders, and many figures in the arts and sciences.

Charles Spencer-Churchill, 9th Duke of Marlborough

9th Duke of MarlboroughDuke of MarlboroughThe Duke of Marlborough
He and his cousin, the Duke of Marlborough, were able to get ahead of the rest of the troops in Pretoria, where they demanded and received the surrender of 52 Boer prison camp guards.
Charles Richard John Spencer-Churchill, 9th Duke of Marlborough, (13 November 1871 – 30 June 1934), styled Earl of Sunderland until 1883 and Marquess of Blandford between 1883 and 1892, was a British soldier and Conservative politician, and a close friend of his first cousin Winston Churchill.

Liberal welfare reforms

welfare reformsliberal reformsreforms
In H. H. Asquith's Liberal government, Churchill served as President of the Board of Trade, Home Secretary, and First Lord of the Admiralty, championing prison reform and workers' social security.
Germany and the United States were overtaking Britain as economic powers – the success of social legislation in Bismarck's Germany made leading Liberals in the UK such as David Lloyd George and Winston Churchill want to put forward similar legislation.

London to Ladysmith via Pretoria

In May, while he had still been in South Africa, his Morning Post despatches had been published as London to Ladysmith via Pretoria, which sold well.
London to Ladysmith via Pretoria is a book written by Winston Churchill.

Duke of Marlborough (title)

Duke of MarlboroughDukes of MarlboroughDukedom of Marlborough
Of mixed English and American parentage, Churchill was born in Oxfordshire to a wealthy, aristocratic family.
The 7th Duke was the paternal grandfather of the British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, born at Blenheim Palace on 30 November 1874.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in Europe in the Second World War.
British discontent over the Norwegian campaign led to the appointment of Winston Churchill as Prime Minister on 10May 1940.