A report on Wyoming

The first Fort Laramie as it looked before 1840 (painting from memory by Alfred Jacob Miller)
A backcountry road in the Sierra Madre Range of southeastern Wyoming, near Bridger Peak
Köppen climate types of Wyoming, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
On Interstate 80, leaving Utah
Autumn in the Bighorn Mountains
Teton Range
Green River valley
An enlargeable map of the 23 counties of Wyoming
Since 2016, Wyoming license plates feature Squaretop Mountain in the background
Cheyenne, Wyoming
Casper, Wyoming
Rock Springs, Wyoming
Evanston, Wyoming
Rawlins, Wyoming
Wyoming is home to 12 ski resorts, including Grand Targhee and Jackson Hole.
Wind farm in Uinta County
North Antelope Rochelle Mine, the largest estimated coal mine reserve in the world, as of 2013
A natural gas rig west of the Wind River Range
Major highways of Wyoming
Wind River Canyon
Wyoming terrain map
National Park Service sites map
The largest population centers are Cheyenne (southeast) and Casper.
Wyoming State Capitol building, Cheyenne
State flower of Wyoming: Indian paintbrush
The Rocky Mountain Herbarium at the University of Wyoming
Yellowstone National Park
Devils Tower National Monument
Thunder Basin National Grassland
Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

- Wyoming

173 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Montana

27 links

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

Early Indian treaty territories in Montana
Assiniboine family, Montana, 1890–91
Montana Territory in 1865
Chief Joseph and Col. John Gibbon met again on the Big Hole Battlefield site in 1889.
Buffalo Soldiers, Ft. Keogh, Montana, 1890. The nickname was given to the "Black Cavalry" by the Native American tribes they fought.
Mennonite family in Montana, c. 1937
Map of Montana
Relief map of Montana
Saint Mary Lake in Glacier National Park
Belly River in Waterton Lakes National Park
Missouri Breaks region in central Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument
Quake Lake was created by a landslide during the 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake.
Temperature and precipitation for Montana's capital city, Helena
Köppen climate types of Montana, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Clark Fork River, Missoula, in autumn
Missoula, the second-largest city in Montana
Montana population density map
Population of Montana 1870–2018
Indian reservations in Montana. Borders are not exact.
Montana ranks 2nd nationally in craft breweries per capita.
First Interstate Center, in downtown Billings, is the tallest building in Montana.
Dancers at Crow Fair in 1941
Montana State Bobcats football at Bobcat Stadium (Montana State University), Bozeman
Lone Mountain at Big Sky Ski Resort
The Big Sky Resort
The Palisades area on the north end of the ski area at Red Lodge Mountain Resort
Guided snowmobile tours in Yellowstone Park
Yellowstone Airport, West Yellowstone, Montana
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election

It is bordered by Idaho to the west; North Dakota and South Dakota to the east; Wyoming to the south; and by the Canadian provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, and Saskatchewan to the north.

Utah

18 links

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

Map showing Utah in 1838 when it was part of Mexico, Britannica 7th edition
Brigham Young led the first Mormon pioneers to the Great Salt Lake.
A sketch of Salt Lake City in 1860
Deseret Village recreates Utah pioneer life for tourists.
The Golden Spike where the First Transcontinental Railroad was completed in the U.S. on May 10, 1869, in Promontory, Utah
Children reading in Santa Clara, Utah, in 1940
Utah county boundaries
Köppen climate types of Utah, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Snow in Rose Park, Salt Lake City
The Rocky Mountain elk is the Utah state mammal.
The California gull is the Utah state bird.
Western black widow spider
Pando, considered one of the heaviest and oldest organisms on Earth.
Joshua trees, yuccas, and cholla cactus occupy the far southwest corner of the state in the Mojave Desert
"Welcome to Utah" sign
Utah population density map
The LDS Salt Lake Temple, the primary attraction in the city's Temple Square
First Presbyterian Church in Salt Lake City
Sri Sri Radha Krishna (Hindu) Temple
The Wasatch Front region has seen large growth and development despite the economic downturn. Shown is the City Creek Center project, a development in downtown Salt Lake City with a price tag of $1.5–2.5 billion.
One out of every 14 flash memory chips in the world is produced in Lehi, Utah.
Zion National Park in southern Utah is one of five national parks in the state.
Farms and ranches
Bryce Canyon National Park Amphitheater (winter view)
Mining has been a large industry in Utah since it was first settled. The Bingham Canyon Mine in Salt Lake County is one of the largest open pit mines in the world.
Salt Lake International Airport is the largest airport in Utah
FrontRunner commuter rail serves select cities from Ogden to Provo via Salt Lake City.
TRAX light rail serves Salt Lake County
Jake Garn (top-right), former Senator of Utah (1974–1993), and astronaut on Space Shuttle flight STS-51-D
The Utah State Capitol, Salt Lake City
The Scott Matheson Courthouse is the seat of the Utah Supreme Court.
The Huntsman Cancer Institute on the campus of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City
The Eyring Science Center on the campus of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah
The Utah Jazz playing against the Houston Rockets
Robbie Russell playing for Real Salt Lake
Arches National Park
Pariette Wetlands
Little Cottonwood Canyon
Deer Creek Reservoir
American Fork Canyon
Kolob Canyons at Zion National Park
Salt Lake City
Logan
thumb|Ogden
Park City
Provo
Sandy
St. George
Layton
Monument Valley in southeastern Utah. This area was used to film many Hollywood Westerns.
The otherworldly look of the Bonneville Salt Flats has been used in many movies and commercials.

