Wireless network

wireless networkingwireless networkswirelesswireless connectionwireless connectivitywireless infrastructurewireless computer networksWireless computingnetworkwireless computer network
A wireless network is a computer network that uses wireless data connections between network nodes.wikipedia
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Computer network

networkcomputer networkingnetworking
A wireless network is a computer network that uses wireless data connections between network nodes.
These data links are established over cable media such as twisted pair or fiber-optic cables, and wireless media such as Wi-Fi.

Radio

radio communicationradio communicationswireless
admin telecommunications networks are generally implemented and administered using radio communication.
In radio communication, used in radio and television broadcasting, cell phones, two-way radios, wireless networking and satellite communication among numerous other uses, radio waves are used to carry information across space from a transmitter to a receiver, by modulating the radio signal (impressing an information signal on the radio wave by varying some aspect of the wave) in the transmitter.

WaveLAN

Classic WaveLAN
The first commercial wireless network was the WaveLAN product family, developed by NCR in 1986.
WaveLAN was a brand name for a family of wireless networking technology sold by NCR, AT&T, Lucent Technologies, and Agere Systems as well as being sold by other companies under OEM agreements.

Microwave

microwavesmicrowave radiationmicrowave tube
Examples of wireless networks include cell phone networks, wireless local area networks (WLANs), wireless sensor networks, satellite communication networks, and terrestrial microwave networks. Fixed wireless technology implements point-to-point links between computers or networks at two distant locations, often using dedicated microwave or modulated laser light beams over line of sight paths.
Microwaves are widely used in modern technology, for example in point-to-point communication links, wireless networks, microwave radio relay networks, radar, satellite and spacecraft communication, medical diathermy and cancer treatment, remote sensing, radio astronomy, particle accelerators, spectroscopy, industrial heating, collision avoidance systems, garage door openers and keyless entry systems, and for cooking food in microwave ovens.

Base station

base stationsWireless base stationradio base station
Most of the essential elements of wireless networks are built from MOSFETs, including the mobile transceivers, base station modules, routers, RF power amplifiers, telecommunication circuits, RF circuits, and radio transceivers, in networks such as 2G, 3G, and 4G.
The term is used in the context of mobile telephony, wireless computer networking and other wireless communications and in land surveying.

Edholm's law

The wide adoption of RF CMOS (radio frequency CMOS), power MOSFET and LDMOS (lateral diffused MOS) devices led to the development and proliferation of digital wireless networks by the 1990s, with further advances in MOSFET technology leading to increasing bandwidth in the 2000s (Edholm's law).
He also found that there was a gradual convergence between wired (e.g. Ethernet), nomadic (e.g. modem and Wi-Fi) and wireless networks (e.g. cellular networks).

Wireless LAN

WLANwireless local area networkwireless
Examples of wireless networks include cell phone networks, wireless local area networks (WLANs), wireless sensor networks, satellite communication networks, and terrestrial microwave networks.
A wireless LAN (WLAN) is a wireless computer network that links two or more devices using wireless communication to form a local area network (LAN) within a limited area such as a home, school, computer laboratory, campus, office building etc. This gives users the ability to move around within the area and yet still be connected to the network.

Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing

OFDMCOFDMOFDM system comparison table
The use of spread-spectrum or OFDM technologies may allow users to move around within a local coverage area, and still remain connected to the network.
OFDM has developed into a popular scheme for wideband digital communication, used in applications such as digital television and audio broadcasting, DSL internet access, wireless networks, power line networks, and 4G mobile communications.

Wireless ad hoc network

mobile ad hoc networkad hocMANET
A wireless ad hoc network, also known as a wireless mesh network or mobile ad hoc network (MANET), is a wireless network made up of radio nodes organized in a mesh topology.
A wireless ad hoc network (WANET) or Mobile ad hoc network (MANET) is a decentralised type of wireless network.

Personal area network

wireless personal area networkPANWPAN
Wireless personal area networks (WPANs) connect devices within a relatively small area, that is generally within a person's reach.
A wireless personal area network (WPAN) is a PAN carried over a low-powered, short-distance wireless network technology such as IrDA, Wireless USB, Bluetooth or ZigBee.

Wireless WAN

WWANWireless Wide Area Networkwireless
Wireless wide area networks are wireless networks that typically cover large areas, such as between neighbouring towns and cities, or city and suburb.
Wireless wide area network (WWAN), is a form of wireless network.

