Word

wordsverballexicalword boundaryword boundariesword breaksstemlexicallytermlexical items
In linguistics, a word is the smallest element that can be uttered in isolation with objective or practical meaning.wikipedia
543 Related Articles

Semantics

semanticsemanticallymeaning
In linguistics, a word is the smallest element that can be uttered in isolation with objective or practical meaning.
It is concerned with the relationship between signifiers—like words, phrases, signs, and symbols—and what they stand for, their denotation.

Morpheme

morphemesmorphemicmonomorphemic
This contrasts deeply with a morpheme, which is the smallest unit of meaning but will not necessarily stand on its own.
A morpheme is not identical to a word, and the principal difference between the two is that a morpheme may or may not stand alone, whereas a word, by definition, is freestanding.

Root (linguistics)

rootrootsroot word
A word may consist of a single morpheme (for example: oh!, rock, red, quick, run, expect), or several (rocks, redness, quickly, running, unexpected), whereas a morpheme may not be able to stand on its own as a word (in the words just mentioned, these are -s, -ness, -ly, -ing, un-, -ed).A complex word will typically include a root and one or more affixes (rock-s, red-ness, quick-ly, run-ning, un-expect-ed), or more than one root in a compound (black-board, sand-box). Words can be put together to build larger elements of language, such as phrases (a red rock, put up with), clauses (I threw a rock), and sentences (He threw a rock too, but he missed).
The root word is the primary lexical unit of a word, and of a word family (this root is then called the base word), which carries the most significant aspects of semantic content and cannot be reduced into smaller constituents.

Dictionary

dictionariesonline dictionaryMajor English dictionaries
Dictionaries categorize a language's lexicon (i.e., its vocabulary) into lemmas.
A dictionary, sometimes known as a wordbook, is a collection of words in one or more specific languages, often arranged alphabetically (or by radical and stroke for ideographic languages), which may include information on definitions, usage, etymologies, pronunciations, translation, etc. or a book of words in one language with their equivalents in another, sometimes known as a lexicon.

Sentence (linguistics)

sentencesentencesdeclarative sentence
A word may consist of a single morpheme (for example: oh!, rock, red, quick, run, expect), or several (rocks, redness, quickly, running, unexpected), whereas a morpheme may not be able to stand on its own as a word (in the words just mentioned, these are -s, -ness, -ly, -ing, un-, -ed).A complex word will typically include a root and one or more affixes (rock-s, red-ness, quick-ly, run-ning, un-expect-ed), or more than one root in a compound (black-board, sand-box). Words can be put together to build larger elements of language, such as phrases (a red rock, put up with), clauses (I threw a rock), and sentences (He threw a rock too, but he missed).
In non-functional linguistics, a sentence is a textual unit consisting of one or more words that are grammatically linked.

Lemma (morphology)

lemmacitation formdictionary form
Dictionaries categorize a language's lexicon (i.e., its vocabulary) into lemmas.
In morphology and lexicography, a lemma (plural lemmas or lemmata) is the canonical form, dictionary form, or citation form of a set of words (headword).

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
In linguistics, a word is the smallest element that can be uttered in isolation with objective or practical meaning.
The lexicon consists of words and bound morphemes, which are parts of words that can't stand alone, like affixes.

Lexeme

lexemeslexicallexical root
This correlates phonemes (units of sound) to lexemes (units of meaning).
Put more technically, a lexeme is an abstract unit of morphological analysis in linguistics, that roughly corresponds to a set of forms taken by a single word.

Compound (linguistics)

compoundcompound wordcompounds
A word may consist of a single morpheme (for example: oh!, rock, red, quick, run, expect), or several (rocks, redness, quickly, running, unexpected), whereas a morpheme may not be able to stand on its own as a word (in the words just mentioned, these are -s, -ness, -ly, -ing, un-, -ed).A complex word will typically include a root and one or more affixes (rock-s, red-ness, quick-ly, run-ning, un-expect-ed), or more than one root in a compound (black-board, sand-box). Words can be put together to build larger elements of language, such as phrases (a red rock, put up with), clauses (I threw a rock), and sentences (He threw a rock too, but he missed).
In linguistics, a compound is a lexeme (less precisely, a word) that consists of more than one stem.

Orthography

orthographicorthographiesorthographically
In languages with a literary tradition, there is interrelation between orthography and the question of what is considered a single word.
It includes norms of spelling, hyphenation, capitalization, word breaks, emphasis, and punctuation.

Analytic language

analyticanalyticalanalyticity
Mandarin Chinese is a very analytic language (with few inflectional affixes), making it unnecessary to delimit words orthographically.
Typically, analytic languages have a low morpheme-per-word ratio, especially with respect to inflectional morphemes.

