Yupik languages

YupikYupik languageCentral Yup'ikYup'ikCentral Alaskan Yup'ikCup'igYup'ik branch
The Yupik languages are the several distinct languages of the several Yupik peoples of western and south-central Alaska and northeastern Siberia.wikipedia
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Eskimo–Aleut languages

Eskimo–AleutEskimoEskimo-Aleut
The Yupik languages are in the family of Eskimo–Aleut languages.
The Eskimo languages are divided into two branches: the Yupik languages, spoken in western and southwestern Alaska and in Chukotka, and the Inuit languages, spoken in northern Alaska, Canada and Greenland.

Inuit languages

InuitInuit languageInuktitut
The Aleut and Eskimo languages diverged around 2000 BC (contemporaneous with the split of Indo-Iranian); within the Eskimo classification, the Yupik languages diverged from each other and from the Inuit language around 1000 AD.
The related Yupik languages are spoken in western and southern Alaska and in the far east of Russia, but are severely endangered in Russia today and spoken only in a few villages on the Chukchi Peninsula.

Eskimo

EskimosEsquimauxInuit
The Aleut and Eskimo languages diverged around 2000 BC (contemporaneous with the split of Indo-Iranian); within the Eskimo classification, the Yupik languages diverged from each other and from the Inuit language around 1000 AD.
The non-Inuit sub-branch of the Eskimo branch of the Eskimo-Aleut language family consists of four distinct Yupik languages, two used in the Russian Far East and St. Lawrence Island, and two used in western Alaska, southwestern Alaska, and the western part of Southcentral Alaska.

Lavrentiya

Port Lawrence
Lavrentiya (Лавре́нтия, Yupik: Ӄышы; Chukchi: Ӄытрын) is a rural locality (a selo) and the administrative center of Chukotsky District of Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, Russia, located on Lavrentiya Bay, close to the Bering Strait.

Central Siberian Yupik language

Siberian YupikCentral Siberian YupikYupik
Central Siberian Yupik, (also known as Siberian Yupik, Bering Strait Yupik, Yuit, Yoit, "St. Lawrence Island Yupik", and in Russia "Chaplinski Yupik" or Yuk) is an endangered Yupik language spoken by the indigenous Siberian Yupik people along the coast of the Chukchi Peninsula in the Russian Far East and in the villages of Savoonga and Gambell on St. Lawrence Island.

Central Alaskan Yup'ik language

Central Alaskan Yup'ikYup'ikCentral Yup'ik
Central Alaskan Yupik, or Yupʼik (also rendered Yupik, Central Yupik, or indigenously Yugtun) is one of the languages of the Yupik family, in turn a member of the Eskimo–Aleut language group, spoken in western and southwestern Alaska.

Bristol Bay

Bristol Bay, Alaska
Bristol Bay (Iilgayaq in Central Yup'ik, Залив Бристольский ) is the eastern-most arm of the Bering Sea, at 57° to 59° North 157° to 162° West in Southwest Alaska.

Uelen

Prior to being named Uelen, the village was called Ulyk (Улык, Olyk in Yupik and Pok’ytkyn in Chukchi), meaning land's end and flooded place respectively.

Polysynthetic language

polysyntheticpolysynthesispolysynthetic languages
The Yupik languages, like other Eskimo–Aleut languages, represent a particular type of agglutinative language called an affixally polysynthetic language.
Polysynthetic languages typically have long "sentence-words" such as the Yupik word tuntussuqatarniksaitengqiggtuq which means "He had not yet said again that he was going to hunt reindeer."

Alutiiq

SugpiaqAlutiiq peopleSugpiaq ~ Alutiiq
It is one of the Eskimo–Aleut languages, belonging to the Yup'ik branch of these languages.

Sirenik Eskimo language

SirenikSireniki Eskimo languageSireniki
One of them, Sirenik, has been extinct since 1997.
Some argue that the Sirenik language is a remnant of a third group of Eskimo languages, in addition to Yupik and Inuit groups (see a visual representation by tree and an argumentation based on comparative linguistics ).

Agglutinative language

agglutinativeagglutinatingagglutinating language
The Yupik languages, like other Eskimo–Aleut languages, represent a particular type of agglutinative language called an affixally polysynthetic language.

Naukan Yupik language

NaukanNaukan YupikEast Cape Yupik language
It is one of the four Yupik languages, along with Central Siberian Yupik, Central Alaskan Yup'ik and Pacific Gulf Yupik.

Yupik peoples

YupikYup'ikYupik people
The Yupik languages are the several distinct languages of the several Yupik peoples of western and south-central Alaska and northeastern Siberia.
The five Yupik languages (related to Inuktitut) are still very widely spoken; more than 75% of the Yupik/Yup'ik population are fluent in the language.

Alaska

CityAKAlaskan
The Yupik languages are the several distinct languages of the several Yupik peoples of western and south-central Alaska and northeastern Siberia.

Siberia

SiberianEastern SiberiaEast Siberia
The Yupik languages are the several distinct languages of the several Yupik peoples of western and south-central Alaska and northeastern Siberia.

Extinct language

extinctdead languageextinct languages
One of them, Sirenik, has been extinct since 1997.

Aleut language

AleutAleutianUnangax̂
The Aleut and Eskimo languages diverged around 2000 BC (contemporaneous with the split of Indo-Iranian); within the Eskimo classification, the Yupik languages diverged from each other and from the Inuit language around 1000 AD.

Indo-Iranian languages

Indo-IranianIndo-Iranian languageIndo-Iranian branch
The Aleut and Eskimo languages diverged around 2000 BC (contemporaneous with the split of Indo-Iranian); within the Eskimo classification, the Yupik languages diverged from each other and from the Inuit language around 1000 AD.