Young Czech Party

Young CzechEdvard GrégrJulius GrégrYoung CzechsEduard GrégrFree-minded National PartyJulius
The Young Czech Party (, officially National Liberal Party, Národní strana svobodomyslná) was formed in the Bohemian crown land of Austria-Hungary in 1874.wikipedia
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Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
It initiated the democratization of Czech political parties and led to the establishment of the political base of Czechoslovakia.
An advocate of democratic reform and Czech autonomy within Austria-Hungary, Masaryk was elected twice to the Reichsrat (Austrian Parliament), first from 1891 to 1893 for the Young Czech Party, and again from 1907 to 1914 for the Czech Realist Party, which he had founded in 1889 with Karel Kramář and Josef Kaizl.

Karel Kramář

Dr. Karel KramářKarel Kramá
In February 1918, the party formally merged with a new coalition, the Czech State Right Democratic Party, which later, under the Republic, became the party of Czechoslovak National Democracy headed by Karel Kramář.
He was a representative of the major Czech political party, the Young Czechs, in the Austrian Imperial Council from 1891 to 1915 (where he was also known as Karl Kramarsch), becoming the party leader in 1897.

Czechoslovak National Democracy

National DemocracyNational Democratic PartyNational Democrats
In February 1918, the party formally merged with a new coalition, the Czech State Right Democratic Party, which later, under the Republic, became the party of Czechoslovak National Democracy headed by Karel Kramář.
The party was established in 1918 by a merger of the Free-minded National Party ("Young Czechs") and several smaller parties, and was initially known as the Czech Constitutional Democratic Party. It formed the first provisional government led by Karel Kramář, and the following year it was renamed the National Democracy.

Sokol

Sokol movementSokoCzech gymnastics
The supporters of the Young Czechs came from petty tradespeople, lawyers, progressive intellectuals, teachers and university students, some leaders in the Sokol gymnastic organization and middling farmers hurt by Hungarian and North American competition.
Most founders were also members of the Young Czechs party, the most influential including Prince Rudolf von Thurn-Taxis, Josef Barák, and Julius and Eduard Grégr.

Alois Pravoslav Trojan

This defiance, led by Alois Pravoslav Trojan and Edvard Grégr, heralded the decision to form an independent Young Czech party in December of the same year.
He was active in Revolutions of 1848 in the Austrian Empire, politician of Old Czech Party, later since 1880 leader of the Young Czech Party.

Franz Joseph I of Austria

Franz Joseph IFranz JosephFrancis Joseph I
Yet by 1860, due to the lost Second Italian War of Independence, Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria was forced to revoke absolutist policies with the October Diploma in an attempt to pacify internal dissent, including the implementation of an Imperial Council parliament.
Masaryk served in the Reichsrat (Imperial Council) from 1891 to 1893 in the Young Czech Party and again from 1907 to 1914 in the Realist Party (which he had founded in 1900), but he did not campaign for the independence of Czechs and Slovaks from Austria-Hungary.

Neo-Slavism

neo-Slavicneoslavism
*Neo-Slavism
It was particularly popular with the Young Czech Party in Austria-Hungary and has been described as "essentially a Czech creation".

Old Czech Party

Old Czech
Their followers believed in the liberal approach to the nationalist program prescribed by the Young Czechs rather than the more conservative approach of the Old Czechs.
An important event in the history of the party were split of Young Czech wing of the party, in 1874 formed Young Czech Party led by Karel Sladkovský.

František Ladislav Rieger

František RiegerRiegrův
Immediately, a Czech National Party (Národní strana, "Old Czech" party) was formed under the guidance of František Palacký and his son-in-law, František Ladislav Rieger.
The National Party was now divided between the Young Czechs and the Old Czechs, headed by Rieger.

Národní listy

The National Newspaper
From 1861 to 1894 it was published by Julius Grégr; since 1874 it was the main newspaper of the Young Czech Party.

Josef Kaizl

In 1890 alongside other realists (including Masaryk) he joined the Young Czechs.

