Yes–no question

yes-no questionyes/no questionpolar questionyes-no questionsPolar questionsyes or no questionYes/Noyes/no questionsyes/no-questionalternative question
In linguistics, a yes–no question, formally known as a polar question or a general question, is a question whose expected answer is either "yes" or "no".wikipedia
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Yes and no

noyesyes" or "no
In linguistics, a yes–no question, formally known as a polar question or a general question, is a question whose expected answer is either "yes" or "no".
Some languages do not answer yes–no questions with single words meaning 'yes' or 'no'.

Question

answerwh-questionquestions
In linguistics, a yes–no question, formally known as a polar question or a general question, is a question whose expected answer is either "yes" or "no". Yes–no questions are in contrast with non-polar wh-questions, with the five Ws, which do not necessarily present a range of alternative answers, or necessarily restrict that range to two alternatives.
Questions that ask whether or not some statement is true are called yes–no questions (or polar questions, or general questions ), since they can in principle be answered by a "yes" or "no" (or similar words or expressions in other languages).

Intonation (linguistics)

intonationintonationalintonations
In some languages, such as in Modern Greek, Portuguese, and the Jakaltek language, the only way to distinguish a yes–no question from a simple declarative statement is the rising question intonation used when saying the question.
example: it is claimed that in English a falling pitch movement is associated with statements, but a rising pitch turns a statement into a yes–no question, as in He's going ↗home?. This use of intonation is more typical of American English than of British.

Clitic

encliticprocliticenclitics
In Latin, yes–no questions are indicated by the addition of a special grammatical particle or an enclitic.
Gothic: Sentence clitics appear in second position in accordance with Wackernagel's Law, including -u (yes-no question), -uh "and", þan "then", ƕa "anything", for example ab-u þus silbin "of thyself?". Multiple clitics can be stacked up, and split a preverb from the rest of the verb if the preverb comes at the beginning of the clause, e.g. diz-uh-þan-sat ijōs "and then he seized them (fem.)", ga-u-ƕa-sēƕi "whether he saw anything".

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
In English, a special word order (verb–subject–object) is used to form yes–no questions.
Both yes–no questions and wh-questions in English are mostly formed using subject–auxiliary inversion (Am I going tomorrow?, Where can we eat?), which may require do-support (Do you like her?, Where did he go?). In most cases, interrogative words (wh-words; e.g. what, who, where, when, why, how) appear in a fronted position.

Echo answer

echo responserepeats the verb used in the question
The resulting response is usually an echo response.
In linguistics, an echo answer or echo response is a way of answering a polar question without using words for yes and no.

A-not-A question

A-not-A
In Chinese, yes–no questions typically take an A-not-A form.
In linguistics, an A-not-A question is a polar question that offers two opposite possibilities for the answer.

Decision problem

undecidabledecision problemsdecision procedure
Decision problem
In computability theory and computational complexity theory, a decision problem is a problem that can be posed as a yes-no question of the input values.

Polish language

Polishplpol.
In New Guinea Pidgin, Polish and Huichol, the answer given has the logical polarity implied by the form of the question.
Yes-no questions (both direct and indirect) are formed by placing the word czy at the start.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
In linguistics, a yes–no question, formally known as a polar question or a general question, is a question whose expected answer is either "yes" or "no".

Exclusive or

XORexclusive-orexclusive disjunction
Formally, they present an exclusive disjunction, a pair of alternatives of which only one is acceptable.

Five Ws

Circumstanceswho, what, when, where, why and how5 W
Yes–no questions are in contrast with non-polar wh-questions, with the five Ws, which do not necessarily present a range of alternative answers, or necessarily restrict that range to two alternatives.

Verb–subject–object

VSOverb-subject-objectVERB – SUBJECT – OBJECT
In English, a special word order (verb–subject–object) is used to form yes–no questions.

Greenlandic language

GreenlandicKalaallisutGreenlandic Inuit
In the Greenlandic language, yes–no questions are formed with a special verb morphology.

Latin

Lat.Latin languagelat
In Latin, yes–no questions are indicated by the addition of a special grammatical particle or an enclitic. In Latin, the enclitic particle -ne (sometimes just "-n" in Old Latin) can be added to the emphatic word to turn a declarative statement into a yes–no question.

Grammatical particle

particleparticlesgrammatical particles
In Latin, yes–no questions are indicated by the addition of a special grammatical particle or an enclitic.

Modern Greek

GreekModernmodern Greek language
In some languages, such as in Modern Greek, Portuguese, and the Jakaltek language, the only way to distinguish a yes–no question from a simple declarative statement is the rising question intonation used when saying the question.

Portuguese language

PortuguesePortuguese-languageBrazilian Portuguese
In some languages, such as in Modern Greek, Portuguese, and the Jakaltek language, the only way to distinguish a yes–no question from a simple declarative statement is the rising question intonation used when saying the question.

Jakaltek language

JakaltekJacaltecjac
In some languages, such as in Modern Greek, Portuguese, and the Jakaltek language, the only way to distinguish a yes–no question from a simple declarative statement is the rising question intonation used when saying the question.

Sentence (linguistics)

sentencesentencesdeclarative sentence
In some languages, such as in Modern Greek, Portuguese, and the Jakaltek language, the only way to distinguish a yes–no question from a simple declarative statement is the rising question intonation used when saying the question.

Old Latin

archaic formarchaic Latinearly Latin
In Latin, the enclitic particle -ne (sometimes just "-n" in Old Latin) can be added to the emphatic word to turn a declarative statement into a yes–no question.

Esperanto

EsperantistEsperantistsEsperanto language
In Esperanto, the word ĉu added to the beginning of a statement makes it a polar question.

Nonne

Burgwarte Nonnenstein
Yes–no questions are also formed in Latin with nonne to imply that the interrogator thinks the answer to be the affirmative and with num to imply that the interrogator thinks the answer to be the negative.

Num

Yes–no questions are also formed in Latin with nonne to imply that the interrogator thinks the answer to be the affirmative and with num to imply that the interrogator thinks the answer to be the negative.

Chinese language

ChineseRegional dialectChinese:
In Chinese, yes–no questions typically take an A-not-A form.