Wolof language

WolofwolClassical WolofGambian WolofGarayJaloof (Wolof)wofWolof-languageWoloof
Wolof is a language of Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania, and the native language of the Wolof people.wikipedia
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Senegal

🇸🇳SENSenegalese
Wolof is a language of Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania, and the native language of the Wolof people.
The name "Senegal" comes from the Wolof "Sunuu Gaal", which means "Our Boat".

Mauritania

🇲🇷MauritaneanMauritanian
Wolof is a language of Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania, and the native language of the Wolof people.
Mauritania ((موريتانيا, ', Mauritanie) is officially known as the Islamic Republic of Mauritania'. In other languages, it is known variously as Agawej or Cengiṭ (Berber), Gànnaar (Wolof), Murutaane (Soninke), and Moritani'' (Pulaar).

Fula language

FulaFulaniFulfulde
Like the neighbouring languages Serer and Fula, it belongs to the Senegambian branch of the Niger–Congo language family.
Along with other related languages such as Serer and Wolof, it belongs to the Senegambian branch within the Niger–Congo languages, which does not have tones, unlike most other Niger–Congo languages.

Wolof people

WolofWolofsLebu
Wolof is a language of Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania, and the native language of the Wolof people.
They refer to themselves as Wolof and speak the Wolof language – a West Atlantic branch of the Niger–Congo family of languages.

Jollof rice

BenachinJollof
Variants include the older French Ouolof and the principally Gambian Wollof, Jolof, jollof, etc., which now typically refers either to the Jolof Empire or to jollof rice, a common West African rice dish.
Jollof rice or just jollof, also called Benachin (Wolof: "one pot"), is a one-pot rice dish popular in many West African countries.

Serer language

SererSerer-Sine languageSerer proper
Like the neighbouring languages Serer and Fula, it belongs to the Senegambian branch of the Niger–Congo language family.
However, a widely-cited misreading of the data by Wilson (1989) inadvertently exchanged Serer for Wolof.

Niger–Congo languages

Niger–CongoNiger-CongoNiger–Congo language family
Like the neighbouring languages Serer and Fula, it belongs to the Senegambian branch of the Niger–Congo language family.
The polyphyletic Atlantic group accounts for about 35 million speakers as of 2016, mostly accounted for by Fula and Wolof speakers.

Saint-Louis, Senegal

Saint-LouisSaint LouisSt-Louis
In the whole region from Dakar to Saint-Louis, and also west and southwest of Kaolack, Wolof is spoken by the vast majority of the people.
Saint-Louis, or Ndar as it is called in Wolof, is the capital of Senegal's Saint-Louis Region.

Kaolack

In the whole region from Dakar to Saint-Louis, and also west and southwest of Kaolack, Wolof is spoken by the vast majority of the people.
Kaolack (Kawlax in Wolof) is a town of 172,305 people (2002 census) on the north bank of the Saloum River and the N1 road in Senegal.

Banana

bananasbanana treebanana flower
The English language is believed to have adopted some Wolof words, such as banana, via Spanish or Portuguese, and yum/yummy, from Wolof nyam "to taste"; nyam in several Caribbean English Creoles meaning "to eat" (compare Seychellois Creole nyanmnyanm, also meaning "to eat").
The word banana is thought to be of West African origin, possibly from the Wolof word banaana, and passed into English via Spanish or Portuguese.

Arabic

Arabic-languageArabArabic language
"Dakar-Wolof", for instance, is an urban mixture of Wolof, French, and Arabic.
Arabic is also an important source of vocabulary for languages such as Amharic, Baluchi, Bengali, Berber, Bosnian, Chaldean, Chechen, Croatian, Dagestani, English, German, Gujarati, Hausa, Hindi, Kazakh, Kurdish, Kutchi, Kyrgyz, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Pashto, Persian, Punjabi, Rohingya, Romance languages (French, Catalan, Italian, Portuguese, Sicilian, Spanish, etc.) Saraiki, Sindhi, Somali, Sylheti, Swahili, Tagalog, Tigrinya, Turkish, Turkmen, Urdu, Uyghur, Uzbek, Visayan and Wolof, as well as other languages in countries where these languages are spoken.

