Wren

Troglodytidaewrenstrue wrensApolinar's wrenbirdfairy wrensJenny wrenlilac-crowned wrenThe Wrenwrens of the Americas and Eurasia
Wrens are a family of mostly small, brown, passerine birds in the (mainly) New World family Troglodytidae.wikipedia
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Eurasian wren

wrenwrensTroglodytes troglodytes
Only the Eurasian wren occurs in the Old World, where in Anglophone regions, it is commonly known simply as the "wren", as it is the originator of the name. As suggested by its name, the Eurasian wren is the only species of wren found outside the Americas, as restricted to Europe, Asia, and northern Africa (it was formerly considered conspecific with the winter wren and Pacific wren of North America).
The Eurasian wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) is a very small bird, and the only member of the wren family Troglodytidae found in Eurasia and Africa (Maghreb).

Campylorhynchus

Notable exceptions are the relatively large members of the genus Campylorhynchus, which can be quite bold in their behavior.
Campylorhynchus is a genus of wrens, which has at least 15 described species.

Australasian wren

Maluridaefairy-wrensfairy-wren
The name wren has been applied to other, unrelated birds, particularly the New Zealand wrens (Acanthisittidae) and the Australian wrens (Maluridae). The 27 Australasian "wren" species in the family Maluridae are unrelated, as are the New Zealand wrens in the family Acanthisittidae, the antbirds in the family Thamnophilidae, and the Old World babbler of the family Timaliidae.
While commonly known as wrens, they are unrelated to the true wrens.

Wren (disambiguation)

other families
The name "wren" is also ascribed to other families of passerine birds throughout the world.
Wrens are passerine birds in the mainly New World family Troglodytidae.

Antbird

Thamnophilidaeantbird familyantbirds
The 27 Australasian "wren" species in the family Maluridae are unrelated, as are the New Zealand wrens in the family Acanthisittidae, the antbirds in the family Thamnophilidae, and the Old World babbler of the family Timaliidae.
Despite some species' common names, this family is not closely related to the wrens, vireos or shrikes.

New Zealand wren

AcanthisittidaeAcanthisittiacanthisittids
The name wren has been applied to other, unrelated birds, particularly the New Zealand wrens (Acanthisittidae) and the Australian wrens (Maluridae). The 27 Australasian "wren" species in the family Maluridae are unrelated, as are the New Zealand wrens in the family Acanthisittidae, the antbirds in the family Thamnophilidae, and the Old World babbler of the family Timaliidae.
They are called "wrens" due to similarities in appearance and behaviour to the true wrens (Troglodytidae), but are not members of that family.

Musician wren

Cyphorhinus aradaCyphorhinus aradusuirapuru
The song of members of the genera Cyphorhinus and Microcerculus have been considered especially pleasant to the human ear, leading to common names such as song wren, musician wren, flutist wren, and southern nightingale-wren.
The musician wren or organ wren (Cyphorhinus arada) is a species of wren named for its elaborate song.

Passerine

Passeriformespasserinesperching bird
Wrens are a family of mostly small, brown, passerine birds in the (mainly) New World family Troglodytidae.
For example, the wrens of the Americas and Eurasia; those of Australia; and those of New Zealand look superficially similar and behave in similar ways, and yet belong to three far-flung branches of the passerine family tree; they are as unrelated as it is possible to be while remaining Passeriformes.

Microcerculus

Nightingale wren
The song of members of the genera Cyphorhinus and Microcerculus have been considered especially pleasant to the human ear, leading to common names such as song wren, musician wren, flutist wren, and southern nightingale-wren.
Microcerculus is a genus of birds in the wren family Troglodytidae that are endemic to Central America and tropical regions of South America.

Southern nightingale-wren

Scaly-breasted wrenMicrocerculus marginatus
The song of members of the genera Cyphorhinus and Microcerculus have been considered especially pleasant to the human ear, leading to common names such as song wren, musician wren, flutist wren, and southern nightingale-wren.
The southern nightingale-wren (Microcerculus marginatus), also known as the scaly-breasted wren, is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae.

Giant wren

Campylorhynchus chiapensis
They range in size from the white-bellied wren, which averages under 10 cm and 9 g, to the giant wren, which averages about 22 cm and weighs almost 50 g. The dominating colors of their plumage are generally drab, composed of gray, brown, black, and white, and most species show some barring, especially to tail and/or wings. Many species also take vegetable matter such as seeds and berries, some (primarily the larger species) take small frogs and lizards; the Eurasian wren has been recorded wading into shallow water to catch small fish and tadpoles; Sumichrast's wren and the Zapata wren take snails; and the giant wren and marsh wren have been recorded attacking and eating bird eggs (in the latter species, even eggs of conspecifics).
The giant wren (Campylorhynchus chiapensis) is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae.

