Wola massacre

massacre in Wolamassacred in the districts of Wolaobliteratedthe largest single massacre by German forces took place in Wolaweek-long massacreWolaWola district, where mass executions of civilians occurred
The Wola massacre (Rzeź Woli, "Wola slaughter") was the systematic killing of between 40,000 and 50,000 people in the Wola district of Poland's capital city Warsaw by German troops and collaborationist forces during the early phase of the Warsaw Uprising.wikipedia
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Wola

Wola DistrictPowązkiWarszawa Wola
The Wola massacre (Rzeź Woli, "Wola slaughter") was the systematic killing of between 40,000 and 50,000 people in the Wola district of Poland's capital city Warsaw by German troops and collaborationist forces during the early phase of the Warsaw Uprising. From 5 to 12 August 1944, tens of thousands of Polish civilians along with captured Home Army resistance fighters were brutally and systematically murdered by the Germans in organised mass executions throughout Wola.
Around 8 August, Wola was the scene of the largest single massacre by German forces in Poland of 40,000 to 50,000 civilians.

Sub-district III of Wola (of Armia Krajowa)

Area III (Wola)Armia Krajowainsurrectionists
No distinction would be made between insurrectionists and civilians.
During the house-to-house fighting, Nazi troops from the S.S. Sturmbrigade R.O.N.A. and the SS-Dirlewanger Brigade committed the Wola Massacre killing between 40,000 to 50,000 Polish civilians.

Warsaw Uprising

WarsawUprising1944 Warsaw Uprising
The Wola massacre (Rzeź Woli, "Wola slaughter") was the systematic killing of between 40,000 and 50,000 people in the Wola district of Poland's capital city Warsaw by German troops and collaborationist forces during the early phase of the Warsaw Uprising.
Wola massacre

Human shield

human shieldsshieldcrowd as a shield
To enhance their effectiveness, the Germans began to use civilians as human shields when approaching positions held by the Polish resistance.
At the Wola massacre in Poland on 7 August 1944, the Nazis forced civilian women onto the armored vehicles as human shields to enhance their effectiveness.

Verbrennungskommando Warschau

VerbrennungskommandoGermans burned the bodies
Between 8 and 23 August the SS formed groups of men from the Wola district into the so-called Verbrennungskommando ("burning detachment"), who were forced to hide evidence of the massacre by burning the victims' bodies and homes.
Verbrennungskommando Warschau (Warsaw burning detachment) was a slave labour unit formed by the SS following the Wola massacre of around 40,000 to 50,000 Polish civilians by the Germans in the early days of the Warsaw Uprising of 1944.

Dirlewanger Brigade

36th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SSDirlewangerBrigade
The German forces consisted of units from the Wehrmacht and the SS Police Battalions, as well as the mostly Russian SS-Sturmbrigade RONA and the SS-Sturmbrigade Dirlewanger, an infamous Waffen SS penal unit led by Oskar Dirlewanger.
In what became known as the Wola massacre, Kaminski and Dirlewanger personnel indiscriminately massacred Polish combatants along with civilian men, women and children, in the Wola District of Warsaw.

Waffen-SS

SSWaffen SSSS division
The German forces consisted of units from the Wehrmacht and the SS Police Battalions, as well as the mostly Russian SS-Sturmbrigade RONA and the SS-Sturmbrigade Dirlewanger, an infamous Waffen SS penal unit led by Oskar Dirlewanger.
The Dirlewanger brigade committed almost non-stop atrocities during this period, in particular the four-day Wola massacre.

Oskar Dirlewanger

DirlewangerDr. Oskar DirlewangerSS-''Oberführer'' Oskar Dirlewanger
The German forces consisted of units from the Wehrmacht and the SS Police Battalions, as well as the mostly Russian SS-Sturmbrigade RONA and the SS-Sturmbrigade Dirlewanger, an infamous Waffen SS penal unit led by Oskar Dirlewanger. The main perpetrators of the Wola massacre and similar massacres in the nearby Ochota district were Heinz Reinefarth and Oskar Dirlewanger.
In Warsaw, Dirlewanger participated in the Wola massacre, together with police units rounding up and shooting some 40,000 civilians, most of them in just two days.

Heinz Reinefarth

ReinefarthHeinrich-Friedrich Reinefarth
Shortly after their advance toward the centre of Warsaw began, the two lead battle groups — Kampfgruppe "Rohr" (led by Generalmajor Günter Rohr) and Kampfgruppe "Reinefarth" (led by Heinz Reinefarth) — were halted by heavy fire from Polish resistance fighters. The main perpetrators of the Wola massacre and similar massacres in the nearby Ochota district were Heinz Reinefarth and Oskar Dirlewanger.
In two days, the units of Reinefarth and SS-Oberführer Oskar Dirlewanger executed approximately 60,000 civilian inhabitants of Warsaw in what is known as the Wola Massacre.

