Woody Herman

Woody Herman and His OrchestraHerman, WoodyFour BrothersWoody Herman BandWoody Herman OrchestraFour Brothers (jazz band)Hermanthe Woody Herman OrchestraWoody Herman & his OrchestraWoody Herman & The Young Thundering Herd
Woodrow Charles Herman (May 16, 1913 – October 29, 1987) was an American jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, singer, and big band leader.wikipedia
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Big band

big bandsbig-bandbig band music
Woodrow Charles Herman (May 16, 1913 – October 29, 1987) was an American jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, singer, and big band leader.
In the 1940s, Stan Kenton's band and Woody Herman's band used up to five trumpets, four trombones (three tenor, one bass trombone), five saxophones (two alto saxophones, two tenor saxophones, one baritone saxophone), and a rhythm section.

Jazz

jazz musicContemporary jazzModern Jazz
Woodrow Charles Herman (May 16, 1913 – October 29, 1987) was an American jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, singer, and big band leader.
Women were members of the big bands of Woody Herman and Gerald Wilson.

Do Nothing till You Hear from Me

Do Nothin' Till You Hear from MeDo Nothing 'Til You Hear From MeConcerto for Cootie
Other hits for the band include "Blue Flame" and "Do Nothin' Till You Hear from Me".
Other recordings to reach the Billboard charts in 1944 were by Woody Herman and by Stan Kenton (vocal: Red Dorris).

Blues in the Night

Blues in the Night (My Mama Done Tol' Me)
In January 1942, Herman would have his highest rated single (#1 in the Billboard charts), singing Harold Arlen's "Blues in the Night" backed by his orchestra.
Recorded versions that charted in the United States were by Woody Herman, Dinah Shore, Jimmie Lunceford, Cab Calloway, Artie Shaw, and Rosemary Clooney.

Ralph Burns

Burns
The fact that Herman commissioned Gillespie to write arrangements for the band and that Herman hired Ralph Burns as a staff arranger, heralded a change in the style of music the band was playing. As of February 1945 the personnel included Bill Harris, Sonny Berman, Pete Candoli, Billy Bauer (later replaced by Chuck Wayne), Ralph Burns, Davey Tough and Flip Phillips.
In 1944, he joined the Woody Herman band with members Neal Hefti, Bill Harris, Flip Phillips, Chubby Jackson and Dave Tough.

Swing music

swingswing jazzswing band
Its lively, swinging arrangements, combining bop themes with swing rhythm parts, were greatly admired.
Notable musicians of the swing era include Louis Armstrong, Louis Prima, Larry Clinton, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Glenn Miller, Woody Herman, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Harry James, Louis Jordan, and Cab Calloway.

Pete Candoli

Candoli BrothersPeteBrothers Candoli
As of February 1945 the personnel included Bill Harris, Sonny Berman, Pete Candoli, Billy Bauer (later replaced by Chuck Wayne), Ralph Burns, Davey Tough and Flip Phillips.
He played with the big bands of Woody Herman, Stan Kenton, and many others, and worked extensively in the studios of the recording and television industries.

Chuck Wayne

As of February 1945 the personnel included Bill Harris, Sonny Berman, Pete Candoli, Billy Bauer (later replaced by Chuck Wayne), Ralph Burns, Davey Tough and Flip Phillips.
Wayne was a member of Woody Herman's First Herd, the first guitarist in the George Shearing quintet, and Tony Bennett's music director and accompanist.

Dizzy Gillespie

GillespieDizzie GillespieDizzy
Dizzy Gillespie, a trumpeter and one of the originators of bop, wrote three arrangements for Woody Herman, "Woody'n You", "Swing Shift" and "Down Under".
During his time in Calloway's band, Gillespie started writing big band music for Woody Herman and Jimmy Dorsey.

Billy Bauer

As of February 1945 the personnel included Bill Harris, Sonny Berman, Pete Candoli, Billy Bauer (later replaced by Chuck Wayne), Ralph Burns, Davey Tough and Flip Phillips.
He played with the Jerry Wald band and recorded with Carl Hoff and His Orchestra in 1941 before joining Woody Herman in 1944 as a member of the First Herd.

Isham Jones

JonesI. JonesIsham Jones & His Orchestra
Herman also performed with the Harry Sosnick orchestra, Gus Arnheim and Isham Jones.
Noted musicians who played in Jones's band included Louis Panico, Benny Goodman (although no records were made during the short time he was there), Woody Herman, Walt Yoder, and Roy Bargy.

Woody 'n' You

Woody 'n YouWoody'n YouWoody N' You
Dizzy Gillespie, a trumpeter and one of the originators of bop, wrote three arrangements for Woody Herman, "Woody'n You", "Swing Shift" and "Down Under".
"Woody 'n' You", originally "Woody'n You" (also spelled "Woody 'n You" and on Stan Getz album Jazz Giants '58 it is listed as Woodyn' You), pronounced "Wouldn'[t] you," and occasionally named "Algo bueno", is a 1942 jazz standard written by Dizzy Gillespie as an homage to Woody Herman.

