Wireless

wireless communicationwireless communicationswireless internetwireless technologywireless devicewireless telecommunicationsover-the-airwireless technologieswireless telephonywireless devices
Wireless communication is the transfer of information or power between two or more points that are not connected by an electrical conductor.wikipedia
1,522 Related Articles

Bluetooth

Bluetooth 4.0Bluetooth 5.0Bluetooth 2.0
With radio waves distances can be short, such as a few meters for Bluetooth or as far as millions of kilometers for deep-space radio communications. RF CMOS is used in the radio transceivers of all modern wireless networking devices and mobile phones, and is widely used to transmit and receive wireless signals in a variety of applications, such as satellite technology (e.g. GPS), bluetooth, Wi-Fi, near-field communication (NFC), mobile networks (e.g. 3G and 4G), terrestrial broadcast, and automotive radar applications, among other uses. This became its primary usage in the 2000s, due to the advent of technologies such as mobile broadband, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Radio-frequency interfaces, such as Bluetooth or Wireless USB, provide greater ranges of efficient use, usually up to 10 feet, but distance, physical obstacles, competing signals, and even human bodies can all degrade the signal quality.
Bluetooth is a wireless technology standard used for exchanging data between fixed and mobile devices over short distances using short-wavelength UHF radio waves in the industrial, scientific and medical radio bands, from 2.400 to 2.485GHz, and building personal area networks (PANs).

Wireless power transfer

Wireless energy transferwireless power transmissionwireless power
Wireless communication is the transfer of information or power between two or more points that are not connected by an electrical conductor.
Wireless power uses the same fields and waves as wireless communication devices like radio, another familiar technology that involves electrical energy transmitted without wires by electromagnetic fields, used in cellphones, radio and television broadcasting, and WiFi.

Headphones

headphoneearphoneearphones
Other examples of applications of radio wireless technology include GPS units, garage door openers, wireless computer mouse, keyboards and headsets, headphones, radio receivers, satellite television, broadcast television and cordless telephones.
Headphones connect to a signal source such as an audio amplifier, radio, CD player, portable media player, mobile phone, video game console, or electronic musical instrument, either directly using a cord, or using wireless technology such as Bluetooth, DECT or FM radio.

Telecommunication

telecommunicationscommunicationstelecom
Wireless communication is the transfer of information or power between two or more points that are not connected by an electrical conductor.
A revolution in wireless communication began in the first decade of the 20th century with the pioneering developments in radio communications by Guglielmo Marconi, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1909, and other notable pioneering inventors and developers in the field of electrical and electronic telecommunications.

Garage door opener

Overhead DoorGarage door controllersGarage Door Openers
Other examples of applications of radio wireless technology include GPS units, garage door openers, wireless computer mouse, keyboards and headsets, headphones, radio receivers, satellite television, broadcast television and cordless telephones.
The second stage of the wireless garage door opener system solved the opening-the-neighbor's-garage-door problem.

Cellular network

cellularmobile networkcellular networks
The wireless revolution began in the 1990s, with the advent of digital wireless networks leading to a social revolution, and a paradigm shift from wired to wireless technology, including the proliferation of commercial wireless technologies such as cell phones, mobile telephony, pagers, wireless computer networks, cellular networks, the wireless Internet, and laptop and handheld computers with wireless connections. The MOSFET is the basic building block of modern wireless networks, including mobile networks such as 2G, 3G and 4G.
A cellular network or mobile network is a communication network where the last link is wireless.

3G

IMT-20003G networkIMT
The MOSFET is the basic building block of modern wireless networks, including mobile networks such as 2G, 3G and 4G.
3G is the third generation of wireless mobile telecommunications technology.

Jagadish Chandra Bose

Jagdish Chandra BoseSir Jagadish Chandra BoseJ. C. Bose
Millimetre wave communication was first investigated by Jagadish Chandra Bose during 1894–1896, when he reached an extremely high frequency of up to 60GHz in his experiments.
He made remarkable progress in his research of remote wireless signalling and was the first to use semiconductor junctions to detect radio signals.

Edholm's law

MOSFET scaling is also the primary factor behind rapidly increasing wireless network bandwidth, which has been doubling every 18 months, as noted by Edholm's law.
Edholm's law, proposed by and named after Phil Edholm, refers to the observation that the three categories of telecommunication, namely wireless (mobile), nomadic (wireless without mobility) and wired networks (fixed), are in lockstep and gradually converging.

Mobile telephony

mobile communicationmobile telecommunicationsmobile communications
The wireless revolution began in the 1990s, with the advent of digital wireless networks leading to a social revolution, and a paradigm shift from wired to wireless technology, including the proliferation of commercial wireless technologies such as cell phones, mobile telephony, pagers, wireless computer networks, cellular networks, the wireless Internet, and laptop and handheld computers with wireless connections.
There was a rapid growth of wireless telecommunications towards the end of the 20th century, primarily due to the introduction of digital signal processing in wireless communications, driven by the development of low-cost, very large-scale integration (VLSI) RF CMOS (radio-frequency complementary MOS) technology.

Base station

base stationsWireless base stationradio base station
Most of the essential elements in modern wireless networks are built from MOSFETs, including the base station modules, routers, RF circuits, radio transceivers, transmitters, and RF power amplifiers.
The term is used in the context of mobile telephony, wireless computer networking and other wireless communications and in land surveying.

Router (computing)

routerroutersnetwork router
Most of the essential elements in modern wireless networks are built from MOSFETs, including the base station modules, routers, RF circuits, radio transceivers, transmitters, and RF power amplifiers.
A router may have interfaces for different types of physical layer connections, such as copper cables, fiber optic, or wireless transmission.