Utah is a landlocked U.S. state bordered to its east by Colorado, to its northeast by Wyoming, to its north by Idaho, to its south by Arizona, and to its west by Nevada.

Colorado

17 links

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

Ruins of Cliff Palace at Mesa Verde National Park. Photo by Gustaf Nordenskiöld, 1891
Great Kiva at Chimney Rock in the San Juan Mountains of Southwestern Colorado. It is said to have been built by the Ancient Pueblo peoples.
The Spanish discovering the Colorado River, namesake of the state, in 1540, by Augusto Ferrer-Dalmau. García López de Cárdenas can be seen overlooking the Grand Canyon.
Map of the Mexican Cession, with the white representing the territory the United States received from Mexico (plus land ceded to the Republic of Texas) after the Mexican–American War. Well over half of Colorado was received during this treaty.
The Anasazi Heritage Center in Dolores
The territories of New Mexico, Utah, Kansas, and Nebraska before the creation of the Territory of Colorado
Mount of the Holy Cross, photographed by William Henry Jackson in 1874
The Georgetown Loop of the Colorado Central Railroad as photographed by William Henry Jackson in 1899
Three 10th Mountain Division skitroopers above Camp Hale in February 1944.
The arid high plains in Southeastern Colorado
Front Range Peaks west of Denver
Tenmile Range and Dillon Reservoir near Breckenridge
Grays Peak at 4352 m is the highest point on the Continental Divide in North America
The high desert lands that make up the San Luis Valley in Southern Colorado
Maroon Bells, at 14163 ft, is part of White River National Forest and a tourist destination
The Colorado National Monument near Grand Junction is made up of high desert canyons and sandstone rock formations
Köppen climate types of Colorado, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Breckenridge naturalist Edwin Carter with a mounted gray wolf killed in the Colorado Rockies, ca. 1890–1900.
An enlargeable map of the 64 counties of the State of Colorado
An enlargeable map of the 17 core-based statistical areas of Colorado
Colorado population density map
Denver Energy Center lies in the Denver financial district along 17th Street, known as the Wall Street of the West
Corn growing in Larimer County
An oil well in western Colorado
History Colorado Center in Denver
Street art in Denver
The Colorado Rockies baseball club at Coors Field
Empower Field at Mile High in Denver, home field of the Denver Broncos and the Denver Outlaws
Ball Arena, home of the Denver Nuggets, the Colorado Avalanche, and the Colorado Mammoth
Dick's Sporting Goods Park, home of the Colorado Rapids
A Colorado state welcome sign
The main terminal of Denver International Airport evokes the peaks of the Front Range.
The westbound and eastbound California Zephyrs meet in the Glenwood Canyon.
Colorado Christian University
Colorado College
Colorado Mesa University
Colorado School of Mines
Colorado State University
Regis University
The United States Air Force Academy
The University of Colorado Boulder
The University of Denver
Fort Carson
Peterson Space Force Base
United States Air Force Academy
The Southern Ute Tribal Administration Building
The Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Office Complex
Lowry Pueblo in Canyons of the Ancients National Monument
Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve
Spruce Tree House in Mesa Verde National Park

Colorado is bordered by Wyoming to the north, Nebraska to the northeast, Kansas to the east, Oklahoma to the southeast, New Mexico to the south, and Utah to the west, as well as touching Arizona to the southwest at the Four Corners.

