Wrocław

BreslauBreslau (Wrocław)WroclawWrocław, PolandBreslau (as Wrocław was known at that time)Breslau (as Wrocław was then known)Wrocław (Breslau)Breslau (today Wrocław)Breslau, GermanyBreslau, Germany (now Wrocław, Poland)
Wrocław ( (English: ); Breslau ; Vratislav; Vratislavia) is a city in western Poland and the largest city in the historical region of Silesia.wikipedia
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Poland

🇵🇱PolishPOL
Wrocław ( (English: ); Breslau ; Vratislav; Vratislavia) is a city in western Poland and the largest city in the historical region of Silesia.
Other major cities include Kraków, Łódź, Wrocław, Poznań, Gdańsk, and Szczecin.

Silesia

ŚląskSilesianSchlesien
Wrocław ( (English: ); Breslau ; Vratislav; Vratislavia) is a city in western Poland and the largest city in the historical region of Silesia.
Silesia's largest city and historical capital is Wrocław.

Lower Silesian Voivodeship

Lower SilesiaLower Silesiandolnośląskie
Today, it is the capital of the Lower Silesian Voivodeship.
Both texts can be seen in Wrocław.

Lower Silesia

LowerDuchies of Lower SilesiaLow Silesia
Wrocław is the historical capital of Silesia and Lower Silesia.
Lower Silesia is located mostly in the basin of the middle Oder River with its historic capital in Wrocław.

World Team Olympiad

World Olympiad Teams ChampionshipWorld Open Team OlympiadWorld Olympiad Seniors Teams Championship
Also in this year, Wrocław hosted the Theatre Olympics, World Bridge Games and the European Film Awards.
In 2016, the events were run separately, as the World Bridge Games, in Wrocław, Poland.

List of people from Wrocław

Vratislavians
Persons born or living in the city are known as "Vratislavians" (wrocławianie).
This list includes people who were born in or lived in Wrocław after 1945.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Wrocław

Diocese of WrocławWrocławBishop of Wrocław
The city's name was first recorded as "Wrotizlava" in the chronicle of German chronicler Thietmar of Merseburg, which mentions it as a seat of a newly installed bishopric in the context of the Congress of Gniezno. One of the most important events during this period was the foundation of the Diocese of Wrocław by the Polish Duke (from 1025 King) Bolesław the Brave in 1000.
The Archdiocese of Wrocław (Archidiecezja wrocławska; Erzbistum Breslau; Arcidiecéze vratislavská; Archidioecesis Vratislaviensis) is a Latin Rite archdiocese of the Catholic Church named after its capital Wrocław in Poland.

Ostrów Tumski, Wrocław

Ostrów TumskiCathedral Islandcentral island
A Slavic tribe Ślężans settled on the Oder and erected on Ostrów Tumski a gord.
Ostrów Tumski ("Cathedral Island", Dominsel) is the oldest part of the city of Wrocław in south-western Poland.

Henry II the Pious

Henry IIHenry II, High Duke of PolandDuke Henry II the Pious
During the battles with the Mongols the Wrocław Castle was defended by Henry II the Pious and was never captured.
Henry II the Pious (Henryk II Pobożny) (1196 – 9 April 1241), of the Silesian line of the Piast dynasty was Duke of Silesia at Wrocław and Duke of Kraków and thus High Duke of all Poland as well as Duke of Southern Greater Poland from 1238 until his death.

Henry VI the Good

Heinrich VI of BreslauHenryHenry IX ''the Good
Wrocław, which for 350 years belonged to the Polish, after the death of Henry VI the Good in 1335 was incorporated into the Kingdom of Bohemia, then a part of the Holy Roman Empire.
Henry VI the Good (also known as of Wrocław) (Henryk VI Dobry or Wrocławski) (18 March 1294 – 24 November 1335) was a Duke of Wrocław since 1296 (with his brothers as co-rulers until 1311).

Battle of Hundsfeld

Psie PoleBattle of Psie Pole
In 1109 during the Polish-German war, Prince Bolesław III Wrymouth defeated the King of Germany Henry V at the Battle of Hundsfeld, stopping the German march into Poland.
The Battle of Hundsfeld or Battle of Psie Pole was allegedly fought on 24 August 1109 near the Silesian capital Wrocław between the Holy Roman Empire in aid of the claims of the exiled Piast duke Zbigniew against his ruling half-brother, Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland.

Bolesław I the Brave

Bolesław IBolesław I the Brave, Duke of PolandBoleslaw I
One of the most important events during this period was the foundation of the Diocese of Wrocław by the Polish Duke (from 1025 King) Bolesław the Brave in 1000.
Following the Congress of Gniezno, bishoprics were also established in Kraków, Wrocław and Kołobrzeg, and Bolesław formally repudiated paying tribute to the Holy Roman Empire.

Kraków

CracowKrakauKrakow
The medieval chronicle, Gesta principum Polonorum, written by Gallus Anonymus in 1112–1116 AD, named Wrocław, along with Kraków and Sandomierz, as one of the three capitals of the Polish Kingdom.
It was rebuilt practically identical, based on new location act and incorporated in 1257 by the high duke Bolesław V the Chaste who following the example of Wrocław, introduced city rights modelled on the Magdeburg law allowing for tax benefits and new trade privileges for the citizens.