Erich von dem Bach-Zelewski

Erich von dem BachErich von dem Bach–ZelewskiGeneral Erich von dem Bach
Two days after the start of the fighting, SS General Erich von dem Bach-Zelewski was placed in command of all German forces in Warsaw.
After more than two months of heavy fighting and the total destruction of Warsaw, Bach-Zelewski managed to take control of the city, committing atrocities in the process, notably the Wola massacre.

Wola Massacre Memorial on Górczewska Street

greatest number of executionsrailway embankment
The greatest number of killings took place at the railway embankment on Górczewska Street and two large factories on Wolska Street — the Ursus Factory at Wolska 55 and the Franaszka Factory at Wolska 41/45 — as well as the Pfeiffer Factory at 57/59 Okopowa Street.
A large cross and several memorial plaques commemorate the place which was the principal execution site used by the Nazi German occupiers of Warsaw during the Wola massacre, one of the most brutal massacres of civilians during the Second World War, which took place between 5 and 12 August 1944, in the early days of the Warsaw Uprising.

Ochota massacre

Ochotaan orgy of civilian killings, rape and lootingmassacre of residents
The main perpetrators of the Wola massacre and similar massacres in the nearby Ochota district were Heinz Reinefarth and Oskar Dirlewanger.
Wola Massacre

Nazi crimes against the Polish nation

Polesethnic Polesa surge in Polish arrests
Nazi crimes against ethnic Poles
The most notorious occurrence took place in Wola where, at the beginning of August 1944, between 40–50,000 civilians (men, women, and children) were methodically rounded-up and executed by the Einsatzkommando of the Sicherheitspolizei under Heinz Reinefarth's command and the amnestied German criminals from Dirlewanger.

Warsaw

WarszawaWarsaw, Polandcapital of Poland
The Wola massacre (Rzeź Woli, "Wola slaughter") was the systematic killing of between 40,000 and 50,000 people in the Wola district of Poland's capital city Warsaw by German troops and collaborationist forces during the early phase of the Warsaw Uprising.

Nazi Germany

GermanGermanyNazi
The Wola massacre (Rzeź Woli, "Wola slaughter") was the systematic killing of between 40,000 and 50,000 people in the Wola district of Poland's capital city Warsaw by German troops and collaborationist forces during the early phase of the Warsaw Uprising.

Home Army

AKPolish Home ArmyPolish resistance
From 5 to 12 August 1944, tens of thousands of Polish civilians along with captured Home Army resistance fighters were brutally and systematically murdered by the Germans in organised mass executions throughout Wola. During the first few days the Polish resistance managed to liberate most of Warsaw on the left bank of the river Vistula (an uprising also broke out in the district of Praga on the right bank but was quickly suppressed by the Germans).

Vistula

Vistula RiverWisłaRiver Vistula
During the first few days the Polish resistance managed to liberate most of Warsaw on the left bank of the river Vistula (an uprising also broke out in the district of Praga on the right bank but was quickly suppressed by the Germans).

Praga

Stara PragaPraga district of WarsawPrague District
During the first few days the Polish resistance managed to liberate most of Warsaw on the left bank of the river Vistula (an uprising also broke out in the district of Praga on the right bank but was quickly suppressed by the Germans).

Schutzstaffel

SSßNazi SS
Two days after the start of the fighting, SS General Erich von dem Bach-Zelewski was placed in command of all German forces in Warsaw.

Obergruppenführer

SS-Obergruppenführer und General der Waffen-SSSS-ObergruppenführerSS-Obergruppenführer and General of the Waffen-SS
Two days after the start of the fighting, SS General Erich von dem Bach-Zelewski was placed in command of all German forces in Warsaw.

Heinrich Himmler

HimmlerAlfred HimmlerH Himmler
Following direct orders from SS-Reichfuhrer Heinrich Himmler to suppress the uprising without mercy, his strategy was to include the use of terror tactics against the inhabitants of Warsaw.

State terrorism

state terrorstate violenceterror
Following direct orders from SS-Reichfuhrer Heinrich Himmler to suppress the uprising without mercy, his strategy was to include the use of terror tactics against the inhabitants of Warsaw.

Timothy D. Snyder

Timothy SnyderSnyder, TimothyProfessor Timothy Snyder
Professor Timothy Snyder, of Yale University, wrote that "the massacres in Wola had nothing in common with combat ... the ratio of civilian to military dead was more than a thousand to one, even if military casualties on both sides are counted."

Yale University

YaleYale CollegeCollegiate School
Professor Timothy Snyder, of Yale University, wrote that "the massacres in Wola had nothing in common with combat ... the ratio of civilian to military dead was more than a thousand to one, even if military casualties on both sides are counted."

Wolska Street

Wolska174/176 Wolska Street60 Wolska Street
On 5 August, three German battle groups started their advance toward the city centre from the western outskirts of the Wola district, along Wolska and Górczewska streets.