Cobb's wren

The insular species include the Clarión wren and Socorro wren from the Revillagigedo Islands in the Pacific Ocean, and Cobb's wren in the Falkland Islands, but few Caribbean islands have a species of wren, with only the southern house wren in the Lesser Antilles, the Cozumel wren of Cozumel Island, and the highly restricted Zapata wren in a single swamp in Cuba.
Cobb's wren (Troglodytes cobbi) is a fairly small (12-13.5 cm) wren which is endemic to the Falkland Islands.

House wren

Troglodytes aedonCozumel wrenhouse wren (''Troglodytes aedon'')
The insular species include the Clarión wren and Socorro wren from the Revillagigedo Islands in the Pacific Ocean, and Cobb's wren in the Falkland Islands, but few Caribbean islands have a species of wren, with only the southern house wren in the Lesser Antilles, the Cozumel wren of Cozumel Island, and the highly restricted Zapata wren in a single swamp in Cuba.
The house wren (Troglodytes aedon) is a very small songbird of the wren family, Troglodytidae.

Song wren

Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus
The song of members of the genera Cyphorhinus and Microcerculus have been considered especially pleasant to the human ear, leading to common names such as song wren, musician wren, flutist wren, and southern nightingale-wren.
The song wren (Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus) is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae.

Socorro wren

SocorroThryomanes sissonii
The insular species include the Clarión wren and Socorro wren from the Revillagigedo Islands in the Pacific Ocean, and Cobb's wren in the Falkland Islands, but few Caribbean islands have a species of wren, with only the southern house wren in the Lesser Antilles, the Cozumel wren of Cozumel Island, and the highly restricted Zapata wren in a single swamp in Cuba.
The Socorro wren (Troglodytes sissonii) is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae.

Winter wren

Troglodytes hiemaliswren
As suggested by its name, the Eurasian wren is the only species of wren found outside the Americas, as restricted to Europe, Asia, and northern Africa (it was formerly considered conspecific with the winter wren and Pacific wren of North America).
The winter wren (Troglodytes hiemalis) is a very small North American bird and a member of the mainly New World wren family Troglodytidae.

Pacific wren

Troglodytes pacificus
As suggested by its name, the Eurasian wren is the only species of wren found outside the Americas, as restricted to Europe, Asia, and northern Africa (it was formerly considered conspecific with the winter wren and Pacific wren of North America).
The Pacific wren (Troglodytes pacificus) is a very small North American bird and a member of the mainly New World wren family Troglodytidae.

Flutist wren

Microcerculus ustulatus
The song of members of the genera Cyphorhinus and Microcerculus have been considered especially pleasant to the human ear, leading to common names such as song wren, musician wren, flutist wren, and southern nightingale-wren.
The flutist wren (Microcerculus ustulatus) is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae.

Clarión wren

Clarion wrenTroglodytes tanneri
The insular species include the Clarión wren and Socorro wren from the Revillagigedo Islands in the Pacific Ocean, and Cobb's wren in the Falkland Islands, but few Caribbean islands have a species of wren, with only the southern house wren in the Lesser Antilles, the Cozumel wren of Cozumel Island, and the highly restricted Zapata wren in a single swamp in Cuba.
The Clarión wren (Troglodytes tanneri) is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae.

Cyphorhinus

The song of members of the genera Cyphorhinus and Microcerculus have been considered especially pleasant to the human ear, leading to common names such as song wren, musician wren, flutist wren, and southern nightingale-wren.

Marsh wren

Cistothorus palustrisLong-billed marsh wren
Many species also take vegetable matter such as seeds and berries, some (primarily the larger species) take small frogs and lizards; the Eurasian wren has been recorded wading into shallow water to catch small fish and tadpoles; Sumichrast's wren and the Zapata wren take snails; and the giant wren and marsh wren have been recorded attacking and eating bird eggs (in the latter species, even eggs of conspecifics).
The marsh wren (Cistothorus palustris) is a small North American songbird of the wren family.

Bicolored wren

Campylorhynchus griseus
A local Spanish name for the giant wren and bicolored wren is chupahuevo ("egg-sucker"), but whether the latter actually eats eggs is unclear.
The bicolored wren (Campylorhynchus griseus) is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae.

Sumichrast's wren

Hylorchilus sumichrastislender-billed wren
Many species also take vegetable matter such as seeds and berries, some (primarily the larger species) take small frogs and lizards; the Eurasian wren has been recorded wading into shallow water to catch small fish and tadpoles; Sumichrast's wren and the Zapata wren take snails; and the giant wren and marsh wren have been recorded attacking and eating bird eggs (in the latter species, even eggs of conspecifics).
The Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti), or the slender-billed wren is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae.

Cactus wren

Campylorhynchus brunneicapilluscactus wrens
The cactus wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) is a species of wren that is endemic to parts of the southwestern United States and northern and central Mexico.

Wing-banded wren

Microcerculus bambla
The wing-banded wren (Microcerculus bambla) is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae.