Wormleighton Manor

Wormleighton
Wormleighton Manor is a manor house in the civil parish of Wormleighton in the historic county of Warwickshire, England.wikipedia
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Spencer family

SpencerSpencer-ChurchillSpencers
It belonged to the wealthy Spencer family during the 16th and 17th century. The wealthy Spencer family, who built their fortune on the production of wool in Warwickshire in the 15th century, first became linked to Wormleighton in 1469, when John Spencer became feoffee (feudal lord) and a tenant at Althorp in 1486.
A close relative of Henry Spencer (died c. 1478) was John Spencer, who in 1469 had become feoffee (trustee) of Wormleighton in Warwickshire and a tenant at Althorp in Northamptonshire in 1486.

Althorp

Althorp HouseAlthorp ParkAlthorp, Northamptonshire
Much of the house was burned down by Royalists during the English Civil War in 1645 and abandoned by the Spencers in favour of Althorp, which contains some materials salvaged from Wormleighton to this day. The wealthy Spencer family, who built their fortune on the production of wool in Warwickshire in the 15th century, first became linked to Wormleighton in 1469, when John Spencer became feoffee (feudal lord) and a tenant at Althorp in 1486.
In 1469 John Spencer's uncle – also named John Spencer – had become feoffee (feudal lord) of Wormleighton in Warwickshire and a tenant at Althorp in Northamptonshire in 1486.

Wormleighton

Wormleighton Manor is a manor house in the civil parish of Wormleighton in the historic county of Warwickshire, England.
The village was abandoned after the English Civil War when the Spencer family home Wormleighton Manor was burned down in 1645.

John Spencer (died 1522)

John SpencerSir John Spencer
As the family wealth grew dramatically, John Spencer purchased the land at Althorp between 1509 and 1511 and constructed another residence there.
In 1469, John Spencer's uncle – another John Spencer – had become feoffee (feudal lord) of Wormleighton in Warwickshire and a tenant at Althorp in Northamptonshire in 1486.

Virginia House

The eastern wing of Virginia House, completed in 1929, is said to be based on the design of Wormleighton Manor.
The east wing of the house, however, is based on Wormleighton Manor, a Spencer-Churchill family estate in England.

Henry G. Morse

Henry Grant Morse
In 1925, Americans Alexander and Virginia Weddell visited the property with architect Henry Grant Morse to get some inspiration on architectural features they could incorporate into a Tudor manor and former priory they had recently bought from Lloyds Bank in Warwickshire and had shipped to Richmond, Virginia.
Morse was hired in 1925 to visit England and study other manors, travelling around the English countryside and surveying properties such as Wormleighton Manor, fusing together different ideas into the final reconstruction in Virginia.

Manor house

manorhousemanorfortified manor house
Wormleighton Manor is a manor house in the civil parish of Wormleighton in the historic county of Warwickshire, England.

Warwickshire

County of WarwickWarwickshire, EnglandWarwick
Wormleighton Manor is a manor house in the civil parish of Wormleighton in the historic county of Warwickshire, England.

English Civil War

Civil WarCivil WarsEnglish Revolution
Much of the house was burned down by Royalists during the English Civil War in 1645 and abandoned by the Spencers in favour of Althorp, which contains some materials salvaged from Wormleighton to this day.

Listed building

Grade II listedlistedGrade II* listed
Today, all that is left of the manor, which was once four times the size of Althorp, is the Wormleighton Manor Gatehouse and Tower Cottage which is a Grade II listed building and the northern range of the manor. It is of two storeys, built of yellow ashlar and is listed as a Grade II listed building.

Tudor architecture

TudorTudor styleTudor-style
Wormleighton manor is a fine example of the Tudor architecture that appeared during the reign of Henry VIII.

Henry VIII of England

Henry VIIIKing Henry VIIIKing Henry VIII of England
Wormleighton manor is a fine example of the Tudor architecture that appeared during the reign of Henry VIII.

Feoffee

feoffeesenfeofffeoffee to uses
The wealthy Spencer family, who built their fortune on the production of wool in Warwickshire in the 15th century, first became linked to Wormleighton in 1469, when John Spencer became feoffee (feudal lord) and a tenant at Althorp in 1486.

Banbury

Banbury, OxfordshireBanburyshireBanbury Cross
In 1645, Royalist forces from nearby Banbury set fire to Wormleighton Manor to prevent it becoming a parliamentary stronghold, causing extensive damage.

Lloyds Bank

Lloyds TSBLloydsLloyd's Bank
In 1925, Americans Alexander and Virginia Weddell visited the property with architect Henry Grant Morse to get some inspiration on architectural features they could incorporate into a Tudor manor and former priory they had recently bought from Lloyds Bank in Warwickshire and had shipped to Richmond, Virginia.

Richmond, Virginia

RichmondRichmond, VARichmond City
In 1925, Americans Alexander and Virginia Weddell visited the property with architect Henry Grant Morse to get some inspiration on architectural features they could incorporate into a Tudor manor and former priory they had recently bought from Lloyds Bank in Warwickshire and had shipped to Richmond, Virginia.

Great chamber

chamberpalace chamber
The remaining wing seems to have consisted of two great chambers one above the other, one about 40 ft long, and two others west of them, at least 27 ft in length.

Gable

gabled roofgabledgable end
The westernmost is made one of two stones with two gables and was built later, while the other two bays, roughly 70 ft long, have the original 16th-century buttresses and are each about 15 ft in height.

Scullery

dish washing roomsculleriesScullery (room)
The chamber is now used as a scullery and its south wall was a stone fireplace which is now mostly destroyed.

Ashlar

cut stoneashlarsdressings
It is of two storeys, built of yellow ashlar and is listed as a Grade II listed building.

Sundial

sundialssun dialsun clock
The archways are 11 ft high and on the south have aged marigold central carvings and a sundial.

John Spencer (sheriff)

Sir John SpencerJohn SpencerSir John Spencer of Althorp
Spencer was the son of Sir William Spencer of Wormleighton Manor, Warwickshire, and Althorp, Northamptonshire, and his wife Susan Knightley, daughter of Sir Richard Knightley of Fawsley, Northamptonshire.

Duke of Marlborough (title)

Duke of MarlboroughDukes of MarlboroughDukedom of Marlborough
After his older brother's death in 1729, Charles Spencer had already inherited the Spencer family estates and the titles of Earl of Sunderland (1643) and Baron Spencer of Wormleighton (1603), all in the Peerage of England.

Earl of Sunderland

Baron Spencer (1603)Earl of Sunderland (1643)Baron Spencer
1522) who acquired the Wormleighton estate in Warwickshire and the Althorp estate in Northamptonshire.

Great Brington

St Mary the VirginBringtonSt Mary the Virgin Church, Great Brington
In 1508, John Spencer from Wormleighton in Warwickshire purchased the estate of Althorp outside Great Brington with its moated house and several hundred acres of farmland.