MOSFET

metal-oxide-semiconductorMOSMOS integrated circuit
Advances in MOSFET (MOS transistor) wireless technology enabled the development of digital wireless networks.
As of 2008, the radio transceivers in all wireless networking devices and modern mobile phones are mass-produced as RF CMOS devices.

Microwave transmission

microwave radio relaymicrowave relaymicrowave link
The wireless connections between access points are usually point to point microwave links using parabolic dishes on the 2.4 GHz and 5.8Ghz band, rather than omnidirectional antennas used with smaller networks.
In recent years, there has been an explosive increase in use of the microwave spectrum by new telecommunication technologies such as wireless networks, and direct-broadcast satellites which broadcast television and radio directly into consumers' homes.

CMOS

RF CMOScomplementary metal–oxide–semiconductorcomplementary MOS
The wide adoption of RF CMOS (radio frequency CMOS), power MOSFET and LDMOS (lateral diffused MOS) devices led to the development and proliferation of digital wireless networks by the 1990s, with further advances in MOSFET technology leading to increasing bandwidth in the 2000s (Edholm's law).
The baseband processors and radio transceivers in all modern wireless networking devices and mobile phones are mass-produced using RF CMOS devices.

Cellular network

cellularmobile networkcellular networks
Examples of wireless networks include cell phone networks, wireless local area networks (WLANs), wireless sensor networks, satellite communication networks, and terrestrial microwave networks.
It was an analog wireless network.

Hidden node problem

Hidden terminal problemhidden station problem
The hidden node problem occurs in some types of network when a node is visible from a wireless access point (AP), but not from other nodes communicating with that AP.
In wireless networking, the hidden node problem or hidden terminal problem occurs when a node can communicate with a wireless access point (AP), but cannot directly communicate with other nodes that are communicating with that AP.

Omnidirectional antenna

non-directional antennaomnidirectionalnon-directional
The wireless connections between access points are usually point to point microwave links using parabolic dishes on the 2.4 GHz and 5.8Ghz band, rather than omnidirectional antennas used with smaller networks.
Omnidirectional antennas are widely used for radio broadcasting antennas, and in mobile devices that use radio such as cell phones, FM radios, walkie-talkies, wireless computer networks, cordless phones, GPS, as well as for base stations that communicate with mobile radios, such as police and taxi dispatchers and aircraft communications.

Point-to-point (telecommunications)

point-to-pointpoint to pointpoint-to-point link
The wireless connections between access points are usually point to point microwave links using parabolic dishes on the 2.4 GHz and 5.8Ghz band, rather than omnidirectional antennas used with smaller networks. Fixed wireless technology implements point-to-point links between computers or networks at two distant locations, often using dedicated microwave or modulated laser light beams over line of sight paths.
In modern computer networking, the term point-to-point telecommunications means a wireless data link between two fixed points.

Exposed node problem

exposed terminal problemexposed station problem
The exposed terminal problem is when a node on one network is unable to send because of co-channel interference from a node that is on a different network.
In wireless networks, the exposed node problem occurs when a node is prevented from sending packets to other nodes because of co-channel interference with a neighboring transmitter.

Wireless site survey

site surveysWi-Fi site surveysWireless survey
A wireless site survey, sometimes called an RF (Radio Frequency) site survey or wireless survey, is the process of planning and designing a wireless network, to provide a wireless solution that will deliver the required wireless coverage, data rates, network capacity, roaming capability and Quality of Service (QoS).

User-in-the-loop

User-in-the-loop (UIL) may be an alternative solution to ever upgrading to newer technologies for over-provisioning.
Another benefit in a wireless network is granting the user a higher bit rate, but only for the conforming user.

Rendezvous delay

Rendezvous delay is a term that pertains to mobile wireless networking, and the hand-off of a mobile device from one base station to a new base station.

Medium access control

media access controlMACMAC layer
This leads to difficulties in media access control (collisions).
Examples of shared physical media are bus networks, ring networks, hub networks, wireless networks and half-duplex point-to-point links.

Telecommunications network

networkcommunication networkcommunications network
Wireless networking is a method by which homes, telecommunications networks and business installations avoid the costly process of introducing cables into a building, or as a connection between various equipment locations.

OSI model

OSIOpen Systems InterconnectionOSI reference model
This implementation takes place at the physical level (layer) of the OSI model network structure.