Yerida

Israeli diasporaabroadexpatriate Israelislive across the worldyordimyored
Yerida ( yerida, "descent") refers to emigration by Israeli Jews from the State of Israel (or in religious texts, Land of Israel).wikipedia
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Aliyah

immigratedimmigrantsolim
Yerida is the opposite of Aliyah (, lit. "ascent"), which is immigration to Israel.
The opposite action, emigration from the Land of Israel, is referred to in Hebrew as yerida ("descent").

Israel

State of IsraelIsraeliISR
Yerida ( yerida, "descent") refers to emigration by Israeli Jews from the State of Israel (or in religious texts, Land of Israel).
Jewish emigration from Israel (called yerida in Hebrew), primarily to the United States and Canada, is described by demographers as modest, but is often cited by Israeli government ministries as a major threat to Israel's future.

Israeli Jews

JewishIsraeli JewJews
Yerida ( yerida, "descent") refers to emigration by Israeli Jews from the State of Israel (or in religious texts, Land of Israel).
Since the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 the term "Yerida" has been used to mark the emigration of Jews from Israel, whether in groups (small or large) or individually.

Emigration

emigratedemigrateemigrant
Yerida ( yerida, "descent") refers to emigration by Israeli Jews from the State of Israel (or in religious texts, Land of Israel).

Taxation in Israel

Israel's tax lawtaxtaxation system
(see: Taxation in Israel).
The law was introduced in order to persuade many Israelis, who had made yerida (left the state of Israel) to return.

American Jews

JewishJewish AmericanJewish-American
The phenomenon of Israeli migration to the U.S. is often termed Yerida.

Land of Israel

Eretz IsraelEretz YisraelIsrael
Yerida ( yerida, "descent") refers to emigration by Israeli Jews from the State of Israel (or in religious texts, Land of Israel).

Palestinian political violence

Palestinian militant acts and operationsPalestinian terrorismPalestinian terrorist
Common reasons for emigration given are the high cost of living, a desire to escape from the instability of ongoing Palestinian political violence and the Arab–Israeli conflict, academic or professional ambitions, and disillusion with Israeli society.

Arab–Israeli conflict

Arab-Israeli conflictArab-Israeli WarIsraeli-Arab conflict
Common reasons for emigration given are the high cost of living, a desire to escape from the instability of ongoing Palestinian political violence and the Arab–Israeli conflict, academic or professional ambitions, and disillusion with Israeli society.

Torah

PentateuchLawWritten Torah
The use of the Hebrew word "Yored" (which means "descending") is a modern renewal of a term taken from the Torah: "" ("I myself will go down with you to Egypt, and I will also bring you up again" Genesis 46:4),

Mishnah

MishnaMishnaicmishnayot
and from the Mishnah: "",

Talmud

Babylonian TalmudTalmudicTalmudist
and from the Talmud "" (The Land of Israel is higher than all the [other] lands).

Halakha

Jewish lawhalakhicHalacha
Jewish Law or Halakha defines certain restrictions on emigration from Israel.

Maimonides

RambamMoses MaimonidesMaimonidean
According to Moses Maimonides, it is only permitted to emigrate and resettle abroad in cases of severe hunger.

Hunger

hungrysatietyEnd hunger
According to Moses Maimonides, it is only permitted to emigrate and resettle abroad in cases of severe hunger.

Joseph Trani

Joseph di TraniJoseph ben Moses di TraniJoseph ben Moses Miṭrani the Elder
Joseph Trani determined that it is permissible to emigrate from Israel for marriage, to study Torah or to support oneself, including in cases where famine is not present.

Zionism

ZionistZionistsZionist movement
It is difficult to estimate the number of people who emigrated from Israel between the start of the Zionist movement and the establishment of the state of Israel, or the proportion of emigrants compared with the number of immigrants into the country.

First Aliyah

FirstFirst AliyaHalutz
Estimates of the extent of emigration during the period of the initial Zionist settlement in Palestine with the First Aliyah, as well as the Second Aliyah, range between approximately 40% (an estimation made by Joshua Kaniel) of all immigrants and up to 80–90%.

Second Aliyah

secondSecond Aliyaemigrated to Ottoman Palestine
Estimates of the extent of emigration during the period of the initial Zionist settlement in Palestine with the First Aliyah, as well as the Second Aliyah, range between approximately 40% (an estimation made by Joshua Kaniel) of all immigrants and up to 80–90%.

Fourth Aliyah

FourthFourth ''AliyahJewish immigrants
In the latter part of the Fourth Aliyah, during 1926–1928, the mandatory authorities recorded 17,972 Jewish immigrants, and the Jewish Agency counted about 1,100 more who were not registered with the authorities.

Mandatory Palestine

PalestineBritish Mandate of PalestineBritish Mandate authorities
In the latter part of the Fourth Aliyah, during 1926–1928, the mandatory authorities recorded 17,972 Jewish immigrants, and the Jewish Agency counted about 1,100 more who were not registered with the authorities.

Jewish Agency for Israel

Jewish AgencyJewish Agency for PalestineThe Jewish Agency
In the latter part of the Fourth Aliyah, during 1926–1928, the mandatory authorities recorded 17,972 Jewish immigrants, and the Jewish Agency counted about 1,100 more who were not registered with the authorities.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
However, some 10% of these immigrants would leave the country in the following years, primarily to Canada, Australia, and South America.

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
However, some 10% of these immigrants would leave the country in the following years, primarily to Canada, Australia, and South America.

South America

South AmericanSouthSouth-America
However, some 10% of these immigrants would leave the country in the following years, primarily to Canada, Australia, and South America.