Yes and no

noyesyes" or "noyes or noAyeUh-huh" and "Uh-uhyes" and "noyes/noyes'', ''nouh-huh
Yes and no, or word pairs with a similar usage, are expressions of the affirmative and the negative, respectively, in several languages including English.wikipedia
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Yes

yeajaYeah
The words yes and no are not easily classified into any of the eight conventional parts of speech.
* An affirmative particle in the English language; see yes and no

No

nay
The words yes and no are not easily classified into any of the eight conventional parts of speech.
Yes and no are positive and negative responses

Pro-sentence

They are sometimes classified as a part of speech in their own right, sentence words, word sentences, or pro-sentences, although that category contains more than yes and no and not all linguists include them in their lists of sentence words.
In English, yes, no, okay and amen are common pro-sentences.

Yes–no question

yes-no questionyes/no questionpolar question
Some languages do not answer yes–no questions with single words meaning 'yes' or 'no'.
In linguistics, a yes–no question, formally known as a polar question or a general question, is a question whose expected answer is either "yes" or "no".

Affirmation and negation

negationnegativepolarity
Yes and no, or word pairs with a similar usage, are expressions of the affirmative and the negative, respectively, in several languages including English.
Affirmative and negative responses (especially, though not exclusively, to questions) are often expressed using particles or words such as yes and no, where yes is the affirmative and no the negative particle.

Non

French has oui, si, and non.
French equivalent to "no"

Echo answer

echo responserepeats the verb used in the question
(This is an echo response.) The answer to "Tuletteko kaupungista?" In all languages, yes-no questions are often posed in A-not-A form, and the replies to such questions are echo answers that echo either A or not A.
In linguistics, an echo answer or echo response is a way of answering a polar question without using words for yes and no.

Sentence word

sentence wordsword sentencesword sentence
They are sometimes classified as a part of speech in their own right, sentence words, word sentences, or pro-sentences, although that category contains more than yes and no and not all linguists include them in their lists of sentence words.
Various phrases in various languages have devolved into the words for "yes" and "no" (which can be found discussed in detail in yes and no), and these include expletive sentence words such as "Well!"

A-not-A question

A-not-A
In all languages, yes-no questions are often posed in A-not-A form, and the replies to such questions are echo answers that echo either A or not A.
is a neutral question where the answer to this can be yes or no in response to the first and more explicitly stated alternative.

Aye aye, sir

Aye, AyeAye-Ayeaye
In naval language, the phrase Aye aye, sir is used to acknowledge a direct order, and indicates the speaker both understands the order and will comply with it; a single "aye" is a synonym for "yes" and simply indicates agreement.
It is derived from a duplicate of the word "aye" which came into the English language in the late 16th century and early 17th century, meaning "Yes; even so.".

Nay

While Modern English has a two-form system of yes and no for affirmatives and negatives, earlier forms of English had a four-form system, comprising the words yea, nay, yes, and no.
An archaic form of no, used mainly in oral voting, and the opposite of yea

Yeah

* Yeah is a synonym of yes; see yes and no.

That's the Way (I Like It)

That's the wayTHAT'S THE WAY '98That's the Way I Like It
At the time, this song was considered by some to be rather risqué because of the obvious meaning behind the title as well as its chorus with multiple "uh-huhs" and its verses.

Yes and no (disambiguation)

Yes and no is a system for expressing affirmative and negative in the English language.

Yea

*An archaic form of yes, the opposite of nay

Not

Not, the general declarative form of "no", indicating a negation of a related statement that it usually precedes; see yes and no

Five Ws

CircumstancesWho? What? Where? Why? and How? questionsWho, what, when, where, why, how
Importantly, none of these questions can be answered with a simple "yes" or "no".

Interrogative

interrogative sentenceinterrogative moodQuestions
Interrogative sentences are generally divided between yes–no questions, which ask whether or not something is the case (and invite an answer of the yes/no type), and wh-questions, which specify the information being asked about using a word like which, who, how, etc.

Double-barreled question

compound questionmore than one issuedouble barrelled question
In other words, while some respondents would answer "yes" to both and some "no" to both, some would like to answer both "yes and no".

Yep

A form of yes, an affirmative particle in the English language; see yes and no

Binomial distribution

binomialbinomial random variablebinomially distributed
In probability theory and statistics, the binomial distribution with parameters n and p is the discrete probability distribution of the number of successes in a sequence of n independent experiments, each asking a yes–no question, and each with its own boolean-valued outcome: a random variable containing a single bit of information: success/yes/true/one (with probability p) or failure/no/false/zero (with probability q = 1 − p). A single success/failure experiment is also called a Bernoulli trial or Bernoulli experiment and a sequence of outcomes is called a Bernoulli process; for a single trial, i.e., n = 1, the binomial distribution is a Bernoulli distribution.

List of ecclesiastical abbreviations

S.T.P.License in Sacred Theologyle Trésor de Chronologie
In the transaction of ordinary business the Roman Congregations are wont to use certain brief and pithy formulas (e.g. Negative = "No"; Negative et amplius = "No with emphasis").