Neal Hefti

Neil HeftiHeftiN. Hefti
Neal Hefti and Ralph Burns collaborated on the arrangement of "Caldonia" that the Herman band used.
He became a prominent composer and arranger while playing trumpet for Woody Herman; while working for Herman he provided new arrangements for "Woodchopper's Ball" and "Blowin' Up a Storm" and composed "The Good Earth" and "Wild Root".

Bill Harris (musician)

Bill HarrisBill Harriss
As of February 1945 the personnel included Bill Harris, Sonny Berman, Pete Candoli, Billy Bauer (later replaced by Chuck Wayne), Ralph Burns, Davey Tough and Flip Phillips.
He joined Woody Herman's First Herd in 1944.

The Golden Wedding

"The Golden Wedding" (1941), arranged by James "Jiggs" Noble, was notable for its extended (34 bars) drum solo by Frankie Carlson.
A swing arrangement of the work by James "Jiggs" Noble, recorded in New York City in late 1940 or early 1941 by Woody Herman and his orchestra as "The Golden Wedding", became a 1941 hit and a jazz standard.

Ebony Concerto (Stravinsky)

Ebony Concerto
Along with the high acclaim for their jazz and blues performances, classical composer Igor Stravinsky wrote the Ebony Concerto, one in a series of compositions commissioned by Herman with solo clarinet, for this band.
Igor Stravinsky wrote the Ebony Concerto in 1945 (finishing the score on December 1) for the Woody Herman band known as the First Herd.

Deane Kincaide

Dean KincaidDean Kincaide
Musicians and arrangers that stood out included Cappy Lewis on trumpet and saxophonist/arranger Deane Kincaide.
He joined Bob Crosby's group in 1935, and worked with Woody Herman and Manone again; at the end of the decade he worked briefly with Tommy Dorsey.

Zoot Sims

Jack SimsJohn Haley SimsSims, Zoot
This derives from the song recorded December 27, 1947, for Columbia records, "Four Brothers", written by Jimmy Giuffre, featuring the saxophone section of Zoot Sims, Serge Chaloff, Herbie Steward, and Stan Getz.
He first gained attention in the "Four Brothers" sax section of Woody Herman's big band, afterward enjoying a long solo career, often in partnership with fellow saxmen Gerry Mulligan and Al Cohn, and the trombonist Bob Brookmeyer.

Jimmy Giuffre

Jimmy GuiffreGiuffreJames Rivers
This derives from the song recorded December 27, 1947, for Columbia records, "Four Brothers", written by Jimmy Giuffre, featuring the saxophone section of Zoot Sims, Serge Chaloff, Herbie Steward, and Stan Getz.
He first became known as an arranger for Woody Herman's big band, for which he wrote "Four Brothers" (1947).

Stan Getz

GetzGetz, StanStan Getz Quartet
This derives from the song recorded December 27, 1947, for Columbia records, "Four Brothers", written by Jimmy Giuffre, featuring the saxophone section of Zoot Sims, Serge Chaloff, Herbie Steward, and Stan Getz.
Coming to prominence in the late 1940s with Woody Herman's big band, Getz is described by critic Scott Yanow as "one of the all-time great tenor saxophonists".

Al Cohn

Some of the notable musicians of this band were also Al Cohn, Gene Ammons, Lou Levy, Oscar Pettiford, Terry Gibbs, and Shelly Manne.
He came to prominence in the band of clarinetist Woody Herman and was known for his longtime musical partnership with fellow saxophonist Zoot Sims.

Four Brothers (jazz standard)

Four BrothersFour Brothers" (jazz standard)The Four Brothers
This derives from the song recorded December 27, 1947, for Columbia records, "Four Brothers", written by Jimmy Giuffre, featuring the saxophone section of Zoot Sims, Serge Chaloff, Herbie Steward, and Stan Getz.
Woody Herman recorded it on December 27, 1947 for Columbia records with his second Herd, which had been organized earlier that year.

Lou Levy (pianist)

Lou LevyLou Levy Sextet
Some of the notable musicians of this band were also Al Cohn, Gene Ammons, Lou Levy, Oscar Pettiford, Terry Gibbs, and Shelly Manne.
A professional at age nineteen, Levy played with Georgie Auld (1947 and later), Sarah Vaughan, Chubby Jackson (1947–1948), Boyd Raeburn, Woody Herman's Second Herd (1948–1950), Tommy Dorsey (1950) and Flip Phillips.

DownBeat

Down BeatDownbeat MagazineDown Beat Magazine
In 1946 the band won Down Beat, Metronome, Billboard and Esquire polls for best band, nominated by their peers in the big band business.

Gene Ammons

Some of the notable musicians of this band were also Al Cohn, Gene Ammons, Lou Levy, Oscar Pettiford, Terry Gibbs, and Shelly Manne.
In 1949 Ammons replaced Stan Getz as a member of Woody Herman's Second Herd, and then in 1950 formed a duet with Sonny Stitt.