Zorro

El ZorroA Marca do Zorrofictional characterThe Mark of ZorroZorro series Zorro Alejandro de la VegaAlejandro Murrieta / ZorroDon Diego de la VegaDon Diego de la Vega / Zorro
Zorro (Spanish for "Fox") is a fictional character created in 1919 by American pulp writer Johnston McCulley, and appearing in works set in the Pueblo of Los Angeles during the era of Spanish California (1769–1821).wikipedia
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Johnston McCulley

Johnston M. McCulley
Zorro (Spanish for "Fox") is a fictional character created in 1919 by American pulp writer Johnston McCulley, and appearing in works set in the Pueblo of Los Angeles during the era of Spanish California (1769–1821).
Johnston McCulley (February 2, 1883 – November 23, 1958) was the author of hundreds of stories, fifty novels, numerous screenplays for film and television, and the creator of the character Zorro.

Zorro (1957 TV series)

ZorroZorro'' (1957 TV series)1957
While the rest of McCulley's Zorro stories didn't enjoy the same popularity, as most of them were never reprinted until the 21st century, the character also appears in over 40 films and in ten TV series, the most famous being the Disney-produced Zorro series of 1957–59, starring Guy Williams.
Based on the Zorro character created by Johnston McCulley, the series premiered on October 10, 1957 on ABC.

Tornado (horse)

Tornadohorse
He is also an accomplished rider, his trusty steed being a black horse called Tornado.
Tornado (occasionally Toronado) is a horse ridden by the character Zorro in several films and books.

Secret identity

secret identitiesdual identityidentities
Zorro is the secret identity of Don Diego de la Vega (originally Don Diego Vega), a young man who is the only son of Don Alejandro de la Vega (originally Don Alejandro Vega), the richest landowner in California, while Diego's mother is dead.
The modern popular culture use of secret identities begins in the early 20th century with characters such as the Scarlet Pimpernel (1903), Jimmie Dale, the Gray Seal (1914), Zorro (1919), and the Lone Ranger (1933).

Superhero

superheroessuperheroinesuper hero
Being one of the earliest examples of a fictional masked avenger with a double identity, Zorro inspired the creation of several similar characters in pulp magazines and other media, and is a precursor of the superheroes of American comic books, with Batman drawing particularly close parallels to the character.
Shortly afterward, masked and costumed pulp fiction characters such as Jimmie Dale/the Gray Seal (1914), Zorro (1919), The Shadow (1930) and comic strip heroes, such as the Phantom (1936) began appearing, as did non-costumed characters with super strength, including Patoruzú (1928), the comic-strip character Popeye (1929) and novelist Philip Wylie's character Hugo Danner (1930).

The Curse of Capistrano

Zorro made his debut in the 1919 novel The Curse of Capistrano, originally meant as a stand-alone story.
The Curse of Capistrano is a 1919 serialized novel by Johnston McCulley and the first work to feature the fictional Californio character Zorro (zorro is the Spanish word for fox).

The Mark of Zorro (1920 film)

The Mark of Zorro19201920 film version
However, the success of the 1920 film adaptation The Mark of Zorro starring Douglas Fairbanks convinced McCulley to write more Zorro stories for about four decades: the character was featured in a total of five serialized stories and 57 short stories, the last one appearing in print posthumously in 1959, the year after his death.
Based on the 1919 story The Curse of Capistrano by Johnston McCulley, which introduced the masked hero, Zorro, the screenplay was adapted by Fairbanks (as "Elton Thomas") and Eugene Miller.

Batman

Bruce WayneBruce Wayne / BatmanBruce Wayne/Batman
Being one of the earliest examples of a fictional masked avenger with a double identity, Zorro inspired the creation of several similar characters in pulp magazines and other media, and is a precursor of the superheroes of American comic books, with Batman drawing particularly close parallels to the character.
As an aristocratic hero with a double identity, Batman had predecessors in the Scarlet Pimpernel (created by Baroness Emmuska Orczy, 1903) and Zorro (created by Johnston McCulley, 1919).

Joaquin Murrieta

Star and Death of Joaquin MurrietaEl diablo, MurrietaJoaquin
The historical figure most often associated with the Zorro character is Joaquin Murrieta, whose life was fictionalized in an 1854 dime novel by John Rollin Ridge.
In 1919, Johnston McCulley supposedly received his inspiration for his fictional character Don Diego de la Vega—better known as Zorro—from the 1854 book entitled The Life and Adventures of Joaquín Murieta: The Celebrated California Bandit by John Rollin Ridge.

Zorro (1990 TV series)

ZorroThe New Zorro1990
The Family Channel's Zorro television series replaces Bernardo with a teenager named Felipe, played by Juan Diego Botto, with a similar disability and pretense.
Zorro (also known as The New Zorro, New World Zorro, and Zorro 1990) is an American action-adventure drama series featuring Duncan Regehr as the character of Zorro.

Zorro's Fighting Legion

An exception is Zorro's Fighting Legion (1939), starring Reed Hadley as Diego.
Zorro's Fighting Legion is a 1939 Republic Pictures film serial consisting of twelve chapters starring Reed Hadley as Zorro and directed by William Witney and John English.

