Yalu River

YaluAmnok RiverAmnokAmrok RiverAmrokgangAmrokkangAprok RiverYalu (Amnok) RiverYalu (Amrok) RiverAmnoc River
The Yalu River, also called the Amrok River or Amnok River, is a river on the border between North Korea and China.wikipedia
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North Korea

Democratic People's Republic of KoreaNorthDPRK
The Yalu River, also called the Amrok River or Amnok River, is a river on the border between North Korea and China.
To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok (known as the Yalu in Chinese) and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two.

China–North Korea border

Manchurian borderNorth Korean borderborder
Together with the Tumen River to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea and China and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War. From 2500 m above sea level on Paektu Mountain on the China–North Korea border, the river flows south to Hyesan before sweeping 130 km northwest to Linjiang and then returning to a more southerly route for a further 300 km to empty into the Korea Bay between Dandong (China) and Sinuiju (North Korea).
From west to east, the Amnok river, Paektu Mountain, and the Tumen River divides the two countries.

Korean War

KoreaKoreanKorea War
Together with the Tumen River to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea and China and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War.
UN forces invaded North Korea in October 1950 and moved rapidly towards the Yalu River—the border with China—but on 19 October 1950, Chinese forces of the People's Volunteer Army (PVA) crossed the Yalu and entered the war.

Tumen River

TumenDuman RiverDuman
Together with the Tumen River to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea and China and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War.
Baekdu Mountain on the Chinese-North Korean border is the source of the river, as well as of the Amnok River, also called the Yalu River (which forms the western portion of the border of North Korea and China).

Paektu Mountain

Baekdu MountainMount PaektuChangbai Mountain
Together with the Tumen River to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea and China and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War. From 2500 m above sea level on Paektu Mountain on the China–North Korea border, the river flows south to Hyesan before sweeping 130 km northwest to Linjiang and then returning to a more southerly route for a further 300 km to empty into the Korea Bay between Dandong (China) and Sinuiju (North Korea).
The mountain is the source of the Songhua, Tumen and Yalu rivers.

Dandong

AndongAntungDandong City
From 2500 m above sea level on Paektu Mountain on the China–North Korea border, the river flows south to Hyesan before sweeping 130 km northwest to Linjiang and then returning to a more southerly route for a further 300 km to empty into the Korea Bay between Dandong (China) and Sinuiju (North Korea). The one remaining bridge was the Sino–Korean Friendship Bridge connecting Sinuiju, North Korea to Dandong, China.
It is the largest Chinese border city, facing Sinuiju, North Korea across the Yalu River, which demarcates the Sino-North Korean border.

Sinuiju

SinŭijuSinuijiSinŭiju-si
From 2500 m above sea level on Paektu Mountain on the China–North Korea border, the river flows south to Hyesan before sweeping 130 km northwest to Linjiang and then returning to a more southerly route for a further 300 km to empty into the Korea Bay between Dandong (China) and Sinuiju (North Korea). The one remaining bridge was the Sino–Korean Friendship Bridge connecting Sinuiju, North Korea to Dandong, China.
Sinŭiju ; Sinŭiju-si, known before 1925 in English as Yeng Byen City ) is a city in North Korea which faces Dandong, China across the international border of the Amnok River.

Russo-Japanese War

Russian-Japanese WarRusso Japanese WarRusso–Japanese War
Together with the Tumen River to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea and China and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War.
By the end of April, the Japanese Imperial Army under Kuroki Tamemoto was ready to cross the Yalu River into Russian-occupied Manchuria.

Liaoning

Liaoning ProvinceFengtianFengtian Province
The bordering Chinese provinces are Jilin and Liaoning.
The Yalu River marks its border with North Korea, emptying into the Korea Bay between Dandong in Liaoning and Sinuiju in North Korea.

Hyesan

Hyesan Ch'ŏngnyŏnHyesan CityHyesan 혜산 (惠山)
From 2500 m above sea level on Paektu Mountain on the China–North Korea border, the river flows south to Hyesan before sweeping 130 km northwest to Linjiang and then returning to a more southerly route for a further 300 km to empty into the Korea Bay between Dandong (China) and Sinuiju (North Korea).
The city is located in the Paektu Mountains at the border with the People's Republic of China (Jilin province), from which it is separated by the Yalu (Amrok) River.

Amrok River estuary Important Bird Area

The estuary is the site of the Amrok River estuary Important Bird Area, identified as such by BirdLife International.
The Amrok River estuary Important Bird Area comprises the North Korean part of the Amrok, or Yalu, estuary, with an area of 7,000 ha, abutting the border with China on the north-eastern coast of the Yellow Sea.

Hun River (Yalu River tributary)

Hun RiverHunHun Jiang River
The Yalu's most significant tributaries are the Changjin, the Hochon, the Tongro rivers from Korea and the Ai (or Aihe) and the Hun from China.
The Hun River in Northeast China, is the largest tributary on the right (Chinese) side of the Yalu River.

