Yellow River

YellowHuang HeYellow River ValleyHe RiverHeHuangheHwang Hofloodsgreat riverHoang-ho
The Yellow River or Huang He is the second longest river in China, after the Yangtze River, and the sixth longest river system in the world at the estimated length of 5464 km.wikipedia
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China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
The Yellow River or Huang He is the second longest river in China, after the Yangtze River, and the sixth longest river system in the world at the estimated length of 5464 km.
China emerged as one of the world's first civilizations, in the fertile basin of the Yellow River in the North China Plain.

Shandong

Shandong ProvinceShantungShantung Province
Originating in the Bayan Har Mountains in Qinghai province of Western China, it flows through nine provinces, and it empties into the Bohai Sea near the city of Dongying in Shandong province.
Shandong has played a major role in Chinese history since the beginning of Chinese civilization along the lower reaches of the Yellow River.

List of rivers by length

longest riverfourth-longestlongest
The Yellow River or Huang He is the second longest river in China, after the Yangtze River, and the sixth longest river system in the world at the estimated length of 5464 km.

Warring States period

Warring StatesWarring States eraChina
Early Chinese literature including the Yu Gong or Tribute of Yu dating to the Warring States period (475–221 BC) refers to the Yellow River as simply (Old Chinese: *C.gˤaj, modern Chinese (Pinyin) Hé), a character that has come to mean "river" in modern usage.
The remaining three allies, Qi, Wei and Han, attacked Qin, driving up the Yellow River below Shanxi to the Hangu Pass.

Loess Plateau

yellow earthLoessloess deposits
One of its older Mongolian names was the "Black River", because the river runs clear before it enters the Loess Plateau, but the current name of the river among Inner Mongolians is Ȟatan Gol (, "Queen River").
The Loess Plateau, also known as the Huangtu Plateau, is a 640000 km2 plateau located around the Wei River valley and the southern half of the Ordos Loop of the Yellow River in central China.

Qinghai

Qinghai ProvinceKokonorTsinghai
Originating in the Bayan Har Mountains in Qinghai province of Western China, it flows through nine provinces, and it empties into the Bohai Sea near the city of Dongying in Shandong province.
During the Yuan dynasty's administrative rule of Tibet, the region comprising the headwaters of the Yellow and Yangtze rivers - what modern Tibetan nationalists call "Amdo" - was apportioned to different administrative divisions than Tibet proper.

Luoyang

ChengzhouLuoyang CityLuoyang, China
These accounts show that after the river passed Luoyang, it flowed along the border between Shanxi and Henan Provinces, then continued along the border between Hebei and Shandong before emptying into Bohai Bay near present-day Tianjin. As the Yellow River valley was the major entryway to the Guanzhong area and the state of Qin from the North China Plain, Qin heavily fortified the Hangu Pass; it saw numerous battles and was also an important chokepoint protecting the Han capitals of Chang'an and Luoyang.
Luoyang is a city located in the confluence area of Luo River and Yellow River in the west of Henan province.

North China Plain

Central Plainseastern plaingreat plain
When this happens, it bursts out across the flat North China Plain, sometimes taking a new channel and inundating any farmland, cities or towns in its path. As the Yellow River valley was the major entryway to the Guanzhong area and the state of Qin from the North China Plain, Qin heavily fortified the Hangu Pass; it saw numerous battles and was also an important chokepoint protecting the Han capitals of Chang'an and Luoyang.
The North China Plain is a large-scale downfaulted rift basin formed in late Paleogene and Neogene and then modified by the deposits of the Yellow River and is the largest alluvial plain of China.

Hebei

Hebei ProvinceHopeiHopeh
These accounts show that after the river passed Luoyang, it flowed along the border between Shanxi and Henan Provinces, then continued along the border between Hebei and Shandong before emptying into Bohai Bay near present-day Tianjin.
The name Hebei literally means "north of the river", referring to its location entirely to the north of the Yellow River.

Henan

Henan ProvinceHenan, ChinaHonan
These accounts show that after the river passed Luoyang, it flowed along the border between Shanxi and Henan Provinces, then continued along the border between Hebei and Shandong before emptying into Bohai Bay near present-day Tianjin.
Although the name of the province means "south of the [Yellow] river", approximately a quarter of the province lies north of the Yellow River, also known as the Huang He.

Wei River

WeiWei valleyWei He
In Chinese mythology, the giant Kua Fu drained the Yellow River and the Wei River to quench his burning thirst as he pursued the Sun.
It is the largest tributary of the Yellow River and very important in the early development of Chinese civilization.

Spring and Autumn period

Spring and AutumnChunqiuthe Spring and Autumn period
Historical documents from the Spring and Autumn period and Qin dynasty indicate that the Yellow River at that time flowed considerably north of its present course.
After the Zhou capital was sacked by the Marquess of Shen and the Quanrong barbarians, the Zhou moved the capital east from the now desolated Zongzhou in Haojing near modern Xi'an to Wangcheng in the Yellow River Valley.

