WorldWideWeb

webfirst Web browserNexus (web browser)WWW
WorldWideWeb (later renamed to Nexus to avoid confusion between the software and the World Wide Web) was the first web browser and editor.wikipedia
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World Wide Web

WebWWWthe web
WorldWideWeb (later renamed to Nexus to avoid confusion between the software and the World Wide Web) was the first web browser and editor.
By Christmas 1990, Berners-Lee had built all the tools necessary for a working Web: the first web browser (WorldWideWeb, which was a web editor as well) and the first web server.

Web browser

browserweb browsersinternet browser
WorldWideWeb (later renamed to Nexus to avoid confusion between the software and the World Wide Web) was the first web browser and editor.
The first web browser, called WorldWideWeb, was created in 1990 by Sir Tim Berners-Lee.

Line Mode Browser

Line-mode browserwww
By this time, several others, including Bernd Pollermann, Robert Cailliau, Jean-François Groff, and visiting undergraduate student Nicola Pellow – who wrote the Line Mode Browser – were involved in the project.
In 1990, Tim Berners-Lee had already written the first browser, WorldWideWeb (later renamed to Nexus), but that program only worked on the proprietary software of NeXT computers, which were in limited use.

Tim Berners-Lee

Sir Tim Berners-LeeTim Berners LeeTimothy Berners-Lee
Some of the code still resides on Tim Berners-Lee's NeXT Computer in the CERN museum and has not been recovered due to the computer's status as a historical artifact.
His software also functioned as an editor (called WorldWideWeb, running on the NeXTSTEP operating system), and the first Web server, CERN HTTPd (short for Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon).

NeXT Computer

NeXTNeXT Computer SystemNeXT Inc.
Some of the code still resides on Tim Berners-Lee's NeXT Computer in the CERN museum and has not been recovered due to the computer's status as a historical artifact. Berners-Lee wrote what would become known as WorldWideWeb on a NeXT Computer during the second half of 1990, while working for CERN, a European nuclear research agency.
A NeXT Computer and its object oriented development tools and libraries were used by Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau at CERN to develop the world's first web server (CERN httpd) and web browser (WorldWideWeb).

Mosaic (web browser)

MosaicNCSA MosaicMosaic web browser
They were all eclipsed by Mosaic in terms of popularity, which by 1993 had replaced the WorldWideWeb program.
While often described as the first graphical web browser, Mosaic was preceded by WorldWideWeb, the lesser-known Erwise and ViolaWWW.

Libwww

W3 common access library
Berners-Lee and Groff later adapted many of WorldWideWeb's components into a C programming language version, creating the libwww API.
In 1991 and 1992, Tim Berners-Lee and a student at CERN named Jean-François Groff rewrote various components of the original WorldWideWeb browser for the NeXTstep operating system in portable C code, in order to demonstrate the potential of the World Wide Web.

Nicola Pellow

By this time, several others, including Bernd Pollermann, Robert Cailliau, Jean-François Groff, and visiting undergraduate student Nicola Pellow – who wrote the Line Mode Browser – were involved in the project.
Almost immediately after Berners-Lee completed the WorldWideWeb web browser for the NeXT platform, Pellow was tasked with creating a browser, after a quick lesson in C programming.

History of the World Wide Web

growth of the World Wide WebWorld Wide WebFirst International Conference
By Christmas 1990, Berners-Lee had built all the tools necessary for a working Web: the HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) 0.9, the HyperText Markup Language (HTML), the first Web browser (named WorldWideWeb, which was also a Web editor), the first HTTP server software (later known as CERN httpd), the first web server (http://info.cern.ch), and the first Web pages that described the project itself.

NeXTSTEP

NeXTNeXT DPSNeXTStep 1.0
The first web browser, WorldWideWeb, and the first-ever app store were all invented on the NeXTSTEP platform.

Software

Computer softwareSoftware & Programmingsoftware technology
WorldWideWeb (later renamed to Nexus to avoid confusion between the software and the World Wide Web) was the first web browser and editor.

WYSIWYG

What you see is what you getwhat-you-see-is-what-you-getWYSIWYG editor
At the time it was written, it was the sole web browser in existence, as well as the first WYSIWYG HTML editor.

HTML editor

Web design programweb editorHTML editors
WorldWideWeb (later renamed to Nexus to avoid confusion between the software and the World Wide Web) was the first web browser and editor. At the time it was written, it was the sole web browser in existence, as well as the first WYSIWYG HTML editor.

Source code

codesourcesource file
The source code was released into the public domain on April 30, 1993.

Public domain

public domain resourcepublic-domainPD
The source code was released into the public domain on April 30, 1993.

Code

encodingencodedencode
Some of the code still resides on Tim Berners-Lee's NeXT Computer in the CERN museum and has not been recovered due to the computer's status as a historical artifact.

Microcosm (CERN)

MicrocosmMicrocosm museumCERN
Some of the code still resides on Tim Berners-Lee's NeXT Computer in the CERN museum and has not been recovered due to the computer's status as a historical artifact.

Computer hardware

hardwarepersonal computer hardwaredevice
To coincide with the 20th anniversary of the research center giving the web to the world, a project began in 2013 at CERN to preserve this original hardware and software associated with the birth of the Web.

CERN

European Organization for Nuclear ResearchEuropean Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)European Laboratory for Particle Physics
Berners-Lee wrote what would become known as WorldWideWeb on a NeXT Computer during the second half of 1990, while working for CERN, a European nuclear research agency.

Robert Cailliau

By this time, several others, including Bernd Pollermann, Robert Cailliau, Jean-François Groff, and visiting undergraduate student Nicola Pellow – who wrote the Line Mode Browser – were involved in the project.

Porting

portedportports
The team created so called "passive browsers" which do not have the ability to edit because it was hard to port this feature from the NeXT system to other operating systems.

Operating system

operating systemsOScomputer operating system
The team created so called "passive browsers" which do not have the ability to edit because it was hard to port this feature from the NeXT system to other operating systems.

X Window System

X11XX Window
Porting to the X Window System (X) was not possible as nobody on the team had experience with X.

C (programming language)

CC programming languageC language
Berners-Lee and Groff later adapted many of WorldWideWeb's components into a C programming language version, creating the libwww API.

Application programming interface

APIAPIsapplication programming interfaces
Berners-Lee and Groff later adapted many of WorldWideWeb's components into a C programming language version, creating the libwww API.