Withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq

Withdrawalimmediate withdrawalwithdrawal of US troops from Iraqdeparture of US troopsendphased military redeploymentphased redeploymenttroop withdrawal from IraqU.S. withdrawal from IraqUS withdrawal from Iraq
The withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Iraq began in December 2007 with the end of the Iraq War troop surge of 2007 and was completed by December 2011, bringing an end to the Iraq War.wikipedia
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Iraq War

Operation Iraqi FreedomIraqwar in Iraq
The withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Iraq began in December 2007 with the end of the Iraq War troop surge of 2007 and was completed by December 2011, bringing an end to the Iraq War.
The last U.S. combat brigades departed Iraq in the early morning of 19 August.

U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007

benchmarksHR 2206Iraq withdrawal benchmarks
Congress then passed [[U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007|H.R. 2206]], which provided funding for the Iraq War through 30 September 2007 and was signed into law by President Bush on 25 May 2007.
A prior version of the act, included a timeline for withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq.

Barack Obama

ObamaPresident ObamaPresident Barack Obama
On 27 February 2009, at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, President Barack Obama announced his revision to the original date of withdrawal of combat troops from Iraq.
In foreign policy, he increased U.S. troop levels in Afghanistan, reduced nuclear weapons with the United States–Russia New START treaty, and ended military involvement in the Iraq War.

U.S.–Iraq Status of Forces Agreement

U.S.-Iraq Status of Forces AgreementStrategic Framework AgreementStatus of Forces Agreement
The Bush Administration later sought an agreement with the Iraqi government, and in 2008 George W. Bush signed the U.S.–Iraq Status of Forces Agreement.

Private military company

private military contractorprivate military contractorsprivate military companies
After the withdrawal of US troops from Iraq, the U.S. State Department is reportedly planning to more than double the number of its private security guards, up to as many as 7,000.

American-led intervention in Iraq (2014–present)

American-led intervention in IraqIraq2014 American intervention in Iraq
In 2014, the advance of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) from Syria to Iraq's western provinces prompted the U.S. to intervene again, alongside other militaries, to combat ISIL.
In 2011, the U.S. had withdrawn most of its troops from Iraq, and later kept 20,000 employees in its embassy and consulates, including dozens of U.S. Marine Embassy Guards and approximately 4,500 private military contractors.

Withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan

withdrawUnited States troops withdraw from Afghanistan2009 increase in U.S. troop levels in Afghanistan
"We have been abundantly clear about the stages of the implementation of that policy. And as in Iraq, that means that while not all U.S. troops will have withdrawn necessarily by then, the Afghan Security Forces will be in full security transition, I mean, will be in full security lead, and U.S. forces will continue to be drawn down."

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
American forces in Iraq were withdrawn in large numbers in 2009 and 2010, and the war in the region was declared formally over in December 2011.

Islamic State of Iraq

ISIal-Qaeda in IraqIslamic State
Between the withdrawal of US troops from Iraq in late 2011, and late 2012, estimates of its strength more than doubled, from 1,000 to 2,500 fighters.

Iraq

Republic of IraqIraqiIrak
The withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Iraq was a contentious issue in the United States for much of the 2000s.
Following the withdrawal of US troops in 2011, the insurgency continued and Iraq suffered from political instability.

Iraq War troop surge of 2007

surgetroop surgeThe Surge
The withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Iraq began in December 2007 with the end of the Iraq War troop surge of 2007 and was completed by December 2011, bringing an end to the Iraq War.

United States Forces – Iraq

U.S. forces from IraqUnited States Forces - IraqU.S. Forces - Iraq
The withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Iraq was a contentious issue in the United States for much of the 2000s.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
In late April 2007 Congress passed a supplementary spending bill for Iraq that set a deadline for troop withdrawal but President Bush vetoed this bill, citing his concerns about setting a withdrawal deadline.

George W. Bush

BushPresident BushPresident George W. Bush
The Bush Administration later sought an agreement with the Iraqi government, and in 2008 George W. Bush signed the U.S.–Iraq Status of Forces Agreement. In late April 2007 Congress passed a supplementary spending bill for Iraq that set a deadline for troop withdrawal but President Bush vetoed this bill, citing his concerns about setting a withdrawal deadline. The issue was one on which John Kerry and George W. Bush differed in the 2004 U.S. presidential election.

Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

ISISISILIslamic State
In 2014, the advance of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) from Syria to Iraq's western provinces prompted the U.S. to intervene again, alongside other militaries, to combat ISIL.

Public opinion in the United States on the invasion of Iraq

Popular opinion in the United States on the invasion of IraqAmerican popular opinion on invasion of Iraqpolls within the United States
Immediately before and after the 2003 invasion, most polls within the United States showed a substantial majority supporting war, though since December 2004 polls consistently showed that a majority thought the invasion was a mistake.

John Kerry

KerryJohn F. KerryJohn Forbes Kerry
The issue was one on which John Kerry and George W. Bush differed in the 2004 U.S. presidential election.

2004 United States presidential election

20042004 presidential electionPresident
The issue was one on which John Kerry and George W. Bush differed in the 2004 U.S. presidential election.

United States Secretary of Defense

Secretary of DefenseU.S. Secretary of DefenseDefense Secretary
When questioned about troop strength, Bush and then-Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld said that they were using the troops asked for by the general staff.

Donald Rumsfeld

Donald H. RumsfeldRumsfeldDon Rumsfeld
When questioned about troop strength, Bush and then-Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld said that they were using the troops asked for by the general staff.

John Murtha

John P. MurthaJack MurthaJohn Murtha (D)
On 17 November 2005 Representative John Murtha (D-PA) introduced, a resolution calling for U.S. forces in Iraq to be "redeployed at the earliest practicable date" to stand as a quick-reaction force in U.S. bases in neighboring countries such as Kuwait.

Kuwait

State of KuwaitKuwaitiKWT
On 17 November 2005 Representative John Murtha (D-PA) introduced, a resolution calling for U.S. forces in Iraq to be "redeployed at the earliest practicable date" to stand as a quick-reaction force in U.S. bases in neighboring countries such as Kuwait.

Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
In response, Republicans proposed a resolution that "the deployment of United States forces in Iraq be terminated immediately," without any provision for redeployment, which was voted down 403–3.