South Dakota

16 links

U.S. state in the North Central region of the United States.

U.S. state in the North Central region of the United States.

Deadwood, like many other Black Hills towns, was founded after the discovery of gold.
A harvest in South Dakota, 1898
A South Dakota farm during the Dust Bowl, 1936. Normal tilling practices turn South Dakota's fragile soil into a fine, loose powder that blows away, and sometimes covered vehicles, equipment, and buildings with dust during the Dust Bowl.
Terrain and primary geographic features of South Dakota
Badlands National Park
The Black Hills, a low mountain range, is located in Southwestern South Dakota.
Much of western South Dakota is covered by buttes.
Köppen climate types in South Dakota
Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills
South Dakota population density map
Indian reservations in South Dakota
East Side Lutheran Church, Sioux Falls
A B-1B Lancer lifts off from Ellsworth Air Force Base, one of South Dakota's largest employers
Ethanol plant in Turner County
Beaver Creek Bridge in Wind Cave National Park
The South Dakota State Capitol in Pierre
Congressional delegation in 2015: (from left) Senator Mike Rounds, Senator John Thune, and Representative Kristi Noem.
Nicholas Black Elk with his family, circa 1910
Sioux Falls, with a population of around 180,000, is the largest city in South Dakota.
The Coughlin Campanile, a landmark on the campus of South Dakota State University in Brookings
A tunnel along the George S. Mickelson Trail in the Black Hills

South Dakota is bordered by the states of North Dakota (to the north), Minnesota (to the east), Iowa (to the southeast), Nebraska (to the south), Wyoming (to the west), and Montana (to the northwest).

Detailed pictorial map from 1904

Yellowstone National Park

16 links

Detailed pictorial map from 1904
Ferdinand V. Hayden (1829–1887), American geologist who convinced Congress to make Yellowstone a national park in 1872
Ferdinand V. Hayden's map of Yellowstone National Park, 1871
Portrait of Nathaniel P. Langford (1870), the first superintendent of the park
Great Falls of the Yellowstone, U.S. Geological and Geographic Survey of the Territories (1874–1879), photographer William Henry Jackson
Fort Yellowstone (circa 1910), formerly a U.S. Army post, now serves as park headquarters.
Superintendent Horace M. Albright and black bears (1922). Tourists often fed black bears in the park's early years, with 527 injuries reported from 1931 to 1939.
The Roosevelt Arch in Gardiner, Montana, at the north entrance
Pictorial map by Heinrich C. Berann (1991); scale exaggerated
Official park map c. undefined 2006 (click on map to enlarge)
Satellite image of Yellowstone National Park in 2020
Columnar basalt near Tower Fall; large floods of basalt and other lava types preceded mega-eruptions of superheated ash and pumice.
Boardwalks allow visitors to safely approach the thermal features, such as Grand Prismatic Spring.
Infrastructure damage at Hebgen Lake due to the 7.2 magnitude earthquake of 1959
Meadow in Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone sand verbena are endemic to Yellowstone's lakeshores.
American bison
Elk mother nursing her calf
A reintroduced wolf in Yellowstone National Park
Black bear and cub near Tower Fall
Elk in Hayden Valley
Pronghorn are commonly found on the grasslands in the park.
Fire in Yellowstone National Park
Wildfire in Yellowstone National Park produces a pyrocumulus cloud.
A crown fire approaches the Old Faithful complex on September 7, 1988.
Winter scene in Yellowstone
Geyser at Yellowstone Lake
Union Pacific Railroad brochure promoting travel to the park (1921)
Tourists watch Old Faithful erupt, 2019.
Vintage photo of human-habituated bears seeking food from visitors
Idaho portion of park highlighted in southwest corner (click to enlarge)
Official park map c. undefined 2020 (click on map to enlarge)

Yellowstone National Park is an American national park located in the western United States, largely in the northwest corner of Wyoming and extending into Montana and Idaho.

Route of the Lewis and Clark expedition

Oregon Trail

17 links

2170 mi east–west, large-wheeled wagon route and emigrant trail in the United States that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon.

2170 mi east–west, large-wheeled wagon route and emigrant trail in the United States that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon.