Headset (audio)

headsetheadsetsBluetooth headset
Other examples of applications of radio wireless technology include GPS units, garage door openers, wireless computer mouse, keyboards and headsets, headphones, radio receivers, satellite television, broadcast television and cordless telephones.
Wireless headsets are quickly becoming a new trend for both business and consumer communications.

Broadcasting

broadcastbroadcasterbroadcasters
RF CMOS is used in the radio transceivers of all modern wireless networking devices and mobile phones, and is widely used to transmit and receive wireless signals in a variety of applications, such as satellite technology (e.g. GPS), bluetooth, Wi-Fi, near-field communication (NFC), mobile networks (e.g. 3G and 4G), terrestrial broadcast, and automotive radar applications, among other uses.
Over the air broadcasting is usually associated with radio and television, though in recent years, both radio and television transmissions have begun to be distributed by cable (cable television).

Remote control

remote-controlledremoteinfrared remote control
Another widely used example is consumer IR devices such as remote controls and IrDA (Infrared Data Association) networking, which is used as an alternative to WiFi networking to allow laptops, PDAs, printers, and digital cameras to exchange data.
In electronics, a remote control or clicker is an electronic device used to operate another device from a distance, usually wirelessly.

Mobile broadband

mobile datadatamobile
This became its primary usage in the 2000s, due to the advent of technologies such as mobile broadband, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.
Edholm's law in 2004 noted that the bandwidths of wireless cellular networks have been increasing at a faster pace compared to wired telecommunications networks.

Consumer IR

InfraredCIRConsumer infrared
Another widely used example is consumer IR devices such as remote controls and IrDA (Infrared Data Association) networking, which is used as an alternative to WiFi networking to allow laptops, PDAs, printers, and digital cameras to exchange data.
Consumer IR, consumer infrared, or CIR, is a class of devices employing the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum for wireless communications.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
The Edison system was used by stranded trains during the Great Blizzard of 1888 and earth conductive systems found limited use between trenches during World War I but these systems were never successful economically.
By the end of 1917, however, the major armies, now numbering millions of men, had modernised and were making use of telephone, wireless communication, armoured cars, tanks, and aircraft.

MOSFET

metal-oxide-semiconductorMOSMOS integrated circuit
MOSFET scaling is also the primary factor behind rapidly increasing wireless network bandwidth, which has been doubling every 18 months, as noted by Edholm's law. The core component of this revolution is the MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor, or MOS transistor).
MOS technology, including MOS integrated circuit chips and discrete power MOSFETs, are fundamental to modern computers and communications infrastructure, such as the Internet, digital telephony, wireless telecommunications, and mobile networks.

Wireless USB

Certified Wireless USBWireless Host Controller InterfaceWUSB
Radio-frequency interfaces, such as Bluetooth or Wireless USB, provide greater ranges of efficient use, usually up to 10 feet, but distance, physical obstacles, competing signals, and even human bodies can all degrade the signal quality.
Wireless USB is a short-range, high-bandwidth wireless radio communication protocol created by the Wireless USB Promoter Group which intends to further increase the availability of general USB-based technologies.

Microwave

microwavesmicrowave radiationmicrowave tube
microwave communication carry information by modulating properties of electromagnetic waves transmitted through space.
The short wavelengths of microwaves allow omnidirectional antennas for portable devices to be made very small, from 1 to 20 centimeters long, so microwave frequencies are widely used for wireless devices such as cell phones, cordless phones, and wireless LANs (Wi-Fi) access for laptops, and Bluetooth earphones.

Amateur radio

ham radioamateur radio licenseamateur
In the absence of such control or alternative arrangements such as a privatized electromagnetic spectrum, chaos might result if, for example, airlines did not have specific frequencies to work under and an amateur radio operator was interfering with a pilot's ability to land an aircraft.
Amateur radio, also known as ham radio, is the use of radio frequency spectrum for purposes of non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, private recreation, radiosport, contesting, and emergency communication.

Wi-Fi

WiFiwireless internetwireless
RF CMOS is used in the radio transceivers of all modern wireless networking devices and mobile phones, and is widely used to transmit and receive wireless signals in a variety of applications, such as satellite technology (e.g. GPS), bluetooth, Wi-Fi, near-field communication (NFC), mobile networks (e.g. 3G and 4G), terrestrial broadcast, and automotive radar applications, among other uses. Another widely used example is consumer IR devices such as remote controls and IrDA (Infrared Data Association) networking, which is used as an alternative to WiFi networking to allow laptops, PDAs, printers, and digital cameras to exchange data. This became its primary usage in the 2000s, due to the advent of technologies such as mobile broadband, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.
The non-profit Wi-Fi Alliance was formed in 1999 to fill this void—to establish and enforce standards for interoperability and backward compatibility, and to promote wireless local-area-network technology.

Syed Jafar

Syed Ali Jafar
In recent years, an important contribution to the growth of wireless communication networks has been interference alignment, which was discovered by Syed Ali Jafar at the University of California, Irvine.
His research interests include multi-user information theory, wireless communications and network coding.

RF power amplifier

RF amplifierpower amplifieramplified
Power MOSFETs such as LDMOS (lateral-diffused MOS) are used in RF power amplifiers to boost RF signals to a level that enables long-distance wireless network access for consumers, while RF CMOS (radio frequency CMOS) circuits are used in radio transceivers to transmit and receive wireless signals at low cost and with low power consumption.
RF power amplifiers using LDMOS (laterally diffused MOSFET) are the most widely used power semiconductor devices in wireless telecommunication networks, particularly mobile networks.