Wyllis Cooper

Wyllis Oswald Cooper (January 26, 1899 – June 22, 1955) was an American writer and producer.wikipedia
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Lights Out (radio show)

Lights OutChicken HeartLights Out'' (1946 TV series)
He is best remembered for creating and writing the old time radio programs Lights Out (1934–1947) and Quiet, Please (1947–1949) In 1934, he created his best known dramatic series, a late night horror radio program called Lights Out, which he also directed.
Created by Wyllis Cooper and then eventually taken over by Arch Oboler, versions of Lights Out aired on different networks, at various times, from January 3, 1934 to the summer of 1947 and the series eventually made the transition to television.

Quiet, Please

Quiet PleaseQuiet, Please!
He is best remembered for creating and writing the old time radio programs Lights Out (1934–1947) and Quiet, Please (1947–1949) In 1944, Cooper joined the radio department of New York's Compton Advertising, Inc. In 1947, he created what was arguably his finest radio effort, Quiet, Please, which began over the Mutual Broadcasting System network but which later moved to ABC.
Quiet, Please! was a radio fantasy and horror program created by Wyllis Cooper, also known for creating Lights Out.

Golden Age of Radio

old-time radioradioold time radio
He is best remembered for creating and writing the old time radio programs Lights Out (1934–1947) and Quiet, Please (1947–1949)
Leading writers who created original material for radio included Norman Corwin, Carlton E. Morse, David Goodis, Archibald MacLeish, Arthur Miller, Arch Oboler, Wyllis Cooper, Rod Serling, Jay Bennett, and Irwin Shaw.

Pekin, Illinois

PekinPekin High School ChinksPékin
Born Willis Oswald Cooper in Pekin, Illinois, he attended Pekin High School, graduating in 1916.
Wyllis Cooper (1899–1955), writer for radio

Arch Oboler

Free World Theatre
Arch Oboler, who took over the writing of Lights Out when Cooper left, would suggest that Cooper was the first person to create a unique form of radio drama, writing, "Radio drama (as distinguished from theatre plays boiled down to kilocycle size) began at midnight, in the middle thirties, on one of the upper NBC floors of Chicago's Merchandise Mart. The pappy was a rotund writer by the name of Willys (sic) Cooper."
Wyllis Cooper created Lights Out in 1934.

Radio drama

drama CDradio playaudio drama
Arch Oboler, who took over the writing of Lights Out when Cooper left, would suggest that Cooper was the first person to create a unique form of radio drama, writing, "Radio drama (as distinguished from theatre plays boiled down to kilocycle size) began at midnight, in the middle thirties, on one of the upper NBC floors of Chicago's Merchandise Mart. The pappy was a rotund writer by the name of Willys (sic) Cooper."
In 1951, American writer and producer Arch Oboler suggested that Wyllis Cooper's Lights Out (1934–47) was the first true radio drama to make use of the unique qualities of radio:

Empire Builders (radio program)

Empire Builders
By the late 1920s he was writing advertising copy in Chicago and entered radio, writing scripts for the 1929-1931 NBC radio program Empire Builders.
Wyllis Cooper was continuity editor.

Son of Frankenstein

the son of
He wrote the screenplay for the 1939 film Son of Frankenstein (which introduced the character of "Ygor") and contributed to a few of the Mr. Moto films.

Mutual Broadcasting System

MutualMutual RadioMutual Network
In 1944, Cooper joined the radio department of New York's Compton Advertising, Inc. In 1947, he created what was arguably his finest radio effort, Quiet, Please, which began over the Mutual Broadcasting System network but which later moved to ABC.
The network gave an outlet to radio dramatist Wyllis Cooper and his highly regarded suspense anthology Quiet, Please, which ran on Mutual from June 1947 to September 1948.

