Yaqui

YaquisYaqui IndiansYaqui peopleYoremeYaqui IndianYoemeHiakipeopleThe Yoeme (Yaqui) NationYaqui (Yoeme) tribe
The Yaqui or Hiaki or Yoeme are an Uto-Aztecan speaking indigenous people of Mexico who inhabit the valley of the Río Yaqui in the Mexican state of Sonora and the Southwestern United States.wikipedia
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Sonora

Sonora, MexicoSonoranSonora State
The Yaqui or Hiaki or Yoeme are an Uto-Aztecan speaking indigenous people of Mexico who inhabit the valley of the Río Yaqui in the Mexican state of Sonora and the Southwestern United States.
Sonora is home to eight indigenous peoples, including the Mayo, the O’odham, the Yaqui, and Seri.

Chihuahua (state)

ChihuahuaChihuahua, Mexicostate of Chihuahua
They also have communities in Chihuahua and Durango.
According to anthropologist current natives tribes (Yaqui, Mayo, Opata, and Tarahumara) are descendants of the Casas Grandes culture.

Yaqui language

YaquiyaqYaqui or Yoreme language
This community has a population (estimated in 2006) of about 4,000; most of the middle-aged population of New Pascua speaks English, Spanish, and a moderate amount of Yaqui.
It is spoken by about 20,000 Yaqui people, in the Mexican state of Sonora and across the border in Arizona in the United States.

Guadalupe, Arizona

GuadalupeOur Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church (Guadalupe, Arizona)Town of Guadalupe
In Guadalupe, Arizona, established in 1904 and incorporated in 1975, more than 44 percent of the population is Native American, and many are trilingual in Yaqui, English and Spanish.
Since its founding, Guadalupe has been known as a center of Yaqui culture and it is home to many religious festivals.

Indigenous peoples of Mexico

indigenousindigenous people of Mexicoindigenous people
The Yaqui or Hiaki or Yoeme are an Uto-Aztecan speaking indigenous people of Mexico who inhabit the valley of the Río Yaqui in the Mexican state of Sonora and the Southwestern United States.
The Yaqui also had a long tradition of resistance, with the late nineteenth-century leader Cajemé being prominent.

Texas Band of Yaqui Indians

The Texas Band of Yaqui Indians, a state-recognized Tribe under Resolution SR#989 sponsored by state Sen. Charles Perry, consists of descendants of a band of Mountain Yaqui "who entered the State of Texas in the years of 1870–1875 under the leadership of Ya'ut (leader) Ave'lino Covajori Valenzuela Urquides".
The Texas Band of Yaqui Indians are descendants from a band of Mountain Yaqui Indian fighters from Sonora, Mexico.

Cáhita

CahitaTaracahitaTaracahitas
Yaqui speak a Cahitan language, a group of about 10 mutually-intelligible languages formerly spoken in much of the states of Sonora and Sinaloa.
Cáhita is a group of Indigenous peoples of Mexico, which includes the Yaqui and Mayo people.

Arizona

AZState of ArizonaArizona, U.S.
About 15,000 Yaqui speakers live in Mexico and 1,000 in the US, mostly Arizona.
U.S. soldiers stationed on the border confronted Yaqui Indians who were using Arizona as a base to raid the nearby Mexican settlements, as part of their wars against Mexico.

Pitch-accent language

pitch accentpitchaccent
The syllables which follow the tone are all high; see Pitch-accent language#Yaqui.
In the Mexican language Yaqui, the accent is signalled by an upstep before the accented syllable.

Cajemé

Under the leadership of Jose Maria Leyva, known as Cajemé, the Yaqui continued the struggle to maintain their independence until 1887, when Cajeme was caught and executed.
Cajemé / Kahe'eme (Yoeme or Yaqui Language for "one who does not stop to drink [water]"'), born and baptized José María Bonifacio Leyba Pérez (also spelled Leyva and Leiva), was a prominent Yaqui military leader who lived in the Mexican state of Sonora from 1835 to 1887.

Vícam

Vicam
The Jesuits persuaded the Yaqui to settle into eight towns: Bácum, Benem, Cócorit, Huirivis, Pótam, Rahum, Tórim, and Vícam.
It is one of the main settlements of the Yaqui people.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
In Guadalupe, Arizona, established in 1904 and incorporated in 1975, more than 44 percent of the population is Native American, and many are trilingual in Yaqui, English and Spanish.