Jolof Empire

JolofWolofJolof / Wolof Empire
Variants include the older French Ouolof and the principally Gambian Wollof, Jolof, jollof, etc., which now typically refers either to the Jolof Empire or to jollof rice, a common West African rice dish.
One suggests that he was "the first and only son of a noble and saintly Berber Almoravid father Abubakr Ibn Omar also called Abu Dardai and a Toucouleur princess who was the daughter of the Lam Toro, Fatimata Sall. This gives him an Almoravid lineage, ie a Berber and Islamic background, on his father's side, and a link on his mother's side to the Takrur aristocracy. James Searing adds that "In all versions of the myth, Njaajaan Njaay speaks his first words in Pulaar rather than Wolof, emphasizing once again his character as a stranger of noble origins."

Senegambian languages

SenegambianTendaSenegambian branch
Like the neighbouring languages Serer and Fula, it belongs to the Senegambian branch of the Niger–Congo language family.
The most populous unitary language is Wolof, the national language of Senegal, with four million native speakers and millions more second-language users.

Centre de linguistique appliquée de Dakar

The language institute "Centre de linguistique appliquée de Dakar" (CLAD) is widely acknowledged as an authority when it comes to spelling rules for Wolof.
The Centre de linguistique appliquée de Dakar (French for "Center of Applied Linguistics of Dakar"), abbreviated CLAD, is a language institute, which especially plays an important role in the orthographical standardization of the Wolof language.

Lebu Wolof

Lebu Wolof, on the other hand, is unintelligible with standard Wolof, a distinction that has been obscured because all Lebu speakers are bilingual in standard Wolof.
Lebu Wolof (Lebou Oulof) is a language of Senegal that is closely related to, but not mutually intelligible with, Wolof proper.

Final-obstruent devoicing

final devoicingterminal devoicingdevoiced
Phonetic p c k do occur finally, but only as allophones of b j g due to final devoicing.
Final-obstruent devoicing or terminal devoicing is a systematic phonological process occurring in languages such as Catalan, German, Dutch, Breton, Russian, Turkish, and Wolof.

Arabic script

ArabicArabic alphabetArabic alphabets
Additionally, two other scripts exist: a traditional Arabic-based transcription of Wolof called Wolofal, which dates back to the pre-colonial period and is still used by many people, and the Garay script, dating to 1961, which has been adopted by a small number of Wolof-speakers
Wolof (at zaouia schools), known as Wolofal.

Tone (linguistics)

tonetonal languagetones
Unlike most other languages of the Niger-Congo family, Wolof is not a tonal language.
Most languages of Sub-Saharan Africa are members of the Niger-Congo family, which is predominantly tonal; notable exceptions are Swahili (in the southeast), most languages spoken in the Senegambia (among them Wolof, Serer and Cangin languages), and Fulani.

7 Seconds (song)

7 SecondsSeven Seconds7 Seconds" (song)
The 1994 song "7 Seconds" by Youssou N'Dour and Neneh Cherry is partially sung in Wolof.
The song is trilingual as N'Dour sings in 3 languages: French, English and the West African language Wolof.

List of proposed etymologies of OK

Okaysome sources
"Okay" may be Wolof waaw-kay, “yes,” with a suffix of emphasis, becoming “I agree," or "I will comply.” Wolof is reputed to have been a lingua franca among slaves in the USA, and to have had a strong influence on colloquial American English.

Wolofal script

Wolofal
Additionally, two other scripts exist: a traditional Arabic-based transcription of Wolof called Wolofal, which dates back to the pre-colonial period and is still used by many people, and the Garay script, dating to 1961, which has been adopted by a small number of Wolof-speakers
Wolofal is a derivation of the Arabic script for writing the Wolof language.

Pidgin Wolof

* Pidgin Wolof
Pidgin Wolof is a pidgin language based on Wolof, spoken in the Gambia.

The Gambia

Gambia🇬🇲Gambian
Wolof is a language of Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania, and the native language of the Wolof people.
Other languages are Mandinka, Wolof, Fula, Serer, Krio, Jola and other indigenous vernaculars.

Lebu people

LebouLebous
Wolof originated as the language of the Lebu people.

Dialect

dialect clusterdialectslanguage cluster
Wolof dialects vary geographically and between rural and urban areas.