Crime Museum

Scotland Yard Museum of Crime
Hosted by Chief Superintendent John Davidson, fictional curator of the Black Museum at Scotland Yard, it featured an allegedly all-British cast and told stories inspired by artifacts held by the famous London crime museum.
The American radio writer Wyllis Cooper also wrote and directed a similar anthology for NBC that ran at the same time in the U. S. called Whitehall 1212, for the telephone number of Scotland Yard, the program debuted on 18 November 1951, and was hosted by Chief Superintendent John Davidson, curator of the Black Museum.

Hollywood Hotel (radio program)

Hollywood HotelHollywood Hotel radio program
At the same time, he continued to provide radio scripts for various series including Hollywood Hotel.

Whitehall 1212 (radio show)

Whitehall 1212
He also wrote and directed a crime anthology for NBC called Whitehall 1212 that debuted on November 18, 1951.
Whitehall 1212, named after the then famous telephone number of Scotland Yard—the headquarters of the London Metropolitan Police Force—was written and directed by Wyllis Cooper and broadcast by NBC.

Glen Gardner, New Jersey

Glen GardnerGlen Gardner BoroughBorough of Glen Gardner
Cooper resided in Glen Gardner, New Jersey, and died in High Bridge, New Jersey, on June 22, 1955.
Wyllis Cooper (1899–1955), radio writer.

United States Cavalry

CavalryU.S. CavalryCavalry Branch
He soon joined the U.S. Cavalry where, achieving the rank of Sergeant, he spent time on the Mexican border.

Mexico

🇲🇽MexicanMéxico
He soon joined the U.S. Cavalry where, achieving the rank of Sergeant, he spent time on the Mexican border.

Signal Corps (United States Army)

Signal CorpsU.S. Army Signal CorpsArmy Signal Corps
In 1917, he became a part of the Signal Corps and was sent to France during World War I.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarFirst
In 1917, he became a part of the Signal Corps and was sent to France during World War I.

Meuse-Argonne Offensive

Meuse-ArgonneArgonneBattle of the Argonne Forest
While in France he was gassed at the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
By the late 1920s he was writing advertising copy in Chicago and entered radio, writing scripts for the 1929-1931 NBC radio program Empire Builders.

Radio program

radio showradio programmeradio shows
In 1934, he created his best known dramatic series, a late night horror radio program called Lights Out, which he also directed.

Hollywood

Hollywood, CaliforniaHollywood, CAHollywood, Los Angeles, California
The show would prove to be a long-term success, but in 1936, Cooper capitalized on the fame of Lights Out and resigned from NBC, moving to Hollywood, California, where he worked as a screenwriter for various film studios.

Igor (character)

IgorYgorFamous Assistant to Dr. Frankensomething
He wrote the screenplay for the 1939 film Son of Frankenstein (which introduced the character of "Ygor") and contributed to a few of the Mr. Moto films.

Mr. Moto

Mr. I. A. MotoMr. Kentaro MotoRight You Are, Mr. Moto
He wrote the screenplay for the 1939 film Son of Frankenstein (which introduced the character of "Ygor") and contributed to a few of the Mr. Moto films.

Theatre

theaterstagetheatrical
Arch Oboler, who took over the writing of Lights Out when Cooper left, would suggest that Cooper was the first person to create a unique form of radio drama, writing, "Radio drama (as distinguished from theatre plays boiled down to kilocycle size) began at midnight, in the middle thirties, on one of the upper NBC floors of Chicago's Merchandise Mart. The pappy was a rotund writer by the name of Willys (sic) Cooper."

Merchandise Mart

NeoConNeoCon World's Trade FairMerchandise Mart Properties
Arch Oboler, who took over the writing of Lights Out when Cooper left, would suggest that Cooper was the first person to create a unique form of radio drama, writing, "Radio drama (as distinguished from theatre plays boiled down to kilocycle size) began at midnight, in the middle thirties, on one of the upper NBC floors of Chicago's Merchandise Mart. The pappy was a rotund writer by the name of Willys (sic) Cooper."