Yaqui River

Río YaquiRio YaquiYaqui
The Yaqui or Hiaki or Yoeme are an Uto-Aztecan speaking indigenous people of Mexico who inhabit the valley of the Río Yaqui in the Mexican state of Sonora and the Southwestern United States.
As early as the 6th century AD, native inhabitants known as the Yoem Vatwe or Yaqui were living in family groups along the Rio Yaqui.

Anselmo Valencia Tori

In the late 1960s, several Yaqui in Arizona, among them Anselmo Valencia Tori and Fernando Escalante, started development of a tract of land about 8 km to the west of the Yaqui community of Hu'upa, calling it New Pascua (in Spanish, Pascua Nuevo).
A veteran with only a Grammar school education, he became a teacher, tribal historian, and the political and spiritual leader of the Yaqui peoples.

Mayo people

MayoMayosYoreme
Most of the Cahitan languages are extinct; only the Yaqui and Mayo still speak their language.
On arrival of the Spaniards in the today states of Sonora and Sinaloa, the Mayos were part of an Indian confederacy with the Apaches, Pima, and Yaqui.

Juan Banderas

A Yaqui revolt in 1825 was led by Juan Banderas.
Juan Banderas (executed 1833 at Arizpe) was the leader of the Yaqui during part of the Yaqui Wars, specifically from 1825 until 1833.

Hermosillo

Hermosillo, SonoraHermosillo, MexicoHermosillo, Sonora, Mexico
In the city of Hermosillo, colonies such as El Coloso, La Matanza, and Sarmiento are known as Yaqui districts; Yaqui residents there continue the culture and traditions of the Yaqui Nation.
In the Coloso neighborhood of Hermosillo, and other locations in Sonora, the Yaqui people are known for their celebrations of Holy Week, which mix Catholic and indigenous religious practices.

Porfirio Díaz

Porfirio DiazDíazDiaz
During the 34-year rule of Mexican dictator Porfirio Diaz, the government repeatedly provoked the Yaqui remaining in Sonora to rebellion in order to seize their land for exploitation by investors for both mining and agricultural use.
Opposition to Lerdo grew, particularly as his militant anti-clericalism increased, labor unrest grew, and a major rebellion of the Yaqui in northwest Mexico under the leadership of Cajemé challenged central government rule there.

Guaymas

Guaymas, SonoraGuaymas, MexicoGreater Guaymas
At Guaymas, thousands more Yaquis were put on boats and shipped to San Blas, where they were forced to walk more than 200 miles to San Marcos and its train station.
Before the arrival of the Europeans, the areas now known as Guaymas was dominated by the Guaymas, Seri and Yaqui tribes.

Cócorit

Cocorit
The Jesuits persuaded the Yaqui to settle into eight towns: Bácum, Benem, Cócorit, Huirivis, Pótam, Rahum, Tórim, and Vícam.
The town was founded in 1617 by the Spanish Jesuit missionaries Andrés Pérez de Ribas and Tomás Basilio, although the Spanish inhabitants were eventually forced to leave by the Yaqui native population of the area.

Bácum

Bacum
The Jesuits persuaded the Yaqui to settle into eight towns: Bácum, Benem, Cócorit, Huirivis, Pótam, Rahum, Tórim, and Vícam.
It is one of eight mission villages founded in the early seventeenth century by colonial Spanish Jesuit missionaries for the Indian Reductions of the Yaqui people.

Yaqui music

Deer DanceDanza del VenadoDanza del Venado (Deer Dance)
For instance, the Yaqui deer song (maso bwikam) accompanies the deer dance, which is performed by a pascola (Easter, from the Spanish pascua) dancer, also known as a "deer dancer".
Yaqui music is the music of the Yaqui tribe and people of Arizona and Sonora.

Roy Benavidez

Roy P. BenavidezRaul (Roy) Perez BenavidezRaul (Roy) Benavidez
He was a son of a Mexican American farmer, Salvador Benavidez and a Yaqui Native American mother, Teresa Perez.

Pascua Yaqui Tribe

Pascua YaquiCasino del SolPascua Pueblo Yaqui Reservation
The Pascua Yaqui Tribe is based in Tucson, Arizona.
The Pascua Yaqui Tribe is a federally recognized tribe of Yaqui Native Americans in southern Arizona.

Mario Martinez (painter)

Mario Martinez
He is a member of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe from New Penjamo (in Scottsdale), the smallest of six Yaqui settlements, in Arizona.