Route of the Lewis and Clark expedition
U.S. territorial acquisitionsportions of each territory were granted statehood since the 18th century.
The first Fort Laramie as it looked prior to 1840. Painting from memory by Alfred Jacob Miller
Breaking up Camp at Sunrise, by Alfred Jacob Miller
HBC's York Factory Express trade route, 1820s to 1840s. Modern political boundaries shown.
The Oregon Country/Columbia District stretched from 42'N to 54 40'N. The most heavily disputed portion is highlighted.
Trail ruts near Guernsey, Wyoming
Our Camp, by Alfred Jacob Miller
The exploration of the West by Jedediah Smith
Map of the Green River watershed
A wagon lashed to a raft for the last stage of the emigration.
The Central Route in Nevada
Covered wagon replica and Mission Monument at the Whitman Mission National Historic Site about ten miles west of Walla Walla, Washington
Oregon Trail pioneer Ezra Meeker erected this boulder near Pacific Springs on Wyoming's South Pass in 1906.
A bison bull on a Nebraska wildlife refuge
Chimney Rock, Nebraska
Map showing the Platte River watershed, including the North Platte and South Platte tributaries
Independence Rock
Prairie Scene: Mirage, by Alfred Jacob Miller
Storm: Waiting for the Caravan, by Alfred Jacob Miller
Goodale's Cutoff of the Oregon Trail at Lava Lake, west of Arco, ID and east of Carey, ID along US 26, 20, 93. Picture of current two track along section of the cutoff of the Oregon Trail.
View across top of Shoshone Falls, Snake River, Idaho (Timothy H. O'Sullivan, 1874)
One of Boise's 21 Oregon Trail monuments.
Present-day footpaths following ruts of the Oregon Trail near the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center east of Baker City, Oregon
Oregon Trail, painting by Albert Bierstadt, c. 1863
Oregon Trail reenactment at Scotts Bluff

The eastern part of the Oregon Trail spanned part of what is now the state of Kansas and nearly all of what are now the states of Nebraska and Wyoming.

The summits of the Teton Range in Wyoming

Rocky Mountains

16 links

The Rocky Mountains, also known as the Rockies, are a major mountain range and the largest mountain system in North America.

The Rocky Mountains, also known as the Rockies, are a major mountain range and the largest mountain system in North America.

The summits of the Teton Range in Wyoming
Mount Robson in British Columbia
Glaciers, such as Jackson Glacier in Glacier National Park, Montana, as shown here, have dramatically shaped the Rocky Mountains.
Tilted slabs of sedimentary rock in Roxborough State Park near Denver
Great Sand Dunes of Colorado
Bighorn sheep (such as this lamb in Alberta) have declined dramatically since European-American settlement of the mountains
Mesa Verde ruins in Colorado
Cherokee Trail near Fort Collins, Colorado, from a sketch taken June 7, 1859
Sir Alexander MacKenzie in 1800
Aspen, Colorado silver mining in 1898
The Saltair Pavilion on the Great Salt Lake in 1900
Drilling rig for natural gas near the Wind River Range
Castle Geyser in Yellowstone National Park
Icefields Parkway

Of the 100 highest major peaks of the Rocky Mountains, 78 (including the 30 highest) are located in Colorado, ten in Wyoming, six in New Mexico, three in Montana, and one each in Utah, British Columbia, and Idaho.

Nebraska

13 links

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

Nebraska in 1718, Guillaume de L'Isle map, with the approximate area of the future state highlighted
Homesteaders in central Nebraska in 1888
A map of Nebraska
Nebraska National Forest
Köppen climate types of Nebraska, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Winter at Scotts Bluff National Monument
238x238px
317x317px
Nebraska grain bins and elevator
A cropduster in agrarian Nebraska, far west of Omaha
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The Nebraska State Capitol in Lincoln
Football game at the University of Nebraska on September6, 2008

It is bordered by South Dakota to the north; Iowa to the east and Missouri to the southeast, both across the Missouri River; Kansas to the south; Colorado to the southwest; and Wyoming to the west.

