Yip Harburg

E.Y. HarburgE. Y. HarburgE.Y. "Yip" HarburgHarburgE. Y. "Yip" HarburgEdgar Yipsel HarburgEdgar Yipsel "Yip" HarburgE. Y. ("Yip") HarburgE.Y HarburgE.Y. Harbourg
Edgar Yipsel "Yip" Harburg (born Isidore Hochberg, איסידור הוכברג; April 8, 1896 – March 5, 1981) was an American popular song lyricist and librettist who worked with many well-known composers.wikipedia
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Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?

Brother Can You Spare a Dime?Brother Can You Spare A DimeBrother, Can You Spare A Dime
He wrote the lyrics to the standards "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" (with Jay Gorney), "April in Paris", and "It's Only a Paper Moon", as well as all of the songs for the film The Wizard of Oz, including "Over the Rainbow". Gershwin introduced Harburg to Jay Gorney, who collaborated with him on songs for an Earl Carroll Broadway review (Earl Carroll's Sketchbook): the show was successful and Harburg was engaged as lyricist for a series of successful revues, including Americana in 1932, for which he wrote the lyrics of "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" to the tune of a lullaby Gorney had learned as a child in Russia.
Written in 1930 by lyricist E. Y. "Yip" Harburg and composer Jay Gorney, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?"

April in Paris (song)

April in ParisApril in PareessApril in Paris" (song)
He wrote the lyrics to the standards "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" (with Jay Gorney), "April in Paris", and "It's Only a Paper Moon", as well as all of the songs for the film The Wizard of Oz, including "Over the Rainbow".
"April in Paris" is a popular song composed by Vernon Duke with lyrics by Yip Harburg in 1932 for the Broadway musical Walk a Little Faster.

The Wizard of Oz (1939 film)

The Wizard of OzWizard of OzThe Jitterbug
He wrote the lyrics to the standards "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" (with Jay Gorney), "April in Paris", and "It's Only a Paper Moon", as well as all of the songs for the film The Wizard of Oz, including "Over the Rainbow". Harburg and Gorney were offered a contract with Paramount: in Hollywood, Harburg worked with composers Harold Arlen, Vernon Duke, Jerome Kern, Jule Styne, and Burton Lane, and later wrote the lyrics for The Wizard of Oz, one of the earliest known "integrated musicals," for which he won the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Song for "Over the Rainbow."
The songs were written by Edgar "Yip" Harburg (lyrics) and Harold Arlen (music).

Harold Arlen

ArlenH. ArlenHarold
Harburg and Gorney were offered a contract with Paramount: in Hollywood, Harburg worked with composers Harold Arlen, Vernon Duke, Jerome Kern, Jule Styne, and Burton Lane, and later wrote the lyrics for The Wizard of Oz, one of the earliest known "integrated musicals," for which he won the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Song for "Over the Rainbow."
In addition to composing the songs for the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz (lyrics by Yip Harburg), including "Over the Rainbow", Arlen is a highly regarded contributor to the Great American Songbook.

Ira Gershwin

GershwinIraI. Gershwin
He attended Townsend Harris High School, where he and Ira Gershwin, who met over a shared fondness for Gilbert and Sullivan, worked on the school paper and became lifelong friends.
He graduated in 1914 from Townsend Harris High School, a public school for intellectually gifted students, where he met Yip Harburg, with whom he enjoyed a lifelong friendship and a love of Gilbert and Sullivan.

Vernon Duke

DukeVladimir DukelskyDuke, Vernon
Harburg and Gorney were offered a contract with Paramount: in Hollywood, Harburg worked with composers Harold Arlen, Vernon Duke, Jerome Kern, Jule Styne, and Burton Lane, and later wrote the lyrics for The Wizard of Oz, one of the earliest known "integrated musicals," for which he won the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Song for "Over the Rainbow."
He is best known for "Taking a Chance on Love" with lyrics by Ted Fetter and John Latouche (1940), "I Can't Get Started" with lyrics by Ira Gershwin (1936), "April in Paris" with lyrics by E. Y. ("Yip") Harburg (1932), and "What Is There To Say" for the Ziegfeld Follies of 1934, also with Harburg.

Jerome Kern

KernJerome David KernGeorge Byron
Harburg and Gorney were offered a contract with Paramount: in Hollywood, Harburg worked with composers Harold Arlen, Vernon Duke, Jerome Kern, Jule Styne, and Burton Lane, and later wrote the lyrics for The Wizard of Oz, one of the earliest known "integrated musicals," for which he won the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Song for "Over the Rainbow." for Can't Help Singing, shared with Jerome Kern in (1944).
He collaborated with many of the leading librettists and lyricists of his era, including George Grossmith Jr., Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Otto Harbach, Oscar Hammerstein II, Dorothy Fields, Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin and Yip Harburg.

Finian's Rainbow

Finian’s Rainbow1947 stage musical of the same namerevival
Harburg's best known Broadway show, Finian's Rainbow (1947) was, in its original production, possibly the first Broadway musical with a racially integrated chorus line, and features his "When the Idle Poor Become the Idle Rich."
Finian's Rainbow is a musical with a book by E.Y. Harburg and Fred Saidy, lyrics by Harburg, and music by Burton Lane, produced by Lee Sabinson.

Bloomer Girl

In the 1940s, he wrote a series of "book" musicals with social messages, including the successful Bloomer Girl (1944), set during the Civil War, which was about temperance and women's rights activist Amelia Bloomer.
Bloomer Girl is a 1944 Broadway musical with music by Harold Arlen, lyrics by E.Y. Harburg, and a book by Sig Herzig and Fred Saidy, based on an unpublished play by Lilith and Dan James.

