Xamarin

Xamarin StudioRoboVMXamarin MobileXamarin.Forms
Xamarin is a Microsoft-owned San Francisco-based software company founded in May 2011 by the engineers that created Mono, Xamarin.Android (formerly Mono for Android) and Xamarin.iOS (formerly MonoTouch), which are cross-platform implementations of the Common Language Infrastructure (CLI) and Common Language Specifications (often called Microsoft .NET).wikipedia
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Mono (software)

MonoMonoTouchMono Framework
Xamarin is a Microsoft-owned San Francisco-based software company founded in May 2011 by the engineers that created Mono, Xamarin.Android (formerly Mono for Android) and Xamarin.iOS (formerly MonoTouch), which are cross-platform implementations of the Common Language Infrastructure (CLI) and Common Language Specifications (often called Microsoft .NET). As a part of the acquisition they would also relicense Mono completely under the MIT License and would release all other Xamarin SDK software through the .NET Foundation also under the MIT License.
Originally by Ximian, it was later acquired by Novell, and is now being led by Xamarin, a subsidiary of Microsoft and the .NET Foundation.

Cross-platform software

Cross-platformPlatform independentmulti-platform
Xamarin is a Microsoft-owned San Francisco-based software company founded in May 2011 by the engineers that created Mono, Xamarin.Android (formerly Mono for Android) and Xamarin.iOS (formerly MonoTouch), which are cross-platform implementations of the Common Language Infrastructure (CLI) and Common Language Specifications (often called Microsoft .NET).
Cross-platform frameworks (such as Qt, Flutter, NativeScript, Xamarin, Phonegap, Ionic, and React Native) exist to aid cross-platform development.

Miguel de Icaza

Miguel de '''Icaza
In 1999 Miguel de Icaza and Nat Friedman launched what would eventually be known as Ximian to support and develop software for de Icaza's nascent GNOME project.
Miguel de Icaza (born November 23, 1972) is a Mexican-American programmer, best known for starting the GNOME, Mono, and Xamarin projects.

C Sharp (programming language)

C#Visual C#C# programming language
With a C#-shared codebase, developers can use Xamarin tools to write native Android, iOS, and Windows apps with native user interfaces and share code across multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux.

Common Language Infrastructure

CLICommon Language SpecificationECMA-335
Xamarin is a Microsoft-owned San Francisco-based software company founded in May 2011 by the engineers that created Mono, Xamarin.Android (formerly Mono for Android) and Xamarin.iOS (formerly MonoTouch), which are cross-platform implementations of the Common Language Infrastructure (CLI) and Common Language Specifications (often called Microsoft .NET).

.NET Framework

.NETMicrosoft .NET FrameworkMicrosoft .NET
After Microsoft first announced their .NET Framework in June 2000, de Icaza began investigating whether a Linux version was feasible.
These developments followed the acquisition of Xamarin, which began in February 2016 and was finished on March 18, 2016.

List of mergers and acquisitions by Microsoft

acquiredacquireGreenfield Online
On February 24, 2016, Microsoft announced it had signed a definitive agreement to acquire Xamarin.

Ximian

Helix Code
In 1999 Miguel de Icaza and Nat Friedman launched what would eventually be known as Ximian to support and develop software for de Icaza's nascent GNOME project.
He and Friedman then founded Xamarin on 16 May 2011, a new company to continue the development of Mono.

Nat Friedman

In 1999 Miguel de Icaza and Nat Friedman launched what would eventually be known as Ximian to support and develop software for de Icaza's nascent GNOME project.
In May 2011, Friedman and de Icaza together founded Xamarin, and Friedman was made CEO.

.NET Foundation

As a part of the acquisition they would also relicense Mono completely under the MIT License and would release all other Xamarin SDK software through the .NET Foundation also under the MIT License.
Xamarin contributed six of its projects including the open source email libraries MimeKit and MailKit.

