Wolof people

WolofWolofsLebuGelofeWollofWollofsWolof cultureWolof ethnic group
The Wolof people are a West African ethnic group found in northwestern Senegal, The Gambia and southwestern coastal Mauritania.wikipedia
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Wolof language

WolofwolClassical Wolof
They refer to themselves as Wolof and speak the Wolof language – a West Atlantic branch of the Niger–Congo family of languages.
Wolof is a language of Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania, and the native language of the Wolof people.

Mauritania

🇲🇷MauritaneanMauritanian
The Wolof people are a West African ethnic group found in northwestern Senegal, The Gambia and southwestern coastal Mauritania.
After gaining independence, larger numbers of indigenous Sub-Saharan African peoples (Haalpulaar, Soninke, and Wolof) entered Mauritania, moving into the area north of the Senegal River.

West Africa

Westwestern AfricaWestern
The Wolof people are a West African ethnic group found in northwestern Senegal, The Gambia and southwestern coastal Mauritania.
In the United Nations scheme of African regions, the region of Western Africa includes 16 states and the United Kingdom Overseas Territory of Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha: Mali, Burkina Faso, Senegal and the Niger are mostly in the Sahel, a transition zone between the Sahara desert and the Sudanian Savanna; Benin, Ivory Coast, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Togo and Nigeria compose most of Guinea, the traditional name for the area near the Gulf of Guinea; Mauritania lies in the Maghreb, the northwestern region of Africa that has historically been inhabited by both traditionally West African groups such as the Fulani, Soninke and Wolof, along with Arab-Berber Maghrebi people; Cape Verde is an island country in the Atlantic Ocean; and Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha consists of eight main islands located in four different parts of the Atlantic.

Alvise Cadamosto

Ca' de MostoCadamostoCadamosto. Alvise
The earliest documented mention of the Wolof is found in the records of 15th-century Portuguese financed Italian traveller Alvise Cadamosto, who mentioned well established Islamic Wolof chiefs advised by Muslim counselors and divines.
He dates that trade between the Portuguese and the Wolof people of the Senegal region was opened around 1450 ("five years before I went on this voyage").

Jolof Empire

JolofWolofJolof / Wolof Empire
The Wolof belonged to the medieval era Wolof Empire of Senegambia region.
Traditional accounts among the Wolof agree that the founder of the state and later empire was the possibly mythical Ndiadiane Ndiaye (also spelled Njaajaan Njaay).

Jollof rice

BenachinJollof
Similarly, a West African rice dish is known in English as jollof rice.
The name Jollof derives from the name of the Wolof people, though in Senegal and Gambia the dish is referred to in Wolof as ceebu jën or benachin.

Tijaniyyah

TijaniTijanTijaniyya
Contemporary Wolofs are predominantly Sufi Muslims belonging to Mouride and Tijaniyyah Islamic brotherhoods.
In Senegal's Wolof country, especially the northern regions of Kajoor and Jolof, the Tijānī Order was spread primarily by El-Hajj Malick Sy (spelled "El-Hadji Malick Sy" in French, "Allaaji Maalig Si" in Wolof), born in 1855 near Dagana.

Muslim brotherhoods of Senegal

Muslim brotherhoodsIslamic BrotherhoodSenegalese brotherhoods
The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods appeared in the Wolof communities in the 19th century and grew in the 20th.
Their members are mainly Wolofs, Fulas and Tocouleurs.

Mouride

MouridismMuridBaye Fall
Contemporary Wolofs are predominantly Sufi Muslims belonging to Mouride and Tijaniyyah Islamic brotherhoods.
Traditional Wolof aristocrats had proven problematic as intermediaries for the colonial authorities, and they hoped that Mouride leaders would be more effective and legitimate.

The Gambia

Gambia🇬🇲Gambian
The Wolof people are a West African ethnic group found in northwestern Senegal, The Gambia and southwestern coastal Mauritania.
The Mandinka ethnicity is the largest, followed by the Fula, Wolof, Jola/Karoninka, Serahule / Jahanka, Serers, Manjago, Bambara, Aku Marabou and others.