Piotr Włostowic

Peter WlastPero Vlast (Piotr Włostowic)Piotr Dunin
By 1139, a settlement belonging to Governor Piotr Włostowic (a.k.a. Piotr Włast Dunin) was built, and another was founded on the left bank of the River Oder, near the present seat of the University.
undefined 1080 – 1153), also known as Peter Wlast or Włost) was a Polish noble, castellan of Wrocław, and a ruler (możnowładca) of part of Silesia.

Silesians (tribe)

ŚlężanieSilesiansSleenzane (Slenzans; Ślężanie)
A Slavic tribe Ślężans settled on the Oder and erected on Ostrów Tumski a gord.
Silesians (Ślężanie) were a tribe of West Slavs, specifically of the Lechitic/Polish group, inhabiting territories of Lower Silesia, near Ślęża mountain and Ślęza river, on the both banks of the Oder, up to the area of modern city of Wrocław.

Sandomierz

SandomirDuke of SandomierzSandomierski
The medieval chronicle, Gesta principum Polonorum, written by Gallus Anonymus in 1112–1116 AD, named Wrocław, along with Kraków and Sandomierz, as one of the three capitals of the Polish Kingdom.
The first known historical mention of the city comes from the early 12th-century, when the chronicler Gallus Anonymus ranked it together with Kraków and Wrocław as one of the main cities of Poland.

Treaty of Breslau

BreslauPeace of Breslauannexation
Habsburg empress Maria Theresa ceded the territory in the Treaty of Breslau in 1742.
The Treaty of Breslau was a preliminary peace agreement signed on 11 June 1742 following long negotiations at the Silesian capital Wrocław (Breslau) by emissaries of Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria and King Frederick II of Prussia ending the First Silesian War.

Wrocław University of Science and Technology

Technical University of WrocławTechnische HochschuleWrocław
Important landmarks were inaugurated in 1910, the Kaiser bridge and the Technical University, which now houses the Wrocław University of Technology.
Wrocław University of Science and Technology (Politechnika Wrocławska, founded as Technische Hochschule Breslau) is a technological university in Wrocław Poland.

Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau

Jewish Theological SeminaryBreslauJewish Seminary
On 10 October 1854, the Jewish Theological Seminary opened.
Das Jüdisch-Theologische Seminar (Fränckelsche Stiftung), The Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau was an institution in Breslau for the training of rabbis, founded under the will of Jonas Fränckel, and opened in 1854.

Bolesław III Wrymouth

Boleslaus IIIBolesław IIIBolesław III of Poland
In 1109 during the Polish-German war, Prince Bolesław III Wrymouth defeated the King of Germany Henry V at the Battle of Hundsfeld, stopping the German march into Poland.
Władysław also retained control of the most important cities i.e. Wrocław, Kraków and Sandomierz.

Centennial Hall

Hala LudowaHala StuleciaWroclaw Centennial Hall
In 1913, the newly built Centennial Hall housed an exhibition commemorating the 100th anniversary of the historical German Wars of Liberation against Napoleon and the first award of the Iron Cross.
The Centennial Hall (Hala Stulecia; formerly Hala Ludowa, People's Hall, Jahrhunderthalle) is a historic building in Wrocław, Poland.

Wyspa Piasek

The city became a commercial centre and expanded to Wyspa Piasek (Sand Island), and then to the left bank of the River Oder.
Wyspa Piasek (English: Sand Island) in Wrocław, one of several islands in the Odra river within old town and Śródmiejski Węzeł Wodny (Downtown Water Junction).

Frankfurt (Oder)

Frankfurt an der OderFrankfurtFrankfurt/Oder
The Protestant Viadrina European University of Frankfurt (Oder) was relocated to Breslau in 1811, and united with the local Jesuit University to create the new Silesian Frederick-William University (Schlesische Friedrich-Wilhelm-Universität, now University of Wrocław).
In the late Middle Ages, the town dominated the river trade between Wrocław and Szczecin.

War of the Austrian Succession

Austrian SuccessionAustrianAustrian Successions
The Kingdom of Prussia annexed the town and most of Silesia during the War of the Austrian Succession in the 1740s.
As a result, the Austrians had fewer than 3,000 troops available to defend Silesia, and although this was increased to 7,000 shortly before the Prussian attack, they could only hold the fortresses of Glogau, Breslau, and Brieg, abandoning the rest of the province and retreating into Moravia, at which point both sides went into winter quarters.

Breslau-Dürrgoy concentration camp

Dürrgoy
KZ Dürrgoy, one of the first concentration camps in the Third Reich, was set up in Breslau in 1933.
Breslau-Dürrgoy concentration camp or KZ Dürrgoy was a short-lived Nazi German concentration camp set up in the southern part of Wrocław (Breslau), then in Germany, before World War II on the grounds of the old fertilizer factory "Silesia".