Synthetic language

syntheticsyntheticallysynthetic languages
In synthetic languages, a single word stem (for example, love) may have a number of different forms (for example, loves, loving, and loved). However, for some purposes these are not usually considered to be different words, but rather different forms of the same word.
In linguistic typology, a synthetic language is a language with a high morpheme-per-word ratio, as opposed to a low morpheme-per-word ratio in what is described as an analytic language.

Word stem

stemstemsverb stem
In synthetic languages, a single word stem (for example, love) may have a number of different forms (for example, loves, loving, and loved). However, for some purposes these are not usually considered to be different words, but rather different forms of the same word.
In linguistics, a stem is a part of a word.

Grammar

grammaticalgrammaticallyrules of language
Grammar classifies a language's lexicon into several groups of words.
In linguistics, grammar (from Greek: γραμματική) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language.

Verb

verbsv.action verb
The basic bipartite division possible for virtually every natural language is that of nouns vs. verbs. The classification into such classes is in the tradition of Dionysius Thrax, who distinguished eight categories: noun, verb, adjective, pronoun, preposition, adverb, conjunction and interjection.
A verb, from the Latin verbum meaning word, is a word (part of speech) that in syntax conveys an action (bring, read, walk, run, learn), an occurrence (happen, become), or a state of being (be, exist, stand).

Noun

nounssubstantiveabstract noun
The basic bipartite division possible for virtually every natural language is that of nouns vs. verbs. The classification into such classes is in the tradition of Dionysius Thrax, who distinguished eight categories: noun, verb, adjective, pronoun, preposition, adverb, conjunction and interjection.
A noun (from Latin nōmen, literally meaning "name") is a word that functions as the name of some specific thing or set of things, such as living creatures, objects, places, actions, qualities, states of existence, or ideas.

Language

languageslinguistichuman language
A word may consist of a single morpheme (for example: oh!, rock, red, quick, run, expect), or several (rocks, redness, quickly, running, unexpected), whereas a morpheme may not be able to stand on its own as a word (in the words just mentioned, these are -s, -ness, -ly, -ing, un-, -ed).A complex word will typically include a root and one or more affixes (rock-s, red-ness, quick-ly, run-ning, un-expect-ed), or more than one root in a compound (black-board, sand-box). Words can be put together to build larger elements of language, such as phrases (a red rock, put up with), clauses (I threw a rock), and sentences (He threw a rock too, but he missed).
If they are free to be moved around within an utterance, they are usually called words, and if they are bound to other words or morphemes, they are called affixes.

Conjunction (grammar)

conjunctionconjunctionscoordinating conjunction
The classification into such classes is in the tradition of Dionysius Thrax, who distinguished eight categories: noun, verb, adjective, pronoun, preposition, adverb, conjunction and interjection.
In grammar, a conjunction (abbreviated or ) is a part of speech that connects words, phrases, or clauses that are called the conjuncts of the conjoining construction.

Grammatical gender

genderfemininemasculine
4) The neuter gender nominative or accusative singular suffix .
A classifier, or measure word, is a word or morpheme used in some languages together with a noun, principally to enable numbers and certain other determiners to be applied to the noun.

Acronym

initialismacronymsinitials
An acronym is a word or name formed as an abbreviation from the initial components of a phrase or a word, usually individual letters (as in NATO or laser) and sometimes syllables (as in Benelux).

Ki Tissa

Exodus 33Ki TisaParashat Ki Tissa
Ki Tisa, Ki Tissa, Ki Thissa, or Ki Sisa ( — Hebrew for "when you take," the sixth and seventh words, and first distinctive words in the parashah) is the 21st weekly Torah portion (, parashah) in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading and the ninth in the Book of Exodus.

List of English words without rhymes

English words without rhymesobscure perfect rhymeswords with no rhymes
The following is a list of English words without rhymes, called refractory rhymes—that is, a list of words in the English language which rhyme with no other English word.

Beshalach

BeshallaḥParashat BeshallachB'Shallach
Beshalach, Beshallach, or Beshalah ( — Hebrew for "when [he] let go," the second word and first distinctive word in the parashah) is the sixteenth weekly Torah portion (, parashah) in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading and the fourth in the Book of Exodus.

Hybrid word

hybridhybrid termjoins two diverse roots
A hybrid word or hybridism is a word that etymologically derives from at least two languages.

Password

passwordswatchwordcomputer passwords
A password is a word or string of characters used for user authentication to prove identity or access approval to gain access to a resource (example: an access code is a type of password), which is to be kept secret from those not allowed access.