Z

tailed zBritish Englishcurly-tailed ''zSee belowthe way that the letter Z is pronouncedto British ears at leastTypographyZ → Usagezed
Z or z is the 26th and final letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.wikipedia
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Letter (alphabet)

letterlettersbookstaff
Z or z is the 26th and final letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.
Z, for example, is usually called zed in all English-speaking countries except the US, where it is named zee.

Zeta

ΖZeta (letter)ceda
In most English-speaking countries, including the United Kingdom, Canada, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Zambia, and Australia, the letter's name is zed, reflecting its derivation from the Greek zeta (this dates to Latin, which borrowed X, Y, and Z from Greek, along with their names), but in American English its name is zee, analogous to the names for B, C, D, etc., and deriving from a late 17th-century English dialectal form.
Letters that arose from zeta include the Roman Z and Cyrillic З.

English alphabet

modern English alphabetEnglishalphabet
Z or z is the 26th and final letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

Yogh

Ȝyochȝ (yogh)
The character ezh resembles a tailed z, as does the yogh, with which it came to be indistinguishable in Middle English writing.
In Middle English writing, tailed z came to be indistinguishable from yogh.

Norwegian language

NorwegianNeutralNorwegian:
Other languages spell the letter's name in a similar way: zeta in Italian, Basque, Spanish, and Icelandic (no longer part of its alphabet but found in personal names), zê in Portuguese, zäta in Swedish, zæt in Danish, zet in Dutch, Indonesian, Polish, Romanian, and Czech, Zett in German (capitalised as a noun), zett in Norwegian, zède in French, zetto in Japanese romaji, and zét in Vietnamese.

Czech language

CzechcsCzech-language
Other languages spell the letter's name in a similar way: zeta in Italian, Basque, Spanish, and Icelandic (no longer part of its alphabet but found in personal names), zê in Portuguese, zäta in Swedish, zæt in Danish, zet in Dutch, Indonesian, Polish, Romanian, and Czech, Zett in German (capitalised as a noun), zett in Norwegian, zède in French, zetto in Japanese romaji, and zét in Vietnamese. stands for a voiced alveolar or voiced dental sibilant, in Albanian, Breton, Czech, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Romanian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, and the International Phonetic Alphabet.
For example, od (from, away from) and z (out of, off) assign the genitive case.

Polish language

PolishplPolish-language
Other languages spell the letter's name in a similar way: zeta in Italian, Basque, Spanish, and Icelandic (no longer part of its alphabet but found in personal names), zê in Portuguese, zäta in Swedish, zæt in Danish, zet in Dutch, Indonesian, Polish, Romanian, and Czech, Zett in German (capitalised as a noun), zett in Norwegian, zède in French, zetto in Japanese romaji, and zét in Vietnamese.

Phoenician alphabet

PhoenicianPhoenician scriptSemitic
The Greek form of Z was a close copy of the Phoenician Zayin, and the Greek inscriptional form remained in this shape throughout ancient times.

Finnish orthography

FinnishFinnish alphabetm'''inä
The last letter for the Icelandic, Finnish and Swedish alphabets is Ö, while it is Å for Danish and Norwegian.

Indonesian language

IndonesianBahasa IndonesiaIndonesia
Other languages spell the letter's name in a similar way: zeta in Italian, Basque, Spanish, and Icelandic (no longer part of its alphabet but found in personal names), zê in Portuguese, zäta in Swedish, zæt in Danish, zet in Dutch, Indonesian, Polish, Romanian, and Czech, Zett in German (capitalised as a noun), zett in Norwegian, zède in French, zetto in Japanese romaji, and zét in Vietnamese.

Proto-Sinaitic script

Proto-Sinaitic alphabetProto-SinaiticMiddle Bronze Age alphabets
The Semitic symbol was the seventh letter, named zayin, which meant "weapon" or "sword".

Orthographic ligature

ligatureligaturestypographic ligature
Ligated with long s, it is part of the origin of the Eszett in the German alphabet.
The French, Portuguese, Catalan and old Spanish letter ç represents a c over a z; the diacritic's name cedilla means "little zed".

Ö

also spelledo:Öö
The last letter for the Icelandic, Finnish and Swedish alphabets is Ö, while it is Å for Danish and Norwegian.
It is collated as an independent letter, sometimes by placing it at the end of the alphabet, such as in Swedish and Icelandic; and in Finnish, after Z, Å and Ä, thus fulfilling the place of omega, for example in the Finnish expression aasta ööhön "from A to Z".

Romanian language

RomanianRomanian-languageDaco-Romanian
Other languages spell the letter's name in a similar way: zeta in Italian, Basque, Spanish, and Icelandic (no longer part of its alphabet but found in personal names), zê in Portuguese, zäta in Swedish, zæt in Danish, zet in Dutch, Indonesian, Polish, Romanian, and Czech, Zett in German (capitalised as a noun), zett in Norwegian, zède in French, zetto in Japanese romaji, and zét in Vietnamese. stands for a voiced alveolar or voiced dental sibilant, in Albanian, Breton, Czech, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Romanian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, and the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Å

ǺDanish spelling reform of 1948
The last letter for the Icelandic, Finnish and Swedish alphabets is Ö, while it is Å for Danish and Norwegian.
In the Swedish and Finnish alphabets, Å is sorted after Z, as the third letter from the end, the sequence being Å, Ä, Ö.

Z with swash tail

ɀ
Ɀ (lowercase: ɀ) is a Latin letter z with a "swash tail" (encoded by Unicode, at codepoints U+2C7F for uppercase and U+0240 for lowercase) was used as a phonetic symbol by linguists studying African languages to represent a voiced labio-alveolar fricative.

Zed

Zed (disambiguation)
Zed is the pronunciation of the letter Z in Commonwealth English ("zee" in American English).

Zee

Zee (disambiguation)Z
Zee is the phonetic pronunciation of the letter Z in American English ("zed" in Commonwealth English).

Ž

The grapheme Ž (minuscule: ž) is formed from Latin Z with the addition of caron (háček, mäkčeň, strešica, kvačica).

Ż

Ż, ż (Z with overdot) is a letter, consisting of the letter Z of the ISO basic Latin alphabet and an overdot.

Z with stroke

Ƶvariant with a stroke
There is also a variant with a stroke.
Ƶ (minuscule: ƶ) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, derived from Z with the addition of a stroke.

Latvian language

LatvianLatvian-languageLettish
stands for a voiced alveolar or voiced dental sibilant, in Albanian, Breton, Czech, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Romanian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, and the International Phonetic Alphabet.
The letters C, S and Z, that in unmodified form are pronounced, and respectively, can be marked with a caron.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
It is the least frequently used letter in written English, with a frequency of about 0.07% in words.
The modern English alphabet contains 26 letters of the Latin script: a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z (which also have capital forms: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z).

Dz (digraph)

DzHungarian dzDZ
Dz is a digraph of the Latin script, consisting of the consonants D and Z.

Inari Sami language

Inari SamiInari SámiInari
represents in Northern Sami and Inari Sami.