A Shoshone encampment in Wyoming, photographed by W. H. Jackson, 1870

Grand Teton National Park

11 links

A Shoshone encampment in Wyoming, photographed by W. H. Jackson, 1870
The enigmatic Colter Stone, with the inscription "John Colter", was found in a field in eastern Idaho in 1931.
"The Three Tetons" as seen from west of the Teton Range by members of the Hayden Geological Survey of 1872. One of the earliest photographs of the Teton Range taken by William Henry Jackson in 1872.
Grand Teton National Park Dedication in 1929
In this image taken by William O. Owen in 1898, his climbing partners John Shive, Franklin Spalding, and Frank Petersen are depicted on top of Grand Teton.
Sunset over the Tetons
Map of Grand Teton National Park Also see resolution adjustable pdf map
Fault-block mountain formation of the Teton Range and Jackson Hole
The Teton Fault near the base of Rockchuck Peak creates a nearly horizontal line above the trees in the foreground.
Oxbow Bend on the Snake River
Middle Teton Glacier on the northeast slopes of Middle Teton has numerous crevasses.
The geologic feature known as the Black Dike is a diabase intrusion into older gneiss and is visible on the east face of Middle Teton as a dark line bisecting the peak.
Low larkspur is one of over a hundred flower species found in the park.
Whitebark pine cones protect seeds that are an important food source.
A forest fire near Beaver Creek
Mount Moran at 12,605 Ft. Elevation
Hiker crosses snowfield en route to Paintbrush Divide.
Boats anchored at the Colter Bay Marina
Left to right, Nez Perce, Grand Teton and Mount Owen in the winter
Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center in Moose, Wyoming
Signal Mountain Lodge
Though cougars are present in Grand Teton, they are rarely seen.
Moose near Leigh Lake
Snake River fine-spotted cutthroat trout has tiny black spots over most of its body.
Bison grazing in Jackson Hole

Grand Teton National Park is an American national park in northwestern Wyoming.

Pauline Small on horseback. She carries the flag of the Crow Tribe of Montana. As a tribal official, she is entitled to carry the flag during the Crow Fair parade.

Crow people

10 links

Apsáalooke, also spelled Absaroka, are Native Americans living primarily in southern Montana.

Apsáalooke, also spelled Absaroka, are Native Americans living primarily in southern Montana.

Pauline Small on horseback. She carries the flag of the Crow Tribe of Montana. As a tribal official, she is entitled to carry the flag during the Crow Fair parade.
Crow Indians, c. 1878–1883
Landscape on the Crow Indian Reservation, Montana
Ledger drawing of a Cheyenne war chief and warriors (left) coming to a truce with a Crow war chief and warriors (right)
A scout on a horse, 1908 by Edward S. Curtis
Crow Indian territory (areas 517, 619 and 635) as described in Fort Laramie treaty (1851), present Montana and Wyoming
"Eight Crow prisoners under guard at Crow agency, Montana, 1887"
The trading posts built for trade with the Crows
De Smet map of the 1851 Fort Laramie Indian territories (the light area). Jesuit missionary De Smet drew this map with the tribal borders agreed upon at Fort Laramie in 1851. Although the map itself is wrong in certain ways, it has the Crow territory west of the Sioux territory as written in the treaty, and the Bighorn area as the heart of the Crow country.
Crow Indian Chief Big Shadow (Big Robber), signer of the Fort Laramie treaty (1851). Painting by Jesuit missionary De Smet.
Lone Dog's Sioux winter count, 1870. Thirty Crows killed in battle.
Crooks army before battle of the Rosebud. The Crow and Shoshone scouts and the Army are crossing Goose River on the way to the Rosebud in 1876. The equestrian woman may be either the Crow berdache Finds-them-and-kills-them or the Crow amazon The-other-magpie.
Buffalo Jump
The Oath Apsaroke by Edward S. Curtis depicting Crow men giving a symbolic oath with a bison meat offering on an arrow
Crow Lodge of Twenty-five Buffalo Skins, 1832–33 by George Catlin
Crow men trading on horseback
Three Crow men on their horses, Edward S. Curtis, 1908
Crow flag seen from Interstate 90 at the Crow Indian Reservation, Big Horn County, Montana
Crow Tribal Chairperson Carl Venne and Barack Obama on the Crow Indian Reservation in Montana on 19 May 2008. Obama was the first presidential candidate to visit the Crow Tribe.
Delegation of important Crow chiefs, 1880. From left to right: Old Crow, Medicine Crow, Long Elk, Plenty Coups, and Pretty Eagle.
Painting of Holds The Enemy, a Crow warrior with split horn headdress and beaded wool leggings by E. A. Burbank
Hó-ra-tó-a, a Crow warrior with headdress, bison robe, and hair reaching the ground. Painted by George Catlin, Fort Union 1832.
Crow moccasins
Crow moccasins, {{circa|1940}}

In historical times, the Crow lived in the Yellowstone River valley, which extends from present-day Wyoming, through Montana and into North Dakota, where it joins the Missouri River.