Witch Fire

Witch Creek FireWitchPoomachaWitch CreekWitch Fire (2007)
The Witch Fire, also known as the Witch Creek Fire and the Witch–Guejito–Poomacha Complex Fire, was the second-largest wildfire of the 2007 California wildfire season, and the largest one of the October 2007 California wildfires.wikipedia
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October 2007 California wildfires

California wildfires of October 2007California wildfiresOctober 2007 wildfires
The Witch Fire, also known as the Witch Creek Fire and the Witch–Guejito–Poomacha Complex Fire, was the second-largest wildfire of the 2007 California wildfire season, and the largest one of the October 2007 California wildfires.

2007 California wildfires

2007 California wildfire season2007 San Diego wildfiresBuckweed
The Witch Fire, also known as the Witch Creek Fire and the Witch–Guejito–Poomacha Complex Fire, was the second-largest wildfire of the 2007 California wildfire season, and the largest one of the October 2007 California wildfires.

Poway, California

PowayPoway, CACarlsbad, California
The Witch Fire quickly spread to San Diego Country Estates, Ramona, Rancho Bernardo, Poway, and Escondido.
Major portions of the town were evacuated during both the 2003 Cedar Fire and 2007 Witch Creek Fire.

Ramona, California

RamonaRamona, CARamona Valley
The Witch Fire quickly spread to San Diego Country Estates, Ramona, Rancho Bernardo, Poway, and Escondido.
The Witch Fire began near Ramona near the area called Witch Creek on October 21, 2007.

Rancho Santa Fe, California

Rancho Santa FeRancho Santa Fe, CARancho Sante Fe
From there, the fire jumped over Interstate 15 and continued west, causing significant damage in Lake Hodges, Del Dios, and Rancho Santa Fe.
In 2007, the Witch Fire caused significant damage to Rancho Santa Fe, damaging or destroying over 80 homes.

San Diego Country Estates, California

San Diego Country Estates
The Witch Fire quickly spread to San Diego Country Estates, Ramona, Rancho Bernardo, Poway, and Escondido.
Several fires including the Witch Fire and Cedar Fire have begun near the Estates.

Rancho Bernardo, San Diego

Rancho BernardoRancho Bernardo, CaliforniaRancho Bernardo, San Diego, California
The Witch Fire quickly spread to San Diego Country Estates, Ramona, Rancho Bernardo, Poway, and Escondido.
On October 22, 2007, the Witch Creek Fire burned through Rancho Bernardo and several other populous areas of San Diego County, destroying hundreds of homes, and completely destroying several entire neighborhoods, particularly ones that firefighters had trouble accessing due to rugged terrain and rapidly advancing flames pushed by strong Santa Ana winds.

Zaca Fire

ZacaZaca Fire of 2007
Although the Witch Fire was individually smaller than the Zaca Fire of 2007 (which burned at least 240,207 acre), burning 197,990 acre acres alone, after merging with the Poomacha and McCoy Fires, the Witch–Guejito–Poomacha Complex Fire had a total burn area of 247,800 acre, surpassing the Zaca Fire to become the largest complex fire of 2007.

Cedar Fire

Cedar Fire (2003)Cedar Fire of 2003Cedar
This evacuation came almost four years to the day after the Cedar Fire of 2003.

Harris Fire

Harris
The wildfire was the second-largest one of the October 2007 California wildfires, behind only the Witch Fire.

San Diego County, California

San Diego CountySan DiegoSan Diego metropolitan area
The most recent are the December 2017 Lilac Fire and the May 2014 San Diego County wildfires; before them was the Witch Creek Fire in 2007 and the Cedar Fire in 2003.

List of California wildfires

California wildfireswildfire in modern California historyCalifornia history

Witch Creek, San Diego County, California

Witch Creek
Initially igniting in Witch Creek Canyon, near Santa Ysabel, the Witch Creek Fire rapidly spread westward, fanned by powerful Santa Ana winds, and consumed large portions of San Diego County. The Witch Creek Fire started in Witch Creek Canyon near Santa Ysabel, at 12:35 PM PDT on Sunday, October 21, 2007, after powerful Santa Ana winds blew down a power line, releasing sparks into the wind.

Santa Ana winds

Santa Ana windSanta AnaSanta Anas
Initially igniting in Witch Creek Canyon, near Santa Ysabel, the Witch Creek Fire rapidly spread westward, fanned by powerful Santa Ana winds, and consumed large portions of San Diego County.

Palomar Mountain

Palomar Mountain RangePalomar Mountain State ParkPalomar Mountains
On October 25, the Witch Fire merged with the Poomacha Fire to the north, near Palomar Mountain, before also merging with the smaller McCoy Fire on the next day.

Firestorm

fire stormfirestormscyclone of fire
During its duration, 80–100 feet-high flames were reported by fire officials in the Witch Fire, and the Witch Fire exhibited the characteristics of a firestorm at its height.

Reverse 9-1-1

Reverse 911community notification system
On the morning of October 22, 2007, about a day after the Witch Creek Fire had ignited, residents were ordered to evacuate through the Reverse 911 system.

San Diego

San Diego, CaliforniaSan Diego, CACity of San Diego
Eventually, the Witch Creek Fire led to the evacuations of 500,000 people, 200,000 of whom lived within the City of San Diego.

Santa Ysabel, California

Santa YsabelElcuananSanta Isabel
The Witch Creek Fire started in Witch Creek Canyon near Santa Ysabel, at 12:35 PM PDT on Sunday, October 21, 2007, after powerful Santa Ana winds blew down a power line, releasing sparks into the wind.

Escondido, California

EscondidoEscondido, CACity of Escondido
The Witch Fire quickly spread to San Diego Country Estates, Ramona, Rancho Bernardo, Poway, and Escondido. From there, the fire jumped over Interstate 15 and continued west, causing significant damage in Lake Hodges, Del Dios, and Rancho Santa Fe.

San Diego Zoo Safari Park

San Diego Wild Animal ParkWild Animal ParkSan Diego Zoo & Safari Park
At 1:30 AM PDT on October 22, 2007, the Guejito Fire ignited southeast of the San Diego Wild Animal Park, within the San Pasqual River drainage.

Interstate 15 in California

Interstate 15I-15State Route 15
From there, the fire jumped over Interstate 15 and continued west, causing significant damage in Lake Hodges, Del Dios, and Rancho Santa Fe.