Zeus

JupiterCronidesZeus ChrysaoreusDiasgod of the same nameVelchanosZ'''eusZeus KasiosZeus PatērZeus-Ammon
Zeus (British English, North American English ;, Zeús ) is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus.wikipedia
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Ancient Greek religion

Greek PolytheismGreek religionGreek
Zeus (British English, North American English ;, Zeús ) is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus.
Most ancient Greeks recognized the twelve major Olympian gods and goddesses—Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, Demeter, Athena, Ares, Aphrodite, Apollo, Artemis, Hephaestus, Hermes, and either Hestia or Dionysus—although philosophies such as Stoicism and some forms of Platonism used language that seems to assume a single transcendent deity.

List of thunder gods

thunder godgod of thunderthunder
Zeus (British English, North American English ;, Zeús ) is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus.
In Indo-European cultures, the thunder god is frequently known as the chief or King of the Gods, e.g. Indra in Hinduism, Zeus in Greek mythology, and Perun in ancient Slavic religion.

Ares

god of the same namegod of warMars
In most traditions, he is married to Hera, by whom he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe, and Hephaestus.
He is one of the Twelve Olympians, the son of Zeus and Hera.

Hera

JunoHereGreek Goddess of the same name
In most traditions, he is married to Hera, by whom he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe, and Hephaestus.
Hera (, Hērā; Ἥρη, Hērē in Ionic and Homeric Greek) is the goddess of women, marriage, family, and childbirth in ancient Greek religion and myth, one of the Twelve Olympians and the sister-wife of Zeus.

Cronus

KronosCronosSaturn
Zeus is the child of Cronus and Rhea, the youngest of his siblings to be born, though sometimes reckoned the eldest as the others required disgorging from Cronus's stomach.
He overthrew his father and ruled during the mythological Golden Age, until he was overthrown by his own son Zeus and imprisoned in Tartarus.

Hebe (mythology)

HebeIuventas HEBE
In most traditions, he is married to Hera, by whom he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe, and Hephaestus.
She is the daughter of Zeus and Hera.

Apollo

PhoebusPythian ApolloApollo Carneius
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
He is the son of Zeus and Leto, and the twin brother of Artemis, goddess of the hunt.

Hermes

Hermes CriophorusMercuryHermes Psychopompus
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
Hermes is the god of trade, heralds, merchants, commerce, roads, thieves, trickery, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods (Dionysus being the youngest).

Artemis

CynthiaArtemis TauropolosArtemis Leucophryene
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
Artemis is the daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo.

Persephone

KoreCoreAbduction of Proserpina
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
In Greek mythology, Persephone, also called Kore ("the maiden"), is the daughter of Zeus and Demeter.

Dionysus

BacchusDionysosDionysiac
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
In his religion, identical with or closely related to Orphism, Dionysus was believed to have been born from the union of Zeus and Persephone, and to have himself represented a chthonic or underworld aspect of Zeus.

Interpretatio graeca

interpretatio romanaidentified withidentified
His name is cognate with the first element of his Roman equivalent Jupiter.
In his observations regarding the Egyptians, he establishes Greco-Egyptian equivalents that endured into the Hellenistic era, including Amon/Zeus, Osiris/Dionysus, and Ptah/Hephaestus.

Heracles

HeraklesHerculesAlcides
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
Heracles (, Hēraklês, Glory/Pride of Hēra, "Hera"), born Alcaeus (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs) was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus and Alcmene, foster son of Amphitryon.

Indra

Lord IndraDevendranTaishakuten
His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical, to those of Indo-European deities such as Jupiter, Perkūnas, Perun, Indra and Thor.
His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical, to other Indo-European deities such as Jupiter, Perun, Perkūnas, Taranis, Zeus, and Thor.

Athena

Pallas AthenaPallasPallas Athene
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
In Greek mythology, Athena was believed to have been born from the head of her father Zeus.

Minos

King MinosKing Minos of Creteking of Crete
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
In Greek mythology, Minos (, Minōs) was the first King of Crete, son of Zeus and Europa.

Perseus

The Gorgon's Headdefeat of the GorgonGreek legend
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
He was the son of Zeus and the mortal Danaë, as well as the half-brother and great-grandfather of Heracles.

Hephaestus

HephaistosHephaestoseight spellings
In most traditions, he is married to Hera, by whom he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe, and Hephaestus.
In Greek mythology, Hephaestus was either the son of Zeus and Hera or he was Hera's parthenogenous child.

Oracle

oraclesoracularseer
At the oracle of Dodona, his consort was said to be Dione, by whom the Iliad states that he fathered Aphrodite.
The most important oracles of Greek antiquity were Pythia (priestess to Apollo at Delphi), and the oracle of Dione and Zeus at Dodona in Epirus.

Sky father

King of HeavenFather SkyHeavenly-Father
Zeus (British English, North American English ;, Zeús ) is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus.
"Sky Father" is a direct translation of the Vedic Dyaus Pita, etymologically descended from the same Proto-Indo-European deity name as the Greek Zeû Pater and Roman Jupiter, all of which are reflexes of the same Proto-Indo-European deity's name, *Dyēus Ph₂tḗr.

Helen of Troy

HelenHelen of SpartaHelena
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
She was believed to have been the daughter of Zeus and Leda, and was the sister of Clytemnestra, Castor and Polydeuces, Philonoe, Phoebe and Timandra.

Aphrodite

CyprisVenusAphrodite Urania
At the oracle of Dodona, his consort was said to be Dione, by whom the Iliad states that he fathered Aphrodite.
In Homer's Iliad, however, she is the daughter of Zeus and Dione.

Thunderbolt

lightning boltlightning boltsThunderbolts
Zeus' symbols are the thunderbolt, eagle, bull, and oak.
In Indo-European mythology, the thunderbolt was identified with the 'Sky Father'; this association is also found in later Hellenic representations of Zeus and Vedic descriptions of the vajra wielded by the god Indra.

Iliad

The IliadIlliadIlias
At the oracle of Dodona, his consort was said to be Dione, by whom the Iliad states that he fathered Aphrodite.
Achilles asks his mother to ask Zeus to bring the Greeks to the breaking point by the Trojans, so Agamemnon will realize how much the Greeks need Achilles.

Muses

museThe MusesNine Muses
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.
600 BC), generally followed by the writers of antiquity, the Nine Muses were the nine daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne (i.e., "Memory" personified), figuring as personifications of knowledge and the arts, especially literature, dance and music.