Hangu Pass

Hanguguana place in ChinaHangu Guan
As the Yellow River valley was the major entryway to the Guanzhong area and the state of Qin from the North China Plain, Qin heavily fortified the Hangu Pass; it saw numerous battles and was also an important chokepoint protecting the Han capitals of Chang'an and Luoyang.
Hangu Pass or Hanguguan is a pass separating the upper Yellow River and Wei valleys—the cradle of Chinese civilization and seat of its longtime capital Xi'an—from the fertile North China Plain.

1887 Yellow River flood

1887 deluge1887 flood1887 Yellow River (Huang He) flood
Among the deadliest were the 1332–33 flood during the Yuan dynasty, the 1887 flood during the Qing dynasty which killed anywhere from 900,000 to 2 million people, and a Republic of China era 1931 flood (part of a massive number of floods that year) that killed 1–4 million people.
The 1887 Yellow River flood was a devastating flood on the Yellow River (Huang He) in China.

Tianjin

TientsinTianjin, ChinaTientsin, China
These accounts show that after the river passed Luoyang, it flowed along the border between Shanxi and Henan Provinces, then continued along the border between Hebei and Shandong before emptying into Bohai Bay near present-day Tianjin.
Nowadays Tianjin is a dual-core city, with its main urban area (including the old city) located along the Hai River, which connects to the Yellow and Yangtze Rivers via the Grand Canal; and Binhai, a New Area urban core located east of the old city, on the coast of the Bohai Gulf.

Song dynasty

SongSouthern Song dynastyNorthern Song dynasty
A similar proposal from the Song engineer Li Chun concerning flooding the lower reaches of the river to protect the central plains from the Khitai was overruled in 1020: the Chanyuan Treaty between the two states had expressly forbidden the Song from establishing new moats or changing river courses.
Although the Song dynasty had lost control of the traditional "birthplace of Chinese civilization" along the Yellow River, the Song economy was still strong, as the Southern Song empire contained a large population and productive agricultural land.

Chinese mythology

ChineseChinese legendmythology
In Chinese mythology, the giant Kua Fu drained the Yellow River and the Wei River to quench his burning thirst as he pursued the Sun.
Examples of these mythologized rivers include the Yangzi (including various stretches under different names), the Yellow River, the mythological Red River in the west, near Kunlun, and the Weak River, a mythological river in "the west", near "Kunlun", which flowed with a liquid too light in specific gravity for floating or swimming (but unbreathable).

Qin (state)

QinState of QinQin state
As the Yellow River valley was the major entryway to the Guanzhong area and the state of Qin from the North China Plain, Qin heavily fortified the Hangu Pass; it saw numerous battles and was also an important chokepoint protecting the Han capitals of Chang'an and Luoyang.
During the Xia and Shang dynasties, the Ying split in two: a western branch in Quanqiu (present-day Lixian in Gansu) and another branch that lived east of the Yellow River.

Guanzhong

Guanzhong PlaincentralGuanzhong Plains
As the Yellow River valley was the major entryway to the Guanzhong area and the state of Qin from the North China Plain, Qin heavily fortified the Hangu Pass; it saw numerous battles and was also an important chokepoint protecting the Han capitals of Chang'an and Luoyang.
The Yellow River cuts through the mountains at the Hangu Pass or Tong Pass separating Guanzhong from Guandong.

Kaifeng

DaliangBianjingDongjing
The 1642 flood was man-made, caused by the attempt of the Ming governor of Kaifeng to use the river to destroy the peasant rebels under Li Zicheng who had been besieging the city for the past six months.
Located along the Yellow River's southern bank, it borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the west, Xinxiang to the northwest, Shangqiu to the east, Zhoukou to the southeast, Xuchang to the southwest, and Heze of Shandong to the northeast.

1034 Yellow River flood

1034 floodone at Henglong in 1034
Breaches occurred regardless: one at Henglong in 1034 divided the course in three and repeatedly flooded the northern regions of Dezhou and Bozhou.
The 1034 Yellow River flood was a natural disaster along China's Yellow River originating in a burst fascine following heavy rainfall at Henglong in the territory of the Northern Song.

River

riverineriparianleft bank
The Yellow River or Huang He is the second longest river in China, after the Yangtze River, and the sixth longest river system in the world at the estimated length of 5464 km.

Yellow Sea

YellowWest SeaHuang Hai
For the first time in recorded history, the Yellow River shifted completely south of Shandong Peninsula and flowed into the Yellow Sea.
Into it flow both the Yellow River (through Shandong province and its capital Jinan) and Hai He (through Beijing and Tianjin).

Dongying

Dongying, SD
Originating in the Bayan Har Mountains in Qinghai province of Western China, it flows through nine provinces, and it empties into the Bohai Sea near the city of Dongying in Shandong province.
The city was established in 1983, as a base for developing the Yellow River Delta and China's second largest oilfield, Shengli Field.

Huai River

HuaiHuai watershedHuaihe River
The resulting major river avulsion allowed the Yellow to capture the tributaries of the Huai River.
It is located about midway between the Yellow River and Yangtze, the two largest rivers in China, and like them runs from west to east.