Microsoft Visual Studio

Visual StudioVisual Studio 2005Visual Studio 2008
The release included two main components: Xamarin Studio, a re-branding of its open-source IDE Monodevelop; and integration with Visual Studio, Microsoft's IDE for the .NET Framework, allowing Visual Studio to be used for creating applications for Android, iOS and Windows. At Microsoft Build 2016 Microsoft announced that they will open-source the Xamarin SDK and that they will bundle it as a free tool within Microsoft Visual Studio's integrated development environment, and Visual Studio Enterprise users would also get Xamarin's enterprise features free of charge.
Visual Studio 2017 offers new features like support for EditorConfig (a coding style enforcement framework), NGen support, .NET Core and Docker toolset (Preview), and Xamarin 4.3 (Preview).

Build (developer conference)

BuildBuild conferenceMicrosoft Build
At Microsoft Build 2016 Microsoft announced that they will open-source the Xamarin SDK and that they will bundle it as a free tool within Microsoft Visual Studio's integrated development environment, and Visual Studio Enterprise users would also get Xamarin's enterprise features free of charge.

MonoDevelop

SteticVisual Studio for Mac
In December 2012, Xamarin released Xamarin.Mac, a plugin for the existing MonoDevelop Integrated development environment (IDE), which allows developers to build C#-based applications for the Apple's macOS operating system and package them for publishing via the App Store.
Over time, the MonoDevelop project was absorbed into the rest of the Mono project and as of 2016, is actively maintained by Xamarin and the Mono community.

Native (computing)

nativenative modenatively
With a C#-shared codebase, developers can use Xamarin tools to write native Android, iOS, and Windows apps with native user interfaces and share code across multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux.

Android (operating system)

AndroidAndroid operating systemList of Android devices
With a C#-shared codebase, developers can use Xamarin tools to write native Android, iOS, and Windows apps with native user interfaces and share code across multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux.

IOS

Apple iOSiPhone OSiPhone
With a C#-shared codebase, developers can use Xamarin tools to write native Android, iOS, and Windows apps with native user interfaces and share code across multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux.

Microsoft Windows

WindowsPCMS Windows
With a C#-shared codebase, developers can use Xamarin tools to write native Android, iOS, and Windows apps with native user interfaces and share code across multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux.

Mobile app

appmobile applicationapps
With a C#-shared codebase, developers can use Xamarin tools to write native Android, iOS, and Windows apps with native user interfaces and share code across multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux.

User interface

UIinterfaceweb interface
With a C#-shared codebase, developers can use Xamarin tools to write native Android, iOS, and Windows apps with native user interfaces and share code across multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux.

MacOS

Mac OS XOS XMac
With a C#-shared codebase, developers can use Xamarin tools to write native Android, iOS, and Windows apps with native user interfaces and share code across multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux. In December 2012, Xamarin released Xamarin.Mac, a plugin for the existing MonoDevelop Integrated development environment (IDE), which allows developers to build C#-based applications for the Apple's macOS operating system and package them for publishing via the App Store.

Linux

GNU/LinuxLinux on the desktopLin
With a C#-shared codebase, developers can use Xamarin tools to write native Android, iOS, and Windows apps with native user interfaces and share code across multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux. After Microsoft first announced their .NET Framework in June 2000, de Icaza began investigating whether a Linux version was feasible.

GNOME

GNOME 3GNOME 2GNOME desktop environment
In 1999 Miguel de Icaza and Nat Friedman launched what would eventually be known as Ximian to support and develop software for de Icaza's nascent GNOME project.

Novell

Novell, Inc.Novell Inc.PGSoft
Ximian was bought by Novell on August 4, 2003, which was then acquired by Attachmate in April 2011.

Attachmate

Attachmate CorporationAttachmateWRQReflection X
Ximian was bought by Novell on August 4, 2003, which was then acquired by Attachmate in April 2011.

Tamarin

Saguinustamarinstamarin monkeys
The name Xamarin comes from the name of the Tamarin monkey, replacing the leading T with an X. This is in line with the naming theme used ever since Ximian was started.