Woolworth Building

WoolworthWoolworth Building, First Floor InteriorWoolworth tower
The Woolworth Building is an early American skyscraper located at 233 Broadway in Manhattan, New York City.wikipedia
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Cass Gilbert

Designed by architect Cass Gilbert, it was the tallest building in the world from 1913 to 1930, with a height of 792 ft. More than a century after its construction, it remains one of the 100 tallest buildings in the United States as well as one of the 30 tallest buildings in New York City. The Woolworth Building was designed in the neo-Gothic style by the architect Cass Gilbert.
An early proponent of skyscrapers, his works include the Woolworth Building, the United States Supreme Court building, the state capitols of Minnesota, Arkansas and West Virginia; and the Saint Louis Art Museum and Public Library.

Early skyscrapers

skyscraperearly skyscraperfirst skyscraper
The Woolworth Building is an early American skyscraper located at 233 Broadway in Manhattan, New York City.
Iconic buildings such as the Flatiron were followed by the 612 ft tall Singer Tower, the 700 ft Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower and the 792 ft Woolworth Building.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
The Woolworth Building is an early American skyscraper located at 233 Broadway in Manhattan, New York City.
These include the Woolworth Building, an early example of Gothic Revival architecture in skyscraper design, built with massively scaled Gothic detailing; completed in 1913, for 17 years it was the world's tallest building.

List of tallest buildings in New York City

tallest building in New YorkNew York City skylinetallest building in New York City
Designed by architect Cass Gilbert, it was the tallest building in the world from 1913 to 1930, with a height of 792 ft. More than a century after its construction, it remains one of the 100 tallest buildings in the United States as well as one of the 30 tallest buildings in New York City.
During this period 16 skyscrapers over 600 ft were built —including the Woolworth Building, the Bank of Manhattan Trust Building, the Chrysler Building and the Empire State Building, each of which was the tallest in the world at the time of its completion, the last remaining so for forty years.

Gunvald Aus

Gunvald Aus Company
Engineers Gunvald Aus and Kort Berle designed the steel frame, supported on massive caissons that penetrate to the bedrock.
He is most associated with the engineering of the Woolworth Building in New York City.

Chrysler Building

Chrysler405 Lexington AvenueChrysler Building, Ground Floor Interior
It remained the tallest building in the world until the construction of 40 Wall Street and the Chrysler Building, also in New York City, in 1930.
At the new height, Chrysler's building would be taller than the 792 ft Woolworth Building, a building in lower Manhattan that was the world's tallest at the time.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
The Woolworth Building is an early American skyscraper located at 233 Broadway in Manhattan, New York City.
The Woolworth Building, and its distinctive Gothic architecture, took the title in 1913, topping off at 792 ft. Structures such as the Equitable Building of 1915, which rises vertically forty stories from the sidewalk, prompted the passage of the 1916 Zoning Resolution, requiring new buildings to contain setbacks withdrawing progressively at a defined angle from the street as they rose, in order to preserve a view of the sky at street level.

List of tallest buildings in the United States

tallest building in the United Statestallest buildings in the United Statestallest in the United States
Designed by architect Cass Gilbert, it was the tallest building in the world from 1913 to 1930, with a height of 792 ft. More than a century after its construction, it remains one of the 100 tallest buildings in the United States as well as one of the 30 tallest buildings in New York City.

40 Wall Street

Bank of Manhattan Trust BuildingThe Trump BuildingTrump Building
It remained the tallest building in the world until the construction of 40 Wall Street and the Chrysler Building, also in New York City, in 1930.
Shortly after, Ohrstrom modified his project to have 60 floors, but it was still below the 792 ft Woolworth Building and the 808 ft Chrysler Building project, announced in 1928.

C. Paul Jennewein

Carl Paul Jennewein
Two ceiling murals by C. Paul Jennewein, titled Labor and Commerce, are located above the mezzanine where it crosses the south and north wings, respectively.
Much of his early work was as a muralist, including in 1912 four murals for the Woolworth Building; the first building to be called "the Cathedral of Commerce."

Glazed architectural terra-cotta

faienceterra cottaglazed terra cotta
Except for the lowest four floors, the exterior of the Woolworth Building was cast in limestone-colored, glazed architectural terracotta panels.
Buildings incorporating glazed terra-cotta include the Woolworth Building in New York City and the Wrigley Building in Chicago.

Harry Yerkes

The lobby also contains a set of German chimes designed by Harry Yerkes.
He founded the Yerkes Sound-Effects Company, which developed and marketed a pneumatic system to play chimes, featured in the Woolworth Building at time of construction.

Irving Trust

Irving Trust CompanyIrving NationalIrving National Bank
Around the same time, Woolworth's friend Lewis Pierson was having difficulty getting shareholder approval for the merger of his Irving National Bank and the rival New York Exchange Bank.
Between 1913 and 1931, its headquarters was in the Woolworth Building; after 1931, until it was acquired by Bank of New York, its headquarters was located at One Wall Street, at what is now known as the BNY Mellon Building.

