Xenophonwikipedia
Xenophon of Athens (, Xenophōn; – 354 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, historian, soldier, mercenary, and student of Socrates.
XenophonXen.Xenophon of LampsacusXenoph.

Socrates

SocraticSocratesSocrate
Xenophon of Athens (, Xenophōn; – 354 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, historian, soldier, mercenary, and student of Socrates.
An enigmatic figure, he made no writings, and is known chiefly through the accounts of classical writers writing after his lifetime, particularly his students Plato and Xenophon.

Anabasis (Xenophon)

AnabasisThe AnabasisThe Persian Expedition
As one of the Ten Thousand (Greek mercenaries), Xenophon also participated in Cyrus the Younger's failed campaign to claim the Persian throne from his brother Artaxerxes II of Persia and recounted the events in Anabasis, his most notable history.
Anabasis ( ; an "expedition up from") is the most famous book of the Ancient Greek professional soldier and writer Xenophon.

Apology (Xenophon)

ApologyApology of Socrates to the Jurythat of
Like Plato (427–347 BC), Xenophon is an authority on Socrates, about whom he wrote several books of dialogues (the Memorabilia) and an Apology of Socrates to the Jury, which recounts the philosopher's trial in 399 BC. These works include Xenophon's Apology, Memorabilia, Symposium, and Oeconomicus.
The Apology of Socrates to the Jury, by Xenophon of Athens, is a Socratic dialogue about the legal defence that the philosopher Socrates presented at his trial for the moral corruption of Athenian youth; and for asebeia (impiety) against the pantheon of Athens; judged guilty, Socrates was sentenced to death.

Cyrus the Younger

CyrusCyrus the YoungerKourosh (Cyrus) the Younger
As one of the Ten Thousand (Greek mercenaries), Xenophon also participated in Cyrus the Younger's failed campaign to claim the Persian throne from his brother Artaxerxes II of Persia and recounted the events in Anabasis, his most notable history.
The history of Cyrus and of the retreat of the Greeks is told by Xenophon in his Anabasis.

Ten Thousand

Ten Thousand10,000 GreeksGreek army
As one of the Ten Thousand (Greek mercenaries), Xenophon also participated in Cyrus the Younger's failed campaign to claim the Persian throne from his brother Artaxerxes II of Persia and recounted the events in Anabasis, his most notable history.
Their march to the Battle of Cunaxa and back to Greece (401–399 BC) was recorded by Xenophon (one of their leaders) in his work The Anabasis.

Agesilaus II

AgesilausX.AgesKing Agesilaus II
His pro-oligarchic politics, military service under Spartan generals, in the Persian campaign and elsewhere, and his friendship with King Agesilaus II endeared Xenophon to the Spartans.
Agesilaus was greatly admired by his friend, the historian Xenophon, who wrote a minor work about him titled Agesilaus.

Memorabilia (Xenophon)

MemorabiliaMemorabilia of Xenophonmemoir of Socrates
Like Plato (427–347 BC), Xenophon is an authority on Socrates, about whom he wrote several books of dialogues (the Memorabilia) and an Apology of Socrates to the Jury, which recounts the philosopher's trial in 399 BC. These works include Xenophon's Apology, Memorabilia, Symposium, and Oeconomicus.
Memorabilia (original title in Greek: Ἀπομνημονεύματα, Apomnemoneumata) is a collection of Socratic dialogues by Xenophon, a student of Socrates.

Hellenica

HellenicaX.HGA History of My Time
As a historian, Xenophon is known for recording the history of his time, the late-5th and early-4th centuries BC, in such works as the Hellenica, which covered the final seven years and the aftermath of the Peloponnesian War (431–404 BC), thus representing a thematic continuation of Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War.
The surviving Hellenica is an important work of the Greek writer Xenophon and one of the principal sources for the final seven years of the Peloponnesian War not covered by Thucydides, and the war's aftermath.

Historian

historianhistoriansmilitary historian
Xenophon of Athens (, Xenophōn; – 354 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, historian, soldier, mercenary, and student of Socrates.
He was also the first to distinguish between cause and immediate origins of an event, while his successor Xenophon introduced autobiographical elements and character studies in his Anabasis.

Plato

PlatoPlato’sdialogues
Like Plato (427–347 BC), Xenophon is an authority on Socrates, about whom he wrote several books of dialogues (the Memorabilia) and an Apology of Socrates to the Jury, which recounts the philosopher's trial in 399 BC. Except for the dialogues of Plato, they are the only surviving representatives of the genre of Socratic dialogue.
But in a scenario in the Memorabilia, Xenophon confused the issue by presenting a Glaucon much younger than Plato.

Trial of Socrates

trial of Socratestrialdeath of Socrates
Like Plato (427–347 BC), Xenophon is an authority on Socrates, about whom he wrote several books of dialogues (the Memorabilia) and an Apology of Socrates to the Jury, which recounts the philosopher's trial in 399 BC.
Primary-source accounts of the trial and execution of Socrates are the Apology of Socrates by Plato and the Apology of Socrates to the Jury by Xenophon of Athens, who had been his student; contemporary interpretations include The Trial of Socrates (1988) by the journalist I. F. Stone, and Why Socrates Died: Dispelling the Myths (2009) by the Classics scholar Robin Waterfield.