Imamate of Futa Toro

Futa Toro
Before the Wolof people became involved in goods and slave trading with the Portuguese merchants on the coast, they had a long tradition of established trading of goods and slaves with the Western Sudanese empires and with Imamate of Futa Toro and other ethnic groups in North Africa.
Abdul Kader defeated the emirates of Trarza and Brakna to the north, but was defeated and captured when he attacked the Wolof states of Cayor and Waalo around 1797.

Kingdom of Jolof

JolofDjoloffounding king of Jolof
Details of the pre-Islamic religious traditions of Wolof are unknown, and their oral traditions state them to have been adherents of Islam since the founding king of Jolof.
Wolof people

Senegal

🇸🇳SENSenegalese
The Wolof people are a West African ethnic group found in northwestern Senegal, The Gambia and southwestern coastal Mauritania.
The Wolof are the largest single ethnic group in Senegal at 43 percent; the Fula and Toucouleur (also known as Halpulaar'en, literally "Pulaar-speakers") (24%) are the second biggest group, followed by the Serer (14.7%), then others such as Jola (4%), Mandinka (3%), Maures or (Naarkajors), Soninke, Bassari and many smaller communities (9%).

Senegal River

SenegalSénégal River AreaSénégal
The Wolof people are the largest ethnic group in Senegal, particularly concentrated in its northwestern region near the Senegal River and the Gambia River.
Realizing the mistake, Henry kept pressing his captains further down the coast, and in 1445, the Portuguese captain Nuno Tristão finally reached the Langue de Barbarie, where he noticed the desert end and the treeline begin, and the population change from 'tawny' Sanhaja Berbers to 'black' Wolof people.

Djibril Diop Mambéty

Djibril Diop Mambety’
Djibril Diop Mambéty (film director)
Born to a Muslim family near Dakar, Senegal's capital city, Mambéty was Wolof.

Nyamakala

Nyaxamalonyenyo
The leatherworkers, for example, were considered the lowest of the nyenyo because their occupation involving animal skins was considered dirty.
The Nyamakala are known as Nyaxamalo among the Soninke people, and Nyenyo among the Wolof people.

Serer people

SererSerersSereer
According to James Olson – professor of History specializing on Ethnic Group studies, the Serer people "violently resisted the expansion of Islam" by the Wolof people in the 19th century, and then became a target of the 1861 jihad led by the Mandinka cleric Ma Ba Jaxoo.

Lebu people

LebouLebous
Wolof originated as the language of the Lebu people.
Wolof people

Atlantic languages

AtlanticWest AtlanticAtlantic language
They refer to themselves as Wolof and speak the Wolof language – a West Atlantic branch of the Niger–Congo family of languages.

Oral tradition

oral traditionsoral cultureoral transmission
Their early history is unclear and based on oral traditions that link the Wolof to the Almoravids.

Almoravid dynasty

AlmoravidsAlmoravidAlmoravid Empire
Their early history is unclear and based on oral traditions that link the Wolof to the Almoravids.

Jihad

holy warjihādoffensive jihad
In and after the 18th century, the Wolofs were impacted by the violent jihads in West Africa, which triggered internal disagreements among the Wolof on Islam.

Sufism

SufiSufistasawwuf
Contemporary Wolofs are predominantly Sufi Muslims belonging to Mouride and Tijaniyyah Islamic brotherhoods.

Senegambia

Sene-Gambian regionSenegambia RegionSenegambian region
The origins of the Wolof people are obscure, states David Gamble – a professor of Anthropology specializing on Senegambia and Africa studies.

Ghana Empire

Wagadou (Ghana Empire)Ghanaancient Ghana
According to Gamble, this migration likely occurred at the end of 11th century when the Ghana Empire fell to the Muslim armies from Sudan.