90 West Street

90 West Street, New York City
The architect had recently finished designing the nearby Broadway–Chambers Building and 90 West Street, and Woolworth admired the architecture of the latter.
When completed in 1907, the building's Gothic styling and ornamentation served to emphasize its 23-story height, and foreshadowed Gilbert's later work on the Woolworth Building.

Gothic architecture

GothicGothic styleLate Gothic
Given its resemblance to European Gothic cathedrals, the structure was called "The Cathedral of Commerce" by the Reverend S. Parkes Cadman in a booklet of the same title published in 1916.
In the early 20th century, Gothic decorative elements appeared on the towers of the new skyscrapers, notably the Woolworth Building by Cass Gilbert in New York and the Chicago Tribune Building in Chicago, by John Mead Howells and Raymond Hood, symbolizing the role of these buildings as "cathedrals of commerce."

Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place/Cortlandt Street station

Chambers StreetWorld Trade CenterCortlandt Street
The building's Park Place entrance contained a stair to the New York City Subway's Park Place station, served by the, inside the westernmost bay of the building entrance.
A short staircase in that mezzanine once led to an entrance to the lobby of the Woolworth Building.

Lower Manhattan

Downtown ManhattanLowerdowntown
Having received commitment from the banks, Woolworth acquired a corner site on Broadway and Park Place in Lower Manhattan, opposite City Hall.
Throughout the early decades of the 1900s, the area experienced a construction boom, with major towers such as 40 Wall Street, the American International Building, Woolworth Building, and 20 Exchange Place being erected.

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower

Met Life TowerMetLife TowerMetropolitan Life Tower
Even after the revised height was unveiled, Woolworth still yearned to make the building even taller as it was now close to the 700 ft height of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower, the tallest building in New York City and the world at the time.
It was the world's tallest building until 1913, when it was surpassed by the Woolworth Building.

Rubin Schron

Rubie Schron
Around the same time, Witkoff planned to partner with Rubin Schron to create an “office club” on the top 25 floors building to attract high-end tenants like hedge funds and private equity firms.
The portfolio of Cammeby's, which Schron founded in 1967, includes office buildings, market-rate and government-subsidized apartment complexes, nursing homes, the 16-building complex in Sunset Park now known as Industry City, a stake in the bottom half of Woolworth Building and industrial properties scattered across Long Island.

Broadway (Manhattan)

BroadwayGreat White WayCanyon of Heroes
The Woolworth Building is an early American skyscraper located at 233 Broadway in Manhattan, New York City. Having received commitment from the banks, Woolworth acquired a corner site on Broadway and Park Place in Lower Manhattan, opposite City Hall.

Gothic Revival architecture

Gothic RevivalNeo-GothicGothic
The Woolworth Building was designed in the neo-Gothic style by the architect Cass Gilbert.
Some architects persisted in using Neo-Gothic tracery as applied ornamentation to an iron skeleton underneath, for example in Cass Gilbert's 1913 Woolworth Building skyscraper in New York and Raymond Hood's 1922 Tribune Tower in Chicago.

New York City Hall

City HallCity Hall ParkNew York's City Hall
Having received commitment from the banks, Woolworth acquired a corner site on Broadway and Park Place in Lower Manhattan, opposite City Hall.
Architectural landmarks such as St. Paul's Chapel, St. Peters Church, the Woolworth Building, Tweed Courthouse, the Manhattan Municipal Building, the Park Row Building, One Police Plaza, and the Brooklyn Bridge surround City Hall.

City Hall station (BMT Broadway Line)

City HallCity Hall StationBMT Broadway Line
Another entrance led to the City Hall station one block north, now served by the, but this was closed in 1982 due to concerns over crime.
An exit at the south end of the platform led to the Woolworth Building, but this was closed in 1982 due to concerns over crime.

Broadway–Chambers Building

Broadway Chambers Building
The architect had recently finished designing the nearby Broadway–Chambers Building and 90 West Street, and Woolworth admired the architecture of the latter.
Gilbert went on to be one of the pre-eminent architects of his time, designing the Woolworth Building and the United States Supreme Court building, among many others.

A. Hall and Sons Terra Cotta

Atlantic Terra Cotta CompanyAtlanticAtlantic Terra Cotta
The Atlantic Terra Cotta Company provided the original terracotta cladding.
The company, always located at 59 Buckingham Avenue, changed its name to the Perth Amboy Terra Cotta Company and then to Atlantic Terra Cotta which, as the preeminent terra cotta producer in the United States, went on to produce in its kilns the terra cotta for such notable buildings as the United States Supreme Court, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Woolworth Building.