Artaxerxes II of Persia

Artaxerxes IIArtaxerxesArtaxerxes II Mnemon
As one of the Ten Thousand (Greek mercenaries), Xenophon also participated in Cyrus the Younger's failed campaign to claim the Persian throne from his brother Artaxerxes II of Persia and recounted the events in Anabasis, his most notable history.
(The Greek historian Xenophon would later recount this battle in the Anabasis, focusing on the struggle of the now stranded Greek mercenaries to return home.)

Agesilaus (Xenophon)

Agesilaus
Some of his works have a pro–Spartan bias, especially the royal biography Agesilaus and the Constitution of the Spartans.
Agesilaus is a minor work by Xenophon.

History of the Peloponnesian War

Peloponnesian WarThe Peloponnesian Warmurder and enslavement of the local inhabitants
As a historian, Xenophon is known for recording the history of his time, the late-5th and early-4th centuries BC, in such works as the Hellenica, which covered the final seven years and the aftermath of the Peloponnesian War (431–404 BC), thus representing a thematic continuation of Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War.
For example, Xenophon wrote his Hellenica as a continuation of Thucydides' work, beginning at the exact moment that Thucydides' History leaves off.

Gryllus, son of Xenophon

Gryllus
Because his son Gryllus fought and died for Athens at the Battle of Mantinea in 362 BC, while Xenophon was still alive, Xenophon's banishment may have been revoked.
Gryllus was the elder son of Xenophon.

Thucydides

ThucydidesThuc.Thucydidean
As a historian, Xenophon is known for recording the history of his time, the late-5th and early-4th centuries BC, in such works as the Hellenica, which covered the final seven years and the aftermath of the Peloponnesian War (431–404 BC), thus representing a thematic continuation of Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War.
Readers in antiquity often placed the continuation of the stylistic legacy of the History in the writings of Thucydides' putative intellectual successor Xenophon.

Pythia

Delphic OracleoracleOracle at Delphi
Xenophon writes that he had asked the veteran Socrates for advice on whether to go with Cyrus, and that Socrates referred him to the divinely inspired Pythia.
Authors who mention the oracle include Aeschylus, Aristotle, Clement of Alexandria, Diodorus, Diogenes, Euripides, Herodotus, Julian, Justin, Livy, Lucan, Nepos, Ovid, Pausanias, Pindar, Plato, Plutarch, Sophocles, Strabo, Thucydides and Xenophon.

Trabzon

TrebizondTrapezusTrapezounta
They elected new leaders, including Xenophon himself, and fought their way north along the Tigris through hostile Persians and Medes to Trapezus on the coast of the Black Sea (Anabasis 4.8.22).
When Xenophon and the Ten Thousand mercenaries were fighting their way out of Persia, the first Greek city they reached was Trebizond (Xenophon, Anabasis, 5.5.10).

Battle of Cunaxa

battle of CunaxaCunaxaEgypt regains independence
The army of Cyrus met the army of Artaxerxes II in the Battle of Cunaxa.
The main source is Xenophon, a Greek soldier and eyewitness.

Cyropaedia

Cyropaediabiography of Cyrus the GreatCyropœdia
However, certain works of Xenophon, in particular the Cyropaedia, seem to show his oligarchic politics.
It was written around 370 BC by the Athenian gentleman-soldier, and student of Socrates, Xenophon of Athens.

Tarsus, Mersin

Tarsusof TarsusLady of Tarsus
At Tarsus the soldiers became aware of Cyrus's plans to depose the king, and as a result, refused to continue (Anabasis 1.3.1).
Indeed, Xenophon records that in 401 BC, when Cyrus the Younger marched against Babylon, the city was governed by King Syennesis in the name of the Persian monarch.

Oeconomicus

XenophonEconomyOeconomicus
These works include Xenophon's Apology, Memorabilia, Symposium, and Oeconomicus.
The Oeconomicus by Xenophon is a Socratic dialogue principally about household management and agriculture.

Socratic dialogue

dialoguedialoguesSocratic literature
Except for the dialogues of Plato, they are the only surviving representatives of the genre of Socratic dialogue.
It is preserved in the works of Plato and Xenophon.

Attic Greek

AtticAttic dialectGreek
Xenophon's works span several genres and are written in plain-language Attic Greek, for which reason they serve as translation exercises for contemporary students of the Ancient Greek language.
The first extensive works of literature in Attic are the plays of the dramatists Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes dating from the 5th century BC. The military exploits of the Athenians led to some universally read and admired history, as found in the works of Thucydides and Xenophon.

Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers

LivesLives of the PhilosophersLives of the Eminent Philosophers
In the Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, Diogenes Laërtius observed that, as a writer, Xenophon of Athens was known as the “Attic Muse”, for the sweetness of his diction (2.6).