The Mask of Zorro

ZorroEl Sambrero BlancoEléna de la Vega
In the 1998 film The Mask of Zorro Murrieta's (fictitious) brother Alejandro succeeds Diego as Zorro.
The Mask of Zorro is a 1998 American swashbuckler film based on the character of the masked vigilante Zorro created by Johnston McCulley.

The Scarlet Pimpernel

Scarlet PimpernelPimpernelSir Percy Blakeney
As a hero with a secret identity who taunts his foes by signing his deeds, Zorro finds a direct literary predecessor in Sir Percival Blakeney, hero of the Scarlet Pimpernel pulp series by Emma Orczy.
Zorro, The Shadow, Superman and Batman followed within a few decades, and the trope remains a popular one in serial fiction today.

Don Q, Son of Zorro

However, Fairbanks's sequel, Don Q, Son of Zorro (1925), was more based on the 1919 novel Don Q's Love Story by the mother-son duo Kate Prichard and Hesketh Hesketh-Prichard than The Further Adventures.
The story was reworked in 1925 (after Hesketh Hesketh-Prichard's death) into a vehicle for the Johnston McCulley character Zorro.

The Mark of Zorro (1940 film)

The Mark of Zorro19401940 film version
Over 40 Zorro titled films were made over the years, including The Mark of Zorro, the 1940 classic starring Tyrone Power.
The film is based on The Curse of Capistrano written by Johnston McCulley, originally published in 1919 in five serialized installments in All-Story Weekly, which introduced the masked hero Zorro; the story is set in Southern California during the early 19th century.

Tales of Zorro

Tales of Zorro anthology of 17 short stories written by 22 authors, edited by Richard Dean Starr 2008 Moonstone Books ISBN: 978-1-933076-31-7
Tales of Zorro is a 2008 anthology of Zorro stories and is the first collection of original short fiction featuring pulp hero Zorro, edited by Richard Dean Starr and published by Moonstone Books in 2008.

Zorro (novel)

ZorroZorro'' (novel)
Zorro by Isabel Allende 2005 HarperCollins ISBN: 0-06-077897-0
Its subject is the pulp hero Diego de la Vega, better known as El Zorro (The Fox), who was featured in an early 20th-century novel.

Moonstone Books

MoonstoneMoonstone Comics
Tales of Zorro anthology of 17 short stories written by 22 authors, edited by Richard Dean Starr 2008 Moonstone Books ISBN: 978-1-933076-31-7
The company began publishing creator-owned comics in 1995, and since 2001 has also published material based on a number of licensed properties, including Zorro, Doc Savage, The Avenger, Buckaroo Banzai, Bulldog Drummond, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, Mr. Moto, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar, The Phantom, Honey West and several titles based in White Wolf's World of Darkness.

Robert Livingston (actor)

Robert LivingstonBob LivingstonRobert Livingstone
The Bold Caballero (1936), with Robert Livingston
He had also played The Lone Ranger and Zorro.

Fop

foppishclotheshorseclothes horse
In order to divert suspicion about his identity, Diego hides his fighting abilities while also pretending to be a coward and a fop.
A similar image is cultivated by Zorro's public identity, Don Diego de la Vega.

Zorro's Black Whip

Zorro's Black Whip (1944), with Linda Stirling as an 1880s female descendant, The Black Whip
The film was made after the 1940 20th Century-Fox remake of The Mark of Zorro and Republic wasn't able to use the character himself, but still wanted to capitalize on it. However, and despite the title, Zorro does not feature in this serial.

The Legend of Zorro

Theme from '''The Legend of ZorroThe Mask of Zorro II
The Legend of Zorro (2005), the sequel to 1998's The Mask of Zorro, again starred Antonio Banderas.
It is the sequel to 1998's The Mask of Zorro; Antonio Banderas and Catherine Zeta-Jones reprise their roles as the titular hero and his spouse, Elena, and Rufus Sewell stars as the villain, Count Armand.

Zorro Rides Again

Zorro Rides Again (1937), with John Carroll as a modern-day descendant, James Vega
The serial starred John Carroll who also sang the title song as a modern descendant of the original Zorro with Carroll stunt doubled by Yakima Canutt.

Guy Williams (actor)

Guy Williams
While the rest of McCulley's Zorro stories didn't enjoy the same popularity, as most of them were never reprinted until the 21st century, the character also appears in over 40 films and in ten TV series, the most famous being the Disney-produced Zorro series of 1957–59, starring Guy Williams.
About this time, the Walt Disney Company was casting for Zorro, a new television series based on the character created in 1919 by Johnston McCulley: the young nobleman Don Diego de la Vega and his masked alter ego Zorro.

John Carroll (actor)

John Carroll
Zorro Rides Again (1937), with John Carroll as a modern-day descendant, James Vega
He performed in several small roles in films under his birth name until 1935, when he first used the name John Carroll in Hi, Gaucho! He appeared in several Western films in the 1930s, including the role of Zorro in Zorro Rides Again in 1937.