Finian's Rainbow (1968 film)

Finian's RainbowFinian’s Rainbowa film in 1968
It was made into a film in 1968 starring Fred Astaire and Petula Clark, directed by Francis Ford Coppola.
The screenplay by E. Y. Harburg and Fred Saidy is based on their 1947 stage musical of the same name.

Academy Award for Best Original Song

Best Original SongBest SongAcademy Award for Best Song
Harburg and Gorney were offered a contract with Paramount: in Hollywood, Harburg worked with composers Harold Arlen, Vernon Duke, Jerome Kern, Jule Styne, and Burton Lane, and later wrote the lyrics for The Wizard of Oz, one of the earliest known "integrated musicals," for which he won the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Song for "Over the Rainbow."

Jay Gorney

He wrote the lyrics to the standards "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" (with Jay Gorney), "April in Paris", and "It's Only a Paper Moon", as well as all of the songs for the film The Wizard of Oz, including "Over the Rainbow". Gershwin introduced Harburg to Jay Gorney, who collaborated with him on songs for an Earl Carroll Broadway review (Earl Carroll's Sketchbook): the show was successful and Harburg was engaged as lyricist for a series of successful revues, including Americana in 1932, for which he wrote the lyrics of "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" to the tune of a lullaby Gorney had learned as a child in Russia.
Later, Ira Gershwin introduced him to lyricist Yip Harburg, who became a frequent collaborator.

Flahooley

With a score by Sammy Fain and Harburg's lyrics, the musical Flahooley (1951) satirized the country's anti-communist sentiment, but it closed after forty performances at the Broadhurst Theatre on Broadway.
Flahooley is a musical with a book by E. Y. Harburg and Fred Saidy, lyrics by Harburg, and music by Sammy Fain.

Musical theatre

musicalmusicalsmusical comedy
Gershwin introduced Harburg to Jay Gorney, who collaborated with him on songs for an Earl Carroll Broadway review (Earl Carroll's Sketchbook): the show was successful and Harburg was engaged as lyricist for a series of successful revues, including Americana in 1932, for which he wrote the lyrics of "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" to the tune of a lullaby Gorney had learned as a child in Russia.
Irving Berlin used sharpshooter Annie Oakley's career as a basis for his Annie Get Your Gun (1946, 1,147 performances); Burton Lane, E. Y. Harburg and Fred Saidy combined political satire with Irish whimsy for their fantasy Finian's Rainbow (1947, 725 performances); and Cole Porter found inspiration in William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew for Kiss Me, Kate (1948, 1,077 performances).

Hurry Sundown (Peter, Paul and Mary song)

Hurry SundownHurry Sundown" (Peter, Paul and Mary song)
In 1966, songwriter Earl Robinson sought Harburg's help for the song "Hurry Sundown"; the two collaborated on the song and are credited as co-writers.
"Hurry Sundown" is a 1966 song written by Yip Harburg and Earl Robinson, and first recorded by the folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary.

Townsend Harris High School

Townsend Harris HallTownsend Harris Hall High School
He attended Townsend Harris High School, where he and Ira Gershwin, who met over a shared fondness for Gilbert and Sullivan, worked on the school paper and became lifelong friends.

Lower East Side

Lower East Side, ManhattanCorlear's HookLower East Side of Manhattan
Harburg, the youngest of four surviving children (out of ten), was born Isidore Hochberg on the Lower East Side of New York City on April 8, 1896.

Gilbert and Sullivan

Gilbert & SullivancollaborationGilbert and Sullivan Society
He attended Townsend Harris High School, where he and Ira Gershwin, who met over a shared fondness for Gilbert and Sullivan, worked on the school paper and became lifelong friends.
The American and British musical owes a tremendous debt to G&S, who were admired and copied by early musical theatre authors and composers such as Ivan Caryll, Adrian Ross, Lionel Monckton, P. G. Wodehouse, Guy Bolton and Victor Herbert, and later Jerome Kern, Ira Gershwin, Yip Harburg, Irving Berlin, Ivor Novello, Oscar Hammerstein II, and Andrew Lloyd Webber.

AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs

AFI's 100 Years ... 100 Songs100 Years...100 Songs100 Years ... 100 Songs
On June 22, 2004 the American Film Institute broadcast AFI's 100 Years ... 100 Songs, a TV special announcing the 100 greatest film songs.

Ding-Dong! The Witch Is Dead

Ding Dong the Witch Is DeadCome Out, Come Out, Wherever You AreCome Out, Come Out; Ding-Dong! The Witch Is Dead
"Over the Rainbow" was Number One, and "Ding-Dong! The Witch Is Dead" was Number 82.
It was composed by Harold Arlen, with the lyrics written by E.Y. Harburg.

It's Only a Paper Moon

Paper Moon(It's Only) A Paper MoonA Paper Moon
He wrote the lyrics to the standards "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" (with Jay Gorney), "April in Paris", and "It's Only a Paper Moon", as well as all of the songs for the film The Wizard of Oz, including "Over the Rainbow".
"It's Only a Paper Moon" is a popular song published in 1933 with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by Yip Harburg and Billy Rose.

Lydia the Tattooed Lady

Lydia, The Tattooed Lady
"Lydia, the Tattooed Lady" is a 1939 song written by Yip Harburg and Harold Arlen.

Down with Love (song)

Down with Love
"Down with Love" is a popular song with lyrics by E.Y. Harburg and music by Harold Arlen.

Can't Help Singing

musical of the same name
for Can't Help Singing, shared with Jerome Kern in (1944).
Durbin's only Technicolor film, Can't Help Singing was produced by Felix Jackson and scored by Jerome Kern with lyrics by E. Y. Harburg.

Last Night When We Were Young

"Last Night When We Were Young" is a 1935 popular song about nostalgia and young love composed by Harold Arlen, with lyrics by Yip Harburg.