Yokohama

Yokohama, JapanYokohama, KanagawaYokohama CityYokohama BayAdvanCity of YokohamahistoryHonmokuKanagawaPresented by Yokohama
Yokohama is the second largest city in Japan by population, and the most populous municipality of Japan.wikipedia
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Lyon

Minatomirai Line

Minato Mirai Lineline of the train in YokohamaMinatomirai 21 Line
The Yokohama Municipal Subway, Minatomirai Line and Kanazawa Seaside Line provide metro services.

List of cities in Japan

cityList of Japanese cities by population11 other cities
Yokohama is the second largest city in Japan by population, and the most populous municipality of Japan.

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
Yokohama is the second largest city in Japan by population, and the most populous municipality of Japan.

Municipalities of Japan

municipalitymunicipalitiescity
Yokohama is the second largest city in Japan by population, and the most populous municipality of Japan.

Honshu

HonshūHonshu IslandHonshu, Japan
It lies on Tokyo Bay, south of Tokyo, in the Kantō region of the main island of Honshu.

Port

seaportport cityfishing port
Yokohama developed rapidly as Japan's prominent port city following the end of Japan's relative isolation in the mid-19th century, and is today one of its major ports along with Kobe, Osaka, Nagoya, Hakata, Tokyo, and Chiba.

Kobe

Kobe, JapanKōbeKobe, Hyogo
Yokohama developed rapidly as Japan's prominent port city following the end of Japan's relative isolation in the mid-19th century, and is today one of its major ports along with Kobe, Osaka, Nagoya, Hakata, Tokyo, and Chiba.

Osaka

Osaka, JapanŌsakaOsaka, Osaka
Yokohama developed rapidly as Japan's prominent port city following the end of Japan's relative isolation in the mid-19th century, and is today one of its major ports along with Kobe, Osaka, Nagoya, Hakata, Tokyo, and Chiba.

Hakata-ku, Fukuoka

HakataHakata-kuHakata, Fukuoka
Yokohama developed rapidly as Japan's prominent port city following the end of Japan's relative isolation in the mid-19th century, and is today one of its major ports along with Kobe, Osaka, Nagoya, Hakata, Tokyo, and Chiba.

Chiba (city)

ChibaChiba CityChiba, Chiba
Yokohama developed rapidly as Japan's prominent port city following the end of Japan's relative isolation in the mid-19th century, and is today one of its major ports along with Kobe, Osaka, Nagoya, Hakata, Tokyo, and Chiba.

Edo period

Tokugawa periodEdo-periodEdo
Yokohama was a small fishing village up to the end of the feudal Edo period, when Japan held a policy of national seclusion, having little contact with foreigners.

Sakoku

national isolation policynational seclusionnational isolation
Yokohama was a small fishing village up to the end of the feudal Edo period, when Japan held a policy of national seclusion, having little contact with foreigners.

Tokugawa shogunate

bakufuTokugawaJapan
A major turning point in Japanese history happened in 1853–54, when Commodore Matthew Perry arrived just south of Yokohama with a fleet of American warships, demanding that Japan open several ports for commerce, and the Tokugawa shogunate agreed by signing the Treaty of Peace and Amity.

Edo

YedoEdo CityEdo Honmachi
It was initially agreed that one of the ports to be opened to foreign ships would be the bustling town of Kanagawa-juku (in what is now Kanagawa Ward) on the Tōkaidō, a strategic highway that linked Edo to Kyoto and Osaka.

Moat

moatsfossemoated
Kannai, the foreign trade and commercial district (literally, inside the barrier), was surrounded by a moat, foreign residents enjoying extraterritorial status both within and outside the compound.