National liberalism

national liberalnational-liberalnational liberals
In Austria-Hungary the Young Czech Party, emerged in 1874 after a split from the Old Czech Party, was a national-liberal force.

Kingdom of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianBohemian Crown
The Young Czech Party (, officially National Liberal Party, Národní strana svobodomyslná) was formed in the Bohemian crown land of Austria-Hungary in 1874.

Austria-Hungary

Austro-HungarianAustro-Hungarian EmpireAustrian
The Young Czech Party (, officially National Liberal Party, Národní strana svobodomyslná) was formed in the Bohemian crown land of Austria-Hungary in 1874.

Czechs

CzechBohemianCzech people
It initiated the democratization of Czech political parties and led to the establishment of the political base of Czechoslovakia.

Revolutions of 1848 in the Austrian Empire

Revolutions of 1848Revolution of 18481848 revolution
The 1848 Revolutions, starting in Sicily before spreading to the rest of Europe, led to the formation of the first Czech political parties in the Austrian Empire.

Klemens von Metternich

MetternichPrince Klemens Wenzel von MetternichPrince Metternich
Upon the resignation of State Chancellor Klemens von Metternich, the new Austrian government under Prime Minister Franz Anton von Kolowrat-Liebsteinsky finally ceded to the provisional Bohemian "national assembly" (Svatováclavský výbor roku 1848) the right to hold elections for a Landtag parliament in the Lands of the Bohemian Crown.

Franz Anton von Kolowrat-Liebsteinsky

Count KolowratCount Franz Anton II.Count Franz Anton Kolowrat
Upon the resignation of State Chancellor Klemens von Metternich, the new Austrian government under Prime Minister Franz Anton von Kolowrat-Liebsteinsky finally ceded to the provisional Bohemian "national assembly" (Svatováclavský výbor roku 1848) the right to hold elections for a Landtag parliament in the Lands of the Bohemian Crown.

Landtag

state parliamentparliamentstate parliaments
Upon the resignation of State Chancellor Klemens von Metternich, the new Austrian government under Prime Minister Franz Anton von Kolowrat-Liebsteinsky finally ceded to the provisional Bohemian "national assembly" (Svatováclavský výbor roku 1848) the right to hold elections for a Landtag parliament in the Lands of the Bohemian Crown.

Lands of the Bohemian Crown

Bohemian CrownBohemiaCrown of Bohemia
Upon the resignation of State Chancellor Klemens von Metternich, the new Austrian government under Prime Minister Franz Anton von Kolowrat-Liebsteinsky finally ceded to the provisional Bohemian "national assembly" (Svatováclavský výbor roku 1848) the right to hold elections for a Landtag parliament in the Lands of the Bohemian Crown.

Leopold, Count von Thun und Hohenstein

Leopold von Thun und HohensteinCount Leopold von ThunCount Thun
Though initially backed by the Austrian governor Count Leopold von Thun und Hohenstein, the attempt failed due to disagreement with Moravian and Austrian Silesian representatives as well as the resistance of the German-speaking minority.

Moravia

MoravaMoravianMähren
Though initially backed by the Austrian governor Count Leopold von Thun und Hohenstein, the attempt failed due to disagreement with Moravian and Austrian Silesian representatives as well as the resistance of the German-speaking minority.

Austrian Silesia

SilesiaUpper and Lower SilesiaDuchy of Upper and Lower Silesia
Though initially backed by the Austrian governor Count Leopold von Thun und Hohenstein, the attempt failed due to disagreement with Moravian and Austrian Silesian representatives as well as the resistance of the German-speaking minority.

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
Though initially backed by the Austrian governor Count Leopold von Thun und Hohenstein, the attempt failed due to disagreement with Moravian and Austrian Silesian representatives as well as the resistance of the German-speaking minority.

Prague Slavic Congress, 1848

Prague Slavic CongressPan-Slavic CongressSlavic Congress
In June 1848 the Prague Slavic Congress, led by the historian František Palacký, who had rejected his mandate to the Frankfurt Parliament, demanded a federation of the Austrian states and the withdrawal from the German Confederation.