Goguryeo

KoguryoKoguryŏGoguryeo Kingdom
The river basin is the site where the ancient Korean kingdom of Goguryeo rose to power.
According to the 12th-century Samguk sagi and the 13th-century Samgungnyusa, a prince from the Buyeo kingdom named Jumong fled after a power struggle with other princes of the court and founded Goguryeo in 37 BCE in a region called Jolbon Buyeo, usually thought to be located in the middle Yalu and Tongjia River basin, overlapping the current China-North Korea border.

Hwanggumpyong Island

HwanggumpyongHwanggŭmp'yŏng
Due to the division criteria, some islands such as Hwanggumpyong Island belong to North Korea, but abut the Chinese side of the river.
Hwanggumpyong Island (황금평, undefined) is an island on the Yalu River, which forms a section of the land border between North Korea and China.

Ji'an, Jilin

Ji'anJianJi'an City
Many former fortresses are located along the river and the former capital of that kingdom was situated at what is now the medium-sized city of Ji'an, Jilin along the Yalu, a site rich in Goguryeo era relics.
Ji'an is separated from Manpo, Chagang Province, North Korea by the Yalu River; it has an international border running 203.5 km.

Wihwa Island

WihwaWihwado
Wihwa Island on the river is historically famous as the place where, in 1388, General Yi Songgye (later Taejo of Joseon) decided to turn back his army southward to Kaesong in the first of a series of revolts that eventually led to the establishment of the House of Yi.
Wihwa Island (위화도/威化島, Wihwado, ) is a river island in the Yalu river, lying on the border between North Korea and China.

Sino-Korean Friendship Bridge

Sino–Korean Friendship BridgeYalu River BridgeYalu River Railway Bridge
The one remaining bridge was the Sino–Korean Friendship Bridge connecting Sinuiju, North Korea to Dandong, China.
The Sino-Korean Friendship Bridge or China–North Korea Friendship Bridge is a bridge across the Amnok River on the China–North Korea border.

First Sino-Japanese War

Sino-Japanese WarSino-Japanese War (1894-1895)Sino–Japanese War
Together with the Tumen River to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea and China and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War.
The Japanese victory at Pyongyang had succeeded in pushing Chinese troops north to the Yalu river, in the process removing all effective Chinese military presence on the Korean Peninsula.

Jilin

Jilin ProvinceKirinKirin Province
The bordering Chinese provinces are Jilin and Liaoning.
Jilin is drained by the Yalu and Tumen rivers in the extreme southeast (which together form parts of the border between the People's Republic of China and North Korea), by tributaries of the Liao River in the southwest, and by the Songhua and Nen rivers in the north, both eventually flowing into the Amur.

Taejo of Joseon

Yi Seong-gyeTaejoKing Taejo
Wihwa Island on the river is historically famous as the place where, in 1388, General Yi Songgye (later Taejo of Joseon) decided to turn back his army southward to Kaesong in the first of a series of revolts that eventually led to the establishment of the House of Yi.
A staunchly opposed Yi was chosen to lead the invasion; however, at Wihwa Island on the Amrok River, he made a momentous decision, commonly called "Turning back the army from Wihwa Island", that would alter the course of Korean history.

Ai River (Dandong)

Ai (or Aihe)Aihe River
The Yalu's most significant tributaries are the Changjin, the Hochon, the Tongro rivers from Korea and the Ai (or Aihe) and the Hun from China.
The Ai River (Simplified (Traditional, but also 爱河/愛河 or 叆河/靉河) in Dangdong, Liaoning, China, is the largest tributary on the right (Chinese) side of the Yalu River that flows between China and North Korea.

MiG Alley

Black Thursdaynorthwestern Korea
During the war the valley surrounding the western end of the river also became the focal point of a series of dogfights for air superiority over North Korea, earning the nickname "MiG Alley" in reference to the MiG-15 fighters flown by the combined North Korean, Chinese and Soviet forces.
"MiG Alley" was the name given by United Nations (UN) pilots during the Korean War to the northwestern portion of North Korea, where the Yalu River empties into the Yellow Sea.

Korea Bay

West Korea BayKorean BayBay of Korea
From 2500 m above sea level on Paektu Mountain on the China–North Korea border, the river flows south to Hyesan before sweeping 130 km northwest to Linjiang and then returning to a more southerly route for a further 300 km to empty into the Korea Bay between Dandong (China) and Sinuiju (North Korea).
The Yalu (Amnok) River, which marks the border between China and North Korea, empties into the Korea Bay between Dandong (China) and Sinŭiju (North Korea).

Battle of Chongju (1950)

Battle of ChongjuChongjuBattle near to the Yalu River (1950)
The Battle of Chongju (29–30 October 1950) took place during the United Nations Command (UN) offensive towards the Yalu River, which followed the North Korean invasion of South Korea at the start of the Korean War.

Battle of the Yalu River (1894)

Battle of the Yalu RiverBattle of Yalu RiverBattle of the Yalu
The battle is also known by a variety of names: Battle of Haiyang Island, Battle of Dadonggou, Battle of the Yellow Sea and Battle of Yalu, after the geographic location of the battle, which was in the Yellow Sea off the mouth of the Yalu River and not in the river itself.