Zinc–air battery

zinc-air batterieszinc-air batteryZinc–airZinc-airZinc–air batteriesbatteriesBattery, zinc-airMiniature zinc-air batterieszinc airzinc air battery
Zinc–air batteries (non-rechargeable), and zinc–air fuel cells (mechanically rechargeable) are metal–air batteries powered by oxidizing zinc with oxygen from the air.wikipedia
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Button cell

coin cellLR44CR2032
Sizes range from very small button cells for hearing aids, larger batteries used in film cameras that previously used mercury batteries, to very large batteries used for electric vehicle propulsion.
Relatively high-power devices such as hearing aids may use a zinc–air battery which have much higher capacity for a given size, but dry out over a few weeks even if not used.

Electric vehicle battery

batterybatteriestraction batteries
Possible future applications of this battery include its deployment as an electric vehicle battery and as a utility-scale energy storage system.
Rechargeable batteries used in electric vehicles include lead–acid ("flooded", deep-cycle, and VRLA), NiCd, nickel–metal hydride, lithium-ion, Li-ion polymer, and, less commonly, zinc–air and molten-salt batteries.

Zinc

ZnZn 2+ zinc alloy
Zinc–air batteries (non-rechargeable), and zinc–air fuel cells (mechanically rechargeable) are metal–air batteries powered by oxidizing zinc with oxygen from the air.
Zinc is used as the anode or fuel of the zinc-air battery/fuel cell.

Metal–air electrochemical cell

metal-air batteriesmetal–airmetal-air battery
Zinc–air batteries (non-rechargeable), and zinc–air fuel cells (mechanically rechargeable) are metal–air batteries powered by oxidizing zinc with oxygen from the air.

Electric battery

batterybatteriesbattery-powered
Zinc–air batteries (non-rechargeable), and zinc–air fuel cells (mechanically rechargeable) are metal–air batteries powered by oxidizing zinc with oxygen from the air.

Energy density

energy densitiesenergyenergy per unit volume
These batteries have high energy densities and are relatively inexpensive to produce.

Mercury battery

mercury batteriesMercury cellMercuric oxide
Sizes range from very small button cells for hearing aids, larger batteries used in film cameras that previously used mercury batteries, to very large batteries used for electric vehicle propulsion.
Alternatives used are zinc-air batteries, with similar discharge curve, high capacity, but much shorter lifetime (a few months), and poor performance in dry climates; alkaline batteries with voltage widely varying through their lifetime; and silver-oxide batteries with higher voltage (1.55 V) and very flat discharge curve, which makes them possibly the best, though expensive, replacement after recalibrating the meter to the new voltage.

Hearing aid

hearing aidshearing instrumentshearing technology
Sizes range from very small button cells for hearing aids, larger batteries used in film cameras that previously used mercury batteries, to very large batteries used for electric vehicle propulsion.
While there are some instances that a hearing aid uses a rechargeable battery or a long-life disposable battery, the majority of modern hearing aids use one of five standard button cell zinc–air batteries.

Zinc oxide

ZnOzinc whiteI
The zincate decays into zinc oxide and water returns to the electrolyte.
Zinc-air battery

Fluidic Energy

Fluidic Energy has apparently covered hundreds of thousands of outages in Asia at distributed critical load sites.
Fluidic Energy's products are built around a rechargeable zinc–air battery developed initially at Arizona State University, with continued development since 2006.

Battery holder

battery compartment
Zinc–air batteries cannot be used in a sealed battery holder since some air must come in; the oxygen in 1 liter of air is required for every ampere-hour of capacity used.
Battery holders for zinc-air batteries must not be completely air-tight since approximately 1 litre of air is required per ampere-hour of discharge per cell.

List of battery sizes

AA batteries217002CR5
List of battery sizes
They have been replaced in some applications by zinc-air batteries, which also produce 1.35 volts.

Fuel cell

fuel cellshydrogen fuel cellfuel-cell
Zinc–air batteries (non-rechargeable), and zinc–air fuel cells (mechanically rechargeable) are metal–air batteries powered by oxidizing zinc with oxygen from the air.

Gas diffusion electrode

gas diffusion
Gas diffusion electrode
For applications with liquid electrolytes, such as the zinc-air battery or the alkaline fuel cell, the dry mixture method is used.

Aluminium–air battery

aluminum-air batteryAluminium-air batteriesAluminium–air
Aluminium–air battery
Zinc–air battery

Redox

oxidationreductionoxidized
Zinc–air batteries (non-rechargeable), and zinc–air fuel cells (mechanically rechargeable) are metal–air batteries powered by oxidizing zinc with oxygen from the air.

Oxygen

OO 2 molecular oxygen
Zinc–air batteries (non-rechargeable), and zinc–air fuel cells (mechanically rechargeable) are metal–air batteries powered by oxidizing zinc with oxygen from the air.

Camera

camerasWebcamexposure control
Sizes range from very small button cells for hearing aids, larger batteries used in film cameras that previously used mercury batteries, to very large batteries used for electric vehicle propulsion.

Electric vehicle

electric vehicleselectricEV
Sizes range from very small button cells for hearing aids, larger batteries used in film cameras that previously used mercury batteries, to very large batteries used for electric vehicle propulsion.

Anode

anodicanodes(anode)
During discharge, a mass of zinc particles forms a porous anode, which is saturated with an electrolyte.

Electrolyte

electrolyteselectrolyticionic solution
During discharge, a mass of zinc particles forms a porous anode, which is saturated with an electrolyte.

Cathode

cathodiccopper cathode(cathode)
Oxygen from the air reacts at the cathode and forms hydroxyl ions which migrate into the zinc paste and form zincate, releasing electrons to travel to the cathode.

Hydroxy group

hydroxylhydroxyl grouphydroxy
Oxygen from the air reacts at the cathode and forms hydroxyl ions which migrate into the zinc paste and form zincate, releasing electrons to